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Copyright
All Rights Reserved ()

One of a Pair of Casement Windows from the Darwin Martin House, Buffalo, NY

Accession Number
1968/2.53

Title
One of a Pair of Casement Windows from the Darwin Martin House, Buffalo, NY

Artist(s)
Frank Lloyd Wright

Artist Nationality
American (North American)

Object Creation Date
1904

Medium & Support
glass, oak and lead

Dimensions
24 ⅝ in x 14 3/16 in x 1 3/16 in (62.55 cm x 36.04 cm x 3.02 cm);24 ⅝ in x 14 3/16 in x 1 3/16 in (62.55 cm x 36.04 cm x 3.02 cm)

Credit Line
Museum Purchase

Label copy
March 28, 2009
The Darwin Martin house in Buffalo, New York, stands as an outstanding example of Prairie School architecture; it was considered by Wright to be one of his most important and satisfying creations from the early part of his career. The design of this pair of windows from the first floor of the house is based on wisteria, seen in abstracted form in the vertical row of chevron-patterned glass. Though they date to essentially the same time as the museum’s windows by Louis Comfort Tiffany, Wright had a fundamentally different approach to the use of windows and their design. Whereas the bow window from the Havemeyer house employs the curving forms of nature, Wright distills natural forms into geometric patterns, and his windows were considered part of the overall design of the walls in his houses.

Subject matter
The Darwin Martin house was considered by Wright to be one of the most important and satisfying houses he build in the early part of his career and stands as an outstanding example of Prairie School architecture. This pair of windows (1968/2.53-53) from the first floor of the Martin house contain an abstracted pattern based on wisteria, seen in the vertical row of chevron-patterned glass.

Physical Description
One of a pair of windows with a highly regular, rectilinear, although asymetric, design in both clear and colored glass. Window has an oak frame. Window design consists of vertical and horizontal bands of green and amber colorerd glass at top and bottom of window; along one side are colored squares of glass; along the other is a chevron-shaped column of glass. The overall effect is of colored pieces of glass suspended within a clear window subdivided by abstract bands and patterns of lead caming.

Primary Object Classification
Decorative Arts

Primary Object Type
architectural element

Additional Object Classification(s)
Decorative Arts

Collection Area
Western

Rights
If you are interested in using an image for a publication, please visit http://umma.umich.edu/request-image for more information and to fill out the online Image Rights and Reproductions Request Form.

Keywords
Abstract (fine arts style)
windows

1 Related Resource

Architects of Modernism
(Part of: Architecture and Buildings)

& Author Notes

All Rights Reserved