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Copyright
All Rights Reserved ()

Erosion

Accession Number
2002/2.181

Title
Erosion

Artist(s)
Neil Scobie

Object Creation Date
1999

Medium & Support
Huron pine

Dimensions
24 5/16 x 17 5/16 x 2 1/2 in. (61.6 x 43.82 x 6.35 cm)

Credit Line
Gift of Robert M. and Lillian Montalto Bohlen

Label copy
A high school industrial arts teacher before becoming an independent professional woodworker more than 20 years ago, Scobie is a highly respected designer and wood artist, as well as one of Australia's foremost woodworking teachers and demonstrators.
Neil Scobie’s Erosion reflects natural features of the Australian landscape, and bears the imprint of not only a masterful turner, but of a gifted carver as well, resulting in a fascinating wall piece.

One can almost sense water flowing over the piece, running down through its eroded canals, pooling in the center before spilling over and trickling to the bottom. The crevice dividing the piece is almost a stream, and the openwork in the center creates a beautiful interplay of shadow and light.
from the exhibition Nature Transformed: Wood Art from the Bohlen Collection, June 12 – October 3, 2004

Primary Object Classification
Sculpture

Collection Area
Modern and Contemporary

Rights
If you are interested in using an image for a publication, please visit http://umma.umich.edu/request-image for more information and to fill out the online Image Rights and Reproductions Request Form.

& Author Notes

All Rights Reserved