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PerloveHISTART 393 / JUDAIC 317 / RCORE 334: Holy Land in Jewish, Christian, Islamic Culture

Winter 2015

James McBey
The Advance on Jerusalem -- Wadi Ali (Second Palestine Set, No. 4)
1920
etching | paper
Gift of Carl Fredric Clarke
1949/1.76
Marc Chagall
The Bible: The People of Israel
1929 – 1939
etching | paper
Museum Purchase
1959/1.95
A series of architectural spaces unfold, each showing figures engaged in some activity.  At right, the largest figure is shown seated looking upwards towards a light source.  The same figure, somewhat smaller, walks from right to left towards  a small architectural space at the left where the same figure lays a hand on the head of a kneeling woman.  Other scenes continue into the distance.
Marten van Heemskerck
St. Peter Baptising at Jerusalem
1568 – 1578
pen and brown ink | cream paper
Museum Purchase
1965/1.158
Francesco Cincinato
The Entry of Christ into Jerusalem
1629
pen and brown ink with brown wash
Gift through the Estate of Edward Sonnenschein
1970/2.27
Laurent de La Hyre
Battle Between the Christians and the Saracens, a scene from Torquato Tasso, "La Gerusalemme Liberata"
17th century
black and white chalk | brown paper
Purchased from the Estate of Edward Sonnenschein
1970/2.87
Laurent de La Hyre
A Scene from 'La Gerusalemme Liberata:' Tancred and Clorinda
1620s
black and white chalk | brown paper
Purchased from the Estate of Edward Sonnenschein
1970/2.88
Laurent de La Hyre
A Scene from 'La Gerusalemme Liberata:' Tancred Mourns Clorinda
1620s
black and white chalk | brown paper
Purchased from the Estate of Edward Sonnenschein
1970/2.89
A. R. Penck
Snow in Jerusalem, from the portfolio "Expedition to the Holyland"
1983
aquatint | Arches vellum paper
Museum purchase made possible by a gift from Helmut Stern
1984/2.2.12
A. R. Penck
The Opposition Want to Overthrow the Government, from 'Expedition to the Holylan
1983
two-color screenprint | Arches vellum paper
Museum purchase made possible by a gift from Helmut Stern
1984/2.2.15
Landscape view from the perspective of a ruin in the foreground. A village of white buildings is visible in the background, at the foot of two hills.
Francis Frith
View at Hebron
1857
albumen print | paper
Gift of Frederick P. and Amy McCombs Currier
1988/1.94.1-2
Elevated view of a domed brick building with many levels positioned on the edge of a steep ravine.
Francis Frith
Convent of Mar-Saba, Near Jerusalem
1857
albumen print | paper
Gift of Frederick P. and Amy McCombs Currier
1988/1.95.1-2
Conical-shaped building situated between two hills in a rocky, mostly barren landscape. 
Francis Frith
Absalom's Tomb, Jerusalem
1857
albumen print | paper
Gift of Frederick P. and Amy McCombs Currier
1988/1.98.1-2

Throughout history fascinating images of Jerusalem were created in art and architecture by Jews, Christians and Muslims. This course investigates these images from the early modern period through the 21st century, an extended period which witnessed intense interest in the city from a religious, political, and romantic perspective. We will study paintings, prints, maps, architecture and photography, as well as contemporary installation art. While Jerusalem occupied the very center of the world in t-shaped maps of the middle ages, the city long remained the focus of attention for Christians, Jews, and Muslims who sought to literally or symbolically regain the sacred city with its famous religious sites. Renaissance Popes imagined Rome as the “New Jerusalem.” Christian rulers vainly attempted to launch crusades, now and then, from the fifteenth through the seventeenth centuries. 

Religious scholars, both Jewish and Christian, and European architects, continuously sought to reconstruct an “authentic” image of the ancient city and Temple in order to better understand the biblical events of the past. Many subsequent works of architecture such as churches and synagogues, including the Sistine Chapel, were inspired by the desire to re-create Solomon’s Temple. Early modern artists often depicted the Holy Land and the Temple of Jerusalem in the backgrounds of paintings and prints portraying biblical subjects. Moreover, Christians, Jews, and Muslims embarked upon pilgrimages to Jerusalem to renew their faith. In fulfillment of envisioned events of the End of Days, Christians, Jews, and Muslims focused upon Jerusalem as the site for these mystical events. European travelers were attracted by the exotic landscape and people of this region in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and Jewish settlers of the early 20th century viewed Palestine as an ancient homeland of refuge from persecution. All of these diverse motivations contributed to the creation of splendid works of art and architecture

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View at Hebron (1988/1.94.1-2)

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March 28, 2018 4:16 p.m.

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