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Exhibition research for Detroit Institute of Arts exhibition of prints, drawings, and photographs, tentatively scheduled for 2019.

Contact: Clare Rogan, Curator of Prints & Drawings, crogan@dia.org    

59 Items in this Learning Collection
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Copyright
All Rights Reserved ()

Pulqueria

Accession Number
1954/1.161

Title
Pulqueria

Artist(s)
José Clemente Orozco

Artist Nationality
Mexican

Object Creation Date
circa 1928

Medium & Support
lithograph on paper

Dimensions
13 in x 16 9/16 in (33.02 cm x 42.07 cm);22 in x 22 15/16 in (55.88 cm x 58.26 cm);15 3/16 in x 21 7/8 in (38.58 cm x 55.56 cm)

Credit Line
Gift of Mina L. Winslow

Subject matter
This print shows caricatures of indigenous Mexican men dance outside of a working man's bar called a pulquería. The title, Pulquería, is derived from the drink known as pulque which is a fermented juice from the maguey plant. Near Orozco's studio in Mexico was a place where people bought pulque called Echate La Otra, which translates to "Have Another One." The Indian men are wearing a mix of indigenous and westernized clothing to symbolize the mixed nature of Mexican popular culture. Their drinking and exaggerated facial features are characteristic of typical stereotypes of indigenous people. Orozco was known for criticizing the Mexican government, and he maintained a pessimistic perspective throughout his art. This print illustrates, "a compassion for the oppressed" but is simultaneously dismissive of social justice.
 

Physical Description
A crowd of figures dances and drinks outside of an establishment with the words "Echate La Otra" across the top of the entrance. Figures outside the restaurant are wearing patterned tunics, tall socks and shoes, and tall conical hats with plumes of feathers. The figures inside the establishment are wearing sombreros.

Primary Object Classification
Print

Primary Object Type
planographic print

Collection Area
Modern and Contemporary

Rights
If you are interested in using an image for a publication, please visit http://umma.umich.edu/request-image for more information and to fill out the online Image Rights and Reproductions Request Form.

Keywords
Vessels
alcohol (general)
buildings
caricatures
dancers
dancing (activity)
headdress
indigenous people
modern and contemporary art

12 Related Resources

Arts of Mexico
(Part of 2 Learning Collections)
Dance
(Part of 4 Learning Collections)
Indigenous North America Arts
(Part of 8 Learning Collections)
Social Justice
(Part of 3 Learning Collections)
Social Justice and Art 1900-1928
(Part of 4 Learning Collections)
Orozco, Rivera, Siqueiros Essay
(Part of 2 Learning Collections)

& Author Notes

All Rights Reserved