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Between and Mortarboard


UMMA Object Specific Fields






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Who Are We? 

I.B. Unit of Inquiry

An inquiry into the nature of the self; beliefs and values; personal, physical, mental, social and spiritual health; human relationships including families, friends, communities, and cultures; rights and responsibilities; what it means to be human. 

The color screenprint depicts four dark skinned figures walking past a construction site—likely a family. The man is dressed in a black suit, black shoes, yellow tie, and tan hat. The woman wears a red and white dress, yellow jacket, and red cap. The little girl stands to the left of mother, holding her hand. She wears a yellow dress, white tights, brown shoes, and a red cap. A small boy wears brown pants, tan shoes, a yellow shirt, and blue jacket. He stands to the right of the father and holds his hand.  <br /><br />
In the background, there are three men working at the construction site. There are two men in blue jumpsuits, one has dark skin and the other white. A third dark skinned man wears a gray jumpsuit and holds a saw. The print is signed and dated (l.r.) "Jacob Lawrence 1974" in pencil.
Jacob Lawrence
Builders (The Family)
1974
screenprint | paper
Gift of Dr. James and Vivian Curtis
1997/1.532
Prentiss Taylor
Macedonia A.M.E.
1934
lithograph | paper
Courtesy of the Fine Arts Program, Public Buildings Service, U.S. General Services Administration Commissioned through the New Deal art projects;Courtesy of the Fine Arts Collection, U.S. General Services Administration, New Deal art project
1935.14
This photograph depicts a view of a desert landscape with a fish hanging from the top of a thin pole in the foreground. &nbsp;Behind the fish is a small cemetery that has mounds and crosses and in the distance are a few small buildings. Two more poles with fish hanging from them appear farther away in the image to the right of the fish in the foreground.
Patrick Nagatani
Japanese Children's Day Carp Banners, Paguate Village, Jackpile Mine Uranium Tailings, Laguna Pueblo Reservation, New Mexico
1990
dye destruction print | paper
Gift of Beverly Baker in memory of Morris D. Baker
2004/1.106
Elliott Erwitt
Pennsylvania Dutch and Adidas, Santa Cruz, U.S.A., from "Recent Developments"
1975
gelatin silver print | paper
Gift of Lawrence and Carol Zicklin
1987/1.175.5
Portrait of an elderly couple in a living room adorned with religious icons.
Walker Evans
Untitled
1961
gelatin silver print | paper
Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Harry H. Lunn, Jr., in Honor of the Centennial of The Michigan Daily
1990/2.61
Oak panel with screen print; signed K.Haring 88 along lower right edge.
Keith Haring
Art Attack
1988
screenprint | oak panel
Gift of Margaret I. McIntosh
1991/1.137
Bernard Schardt
Girl Sewing
1930 – 1940
woodcut | paper
Allocated by the U.S. Government Commissioned through the New Deal art projects
1943.119
A drawing of a woman moving to the right, her right arm extended over her head and out of the frame, her left arm extended upward to her left. 
Abraham Walkowitz
Isadora Duncan
1909 – 1950
pen, watercolor, graphite | paper
Gift of Abraham Walkowitz
1950/1.118
Wood-carved, standing male figure 40 inches in height. Its shoulders and torso are impaled with iron blades, nails and fragments. The torso is long, arms at side are bent at elbow and hands rest on lower abdomen. The right wrist wears a bracelet with attachments. The legs are truncated, with twisted metal anklet on right foot. The face is naturalistic, the mouth slightly open, the nose long and narrow with slightly flared nostrils. Eyes are almond shaped, may have had inlay that is now gone. The top of the head shows a tiered, "layer cake like" coiffure. The figure has a long and deep crack down the entire length of its left side, from top of the head to the left ankle.
Vili (Kongo)
Power Figure
1845 – 1855
wood, iron nails, blades and fragments, fiber cord |
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.192
Elizabeth Olds
Crabbing
1939
lithograph | paper
Allocated by the U.S. Government Commissioned through the New Deal art projects
1943.99
When Dr. Alexander Fleming, British bacteriologist who had discovered penicillin in 1928, heard in 1940 that Drs. Florey, Chain, and their "team" had isolated the antibiotic and had found it successful when tested on mice for efficary and toxicity, at Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, Oxford, he decided to visit them and see their work. The three men shared a Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1945. Cooperation of British and United States scientists, governments, and institutions developed mass production methods for penicillin; met wartime needs; launched new research. Antibiotics brough about a revolution in the practice of medicine. In the laboratory are: Drs. Fleming, Howard W. Florey, Ernst B. Chain, A.G. Sanders, E.P. Abraham, and Norman G. Heatley.
Robert Thom
The Era of Antibiotics, from "The History of Medicine"
1947 – 1957
oil | canvas
Collection of the University of Michigan Health System, Gift of Pfizer Inc.
UMHS.44
Hasegawa Mitsunobu
A Young Woman Teaching a Boy to Read
1720 – 1740
monochrome woodblock print | paper
Bequest of Margaret Watson Parker
1948/1.199

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Part of 1 Learning Collection

Who Are We? 
I.B. Unit of Inquiry

Where We are in Place and Time
<p>I.B. unit of inquiry&nbsp;</p>

How We Express Ourselves
<p>I.B. Unit of Analysis&nbsp;</p>

How the World Works
<p>I.B. Unit of Inquiry&nbsp;</p>

How We Organize Ourselves
<p>I.B. Units of Inquiry&nbsp;</p>

Sharing the Planet  
<p>I.B. Unit of Inquiry</p>

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Last Updated

July 12, 2018 12:38 p.m.

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