Advanced Search

K-12 Educator
K-12 Student
Museum Visitor
UMMA Docent
UMMA Staff
University Faculty
University Student
Between and Mortarboard


UMMA Object Specific Fields






Query builder

51 Items in this Learning Collection
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object

Copyright
All Rights Reserved ()

Children of Niobe

Accession Number
1983/2.38

Title
Children of Niobe

Artist(s)
Stanley William Hayter

Object Creation Date
1954

Medium & Support
lithograph on paper

Dimensions
25 7/8 in x 19 3/4 in (65.72 cm x 50.17 cm);28 1/16 in x 22 1/16 in (71.28 cm x 56.04 cm);25 7/8 in x 19 3/4 in (65.72 cm x 50.17 cm);19 13/16 in x 11 7/8 in (50.32 cm x 30.16 cm)

Credit Line
Bequest of Jean Paul Slusser

Subject matter
According to Greek mythology, Niobe had seven sons and seven daughters. She boasted about the number of children she had to another woman Letos, whose children included Apollo and Artemis. As a punishment for her hubris, Letos sent her two divine children to kill Niobe's fourteen children. This print, titled Children of Niobe, is significant in Hayter's oeuvre because of its abstract composition. Its abstract linear quality contrasts with his etchings and engravings that were more rounded and varied.

Physical Description
This color lithograph has an abstract composition of thin lines, all about the same width, in red, orange, green, and black. The print is numbered (l.l.) "79/250", titled (l.c.) "Children of Niobe", and signed and dated (l.r.) "S W Hayter 54" in pencil.

Primary Object Classification
Print

Primary Object Type
abstract

Collection Area
Modern and Contemporary

Rights
If you are interested in using an image for a publication, please visit http://umma.umich.edu/request-image for more information and to fill out the online Image Rights and Reproductions Request Form.

Keywords
Figures
Roman
Surrealism
abstraction
children
deaths
linear forms
man
modern and contemporary art
mythology (literary genre)
women

3 Related Resources

Greco-Roman Mythology
(Part of 7 Learning Collections)
Greek Cultural Influence
(Part of 4 Learning Collections)
The Divine Comedy
(Part of 4 Learning Collections)

& Author Notes

All Rights Reserved