Advanced Search

K-12 Educator
K-12 Student
Museum Visitor
UMMA Docent
UMMA Staff
University Faculty
University Student
Between and Mortarboard


UMMA Object Specific Fields






Query builder

I created this exhibition to represent how I feel about the color pink. Growing up, I thought that liking the color pink meant I was a girly girl and couldn't stand up for myself. Now as an adult, I realize that that way of thinking had to do with misogyny and the idea that to be feminine and accept feminine things was weak. I was wrong a child. Loving things that are feminine don't make you weak, but strong. I love the color pink and florals. There's nothing wrong about enjoying things that make you happy. 

I included artworks with a wide range of mediums and time periods to show that women are powerful in every time period and shown in any way. As you take a look through the artwork, think of them and power and beauty. Think Pink. 

10 Items in this Learning Collection
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object

Copyright
All Rights Reserved ()

Grass-Pink

Accession Number
2012/2.14.12

Title
Grass-Pink

Artist(s)
Jeannette Klute

Object Creation Date
1950 - 1954

Medium & Support
dye transfer print on paper

Dimensions
12 in x 9 in (30.48 cm x 22.86 cm)

Credit Line
Gift of Mr. and Mrs. James Agah, Class of 1989 (BBA)

Subject matter
This color photograph of a stem of grass-pink is an original dye transfer print by the artist. Klute was a pioneer of color photography and helped develop the Eastman Kodak Dye Transfer process. She left detailed notes on the conditions under which each photograph in the portfolio was taken. This particular image was taken on July 1 with a Graflex Series D (4 x 5) on Ektacolor film.

This image was one of 50 reproductions included in the 1954 publication of the portfolio Woodland Portraits (Plate 33). These photographs were taken over a three to four year period in Rockport and Cape Ann, Massachusetts, and Bristol, New York. The series was taken without any manipulation and minimal environmental impact, with natural light and depth of field being the primary subjects of the portfolio. Klute draws attention to often overlooked subjects, focusing in on a single plant or animal and abstracting its surroundings.

Physical Description
This color photograph focuses on a stem of pink flowers. The image has a shallow depth of field, creating a soft background in which more of the pink flowers are visible amidst other green and purple foliage.

Primary Object Classification
Photograph

Collection Area
Photography

Rights
If you are interested in using an image for a publication, please visit http://umma.umich.edu/request-image for more information and to fill out the online Image Rights and Reproductions Request Form. Keywords
available light photography
flowers (plant components)
grasses (plants)
nature photography
woodlands (plant communities)

& Author Notes

All Rights Reserved