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Between and Mortarboard


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26 Items in this Learning Collection
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Copyright
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Sailing under the Moonlight

Accession Number
1966/1.91

Title
Sailing under the Moonlight

Artist(s)
Liu Yuanqi (Liu Yüan-ch'i)

Object Creation Date
1555-1632

Medium & Support
album leaf, ink and color on silk

Dimensions
12 5/16 in x 13 7/8 in (31.27 cm x 35.24 cm)

Credit Line
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund

Label copy
Gallery Rotation Winter 2014
Inscription: The wind rustles … Liu Yuanqi
Two seals of the artist
On the paired album leaf: calligraphy, signature, and two seals of Ge Yingtian (active early 17th century)
In China the arts of poetry and painting are inextricably linked. As the great landscape painter Guo Xi (ca. 1000–1090) wrote: “Poetry is an invisible picture and painting is a pictorial poem.” In the upper right of this painting, the Suzhou artist Liu Yuanqi inscribed two lines (The wind ... boat) from a poem by the famous Tang dynasty poet Meng Haoran (689–740):
At dusk in the mountains [I] hear the monkeys’ mournful cries;
Through the night, the vast river flows swiftly.
The wind rustles the foliage on the two banks,
While the moon shines on a solitary boat.
Jiande is not my homeland,
I remember my friends in Yangzhou.
Instantly many streams of tears
Are sent far away to the western shore of the sea.
Facing the painting is another poem composed by the Song master Su Shi (1036–1101) and written here by Liu’s early seventeenth-century contemporary, Ge Yingtian.

Subject matter
In China the arts of poetry and painting are inextricably linked. As the great landscape painter Guo Xi (ca. 1000–1090) wrote: “Poetry is an invisible picture and painting is a pictorial poem.” In the upper right of this painting, the Suzhou artist Liu Yuanqi inscribed two lines (The wind ... boat) from a poem by the famous Tang dynasty poet Meng Haoran (689–740).

Physical Description
Landscape painting album with a poem on the left leaf inscribed by artist Ge Yingdian. The landscape depicts a pagoda and houses in a lush forest near a creak under the misty moon light.

Primary Object Classification
Unbound Work

Primary Object Type
leaf

Additional Object Classification(s)
Painting

Rights
If you are interested in using an image for a publication, please visit http://umma.umich.edu/request-image for more information and to fill out the online Image Rights and Reproductions Request Form.

Keywords
Landscapes
boat
calligraphy
houses
rivers
trees

6 Related Resources

Celestial bodies
(Part of: Natural World)
Ink and Realisms
(Part of: Artist Associations and Art Movements)
Ink and Realisms in China before 1800
(Part of: Artist Associations and Art Movements)
Landscape and Nature, Comparative and Historical
(Part of 3 Learning Collections)
Silk
(Part of: Exchange and Influence on Global Trade Routes)
Travel
(Part of: Exchange and Influence on Global Trade Routes)

& Author Notes

All Rights Reserved