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Homestead

Accession Number
2002/1.196

Title
Homestead

Artist(s)
Blanch Ackers

Object Creation Date
1987-2000

Medium & Support
graphite, colored pencil, crayon, black ink, and marker on white wove paper

Dimensions
12 1/16 in x 17 15/16 in (30.6 cm x 45.6 cm);15 3/16 in x 21 in (38.5 cm x 53.3 cm)

Credit Line
Gift of The Daniel and Harriet Fusfeld Folk Art Collection

Label copy
Blanch Ackers
United States, born 1916
Homestead
1987–2000
Graphite, colored pencil, crayon, ink, and marker on paper
Gift of the Daniel and Harriet Fusfeld Folk Art Collection, 2002/1.196
Ackers, who served as a foster grandparent at Ypsilanti’s Ford Elementary School, was introduced to watercolor painting through the school’s arts activities. In the 1940s, Ackers had moved to the Detroit area with a brother as part of the Great Migration, the mass movement of African Americans from the fields of the American South to the industrial areas of the North in search of employment. Many of Ackers’s images, like Homestead and Yellow Interior (in an adjacent drawer), recall her childhood in rural Arkansas.
(Out of the Ordinary, 2010)
The daughter of a poor Arkansas sharecropper, Ackers moved to the Detroit, Michigan area in 1943 to work in a wartime factory, and then to Ypsilanti, Michigan where she has lived ever since. In 1985, Ackers began to work in the Willow Run School District as part of the Foster Grandparent Program run by Child and Family Services. While working at Ford Elementary School in Ypsilanti, Michigan, Ackers was introduced to drawing and watercolor painting by Christine Hennessy, an art teacher.
Homestead is a farm scene, which recalls her years on her father’s farm. The scene depicts many aspects of rural living with which Ackers would have been familiar from her childhood. Describing her choices of subject matter and style, Ackers says, "I imagine it and I start drawing."
Lindsay Meehan
Modern and Contemporary Art Intern
2002

Primary Object Classification
Drawing

Primary Object Type
landscape

Collection Area
Modern and Contemporary

Rights
If you are interested in using an image for a publication, please visit http://umma.umich.edu/request-image for more information and to fill out the online Image Rights and Reproductions Request Form.

Keywords
Figures
cart
horses
house
wells

9 Related Resources

African American Woman Artists
(Part of 4 Learning Collections)
Children and Childhood
(Part of 7 Learning Collections)
Detroit-Area Artists
(Part of 3 Learning Collections)
Folk, Self-taught, Amateur, and Visionary Art
(Part of 2 Learning Collections)
Work and Workers
(Part of 9 Learning Collections)
Docent Resources for Meleko Mokgosi: Pan-African Pulp Commission
(Part of: Docent Information From Training Continuing Education Sessions)
Docent Materials for Inuit 2: Reflections: An Ordinary Day
(Part of: Docent Information From Training Continuing Education Sessions)

& Author Notes

All Rights Reserved

On display