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Results for classification:"bottle"

241 UMMA Objects (page 1/21)
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Faceted bottle
1100 – 1299
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1961/1.182
A tall stoneware ovoid bottle on a straight footring with a narrow, short, flaring neck and a direct rim. It has four loop handles connecting the neck to shoulder, incised with floral decoration, and the upper half of the body is covered in green, amber, and yellow polychrome glazes. 
Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Bottle
1271 – 1368
Museum purchase for the Paul Leroy Grigaut Memorial Collection
1969/2.152
Many black-glazed vessels of this type were produced in the areas of Jeongok-ri, Uijeongbu-si, and Yeoju-si in Gyeonggi-do in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Made from coarse, colored clay, its black-glazed surface shines like that of porcelain. It has a lot of sand and bubbles on its surface, producing a rough texture, while fragments of other vessels have become embedded in its shoulder section during firing, but its glaze is well fused, producing a smooth sheen.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.211]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Bottle with globular body and funnel-shaped neck
1850 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.242
This bottle is black-glazed on its entire outer surface, including the inner rim. The glaze is well fused, forming a smooth, shiny surface. There are throwing marks on the entire body. The rim, which appears like a cup placed on top of the neck, is designed to stop liquid from spilling when poured. Bottle such as this one were widely used in everyday life.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.211]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Baluster Bottle
1850 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.245
An inkwell made with porcelain has a trianglar shape body and hat-shape lid on top, there is a feather sticking on the hat-shape lid.
Artist Unknown
Woman with Hat and Flowered Pin Inkwell, French porcelain
1875 – 1975
Gift in loving memory of Donald Maxwell Robiner from his family
2010/1.285
Golden color inwell made with brass and metal has a round body; and a lid cover decorated with craftings of flower and a lion's head.
Artist Unknown
Inkwell made of brass paris round, lion's head, beaded sides, floral top
1875 – 1975
Gift in loving memory of Donald Maxwell Robiner from his family
2010/1.287
It has a small straight rim. Abstract flowers is decorated on the shoulder in the cobalt blue. The body shapes octagonal form.<br />
<br />
This white porcelain jar has an octagonal body and is decorated with vignettes in underglaze cobalt blue on the upper part of the shoulder. Its recessed base, created by removing clay from the bottom, retains traces of fine sand support. This angular bottle was shaped using a mold and has a strong sheen. A large number of cracks and contaminants, however, have darkened the surface. The clay is well sintered, forming a sturdy body.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.175]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Small faceted bottle
1850 – 1899
Gift of Mrs. Caroline I. Plumer for the James Marshall Plumer Collection
1977/1.196
Porcelain wine bottle with ten cobalt pigment depicting Chinese Daoist ten symbols of longevity&mdash;sun, cloud, mountain, rock, water, crane, deer, turtle, pine tree, and the mushroom of eternal youth. A blue band rings the foot of the bottle, as well as just below the main register of the body. The ten symbols of longevity design stretches around the bulbous body above, tapering off as the body begins to taper into the tubular neck, culminating in a slightly flared rim.<br />
<br />
This bottle was produced in Bunwon-ri, Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do. It is decorated on the entire surface with ten longevity symbols, including deer, pine trees, and cranes, rendered in underglaze cobalt blue. Ten longevity symbols were frequently chosen to decorate the stationery, bottles, and jars produced in the late 19th century at kilns in Bunwon-ri. This is a high-quality white porcelain bottle, with well sintered clay and glaze and outstanding cobalt blue colouring.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Wine bottle with Ten Symbols of Longevity design
19th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.281
Flask-shaped bottle with short, narrow neck. Bamboo leaves design in brown color is applied on one shoulder toward the bottom. The porous surface of white glaze shows the orange color of the clay. The spout is narrow and has an elevated rim. The foot is short and glazed.
Takuo Katô
Shino ware flask-shaped bottle with bamboo design
1953 – 1963
Museum Purchase
1963/2.69
This dark grayish-blue earthenware vessel is from the Goryeo period. The neck flares out toward the top and the mouth spreads widely out to the side. The neck and body are encircled by two thick incised line. The body has gently sloping sides that flare out and then taper down toward the base.<br />
<br />
This is a grayish black, high-fired stoneware bottle. Its neck splays to form a curved profile, and the edge of its rim is round. The body is widest at its lower part and connected to the neck without a break. Double or triple incised lines run around the body in two places. The section between the neck and the rim shows clear traces of glaze, though this cannot be determined for the rest of the bottle. The center of the base is slightly recessed.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 83]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Bottle
918 – 1392
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.207
This is known as a pear shaped bottle vase with widely everted mouth, narrow neck that makes it easy to grasp and a round globular body that is bottom heavy. Five lines encircle the body and neck. The foot is rather high.<br />
<br />
Bronze bottles, bowls, plates and cutlery were placed as burial ware in Goryeo tombs along with celadon vessels. This bottle has traces of being splashed by muddy water, thus it is assumed to have been excavated from a tomb. This type of bottle with a long neck and flared mouth was also made in celadon in large quantities. The bottle is decorated with three ridges, and between the ridges are incised three thin lines. The mouth was made by folding the metal sheet inwards and joining the folds. The vertical foot has been attached separately. The entire bottle is covered by a thin patina, and part of its body has been ruptured. It, however, retains its original form and has been preserved well. Part of one side, which has been in contact with earth, is more decayed than the rest.
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Pear-Shaped Bottle
13th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.219
<p>This is an intact hair oil bottle; an invaluable source for the information it provides about the form of Goryeo celadon oil bottles. The foot was made by removing the clay from the bottom of the base, while the foot rim shows the trase of glaze having been wiped away and has small grains of sand ahered to it. Glaze was oxidized in parts, yielding a yellow-brown color, and fine crackles are formed on the glazed furace. Glaze was poorly fused and there are glaze runnings on the lower part of the body.<br />
[<em>Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art</em> (2014) p.129]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Small Oil Bottle
1133 – 1166
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.237
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