23 UMMA Objects
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Firescreen consists of a rectangular metal frame with glass and metal elements set in rectangular (largely geometric) framing patterns around a central panel of white and purple vertical glass rods. Along the bottom is a border of white, amber, and green glass circular elements in a more naturalistic pattern evoking grapes.
Louis Comfort Tiffany
Firescreen from the entrance hall of the Henry O. Havemeyer house, New York
1890 – 1891
University purchase 1930, transferred to the Museum of Art
1986.146.10
Near dusk, a woman in a kimono walks outside a Japanese style building with a shoji screen for a wall. The silhouettes of merry-makers inside can be seen, revealing the figure of a man and also a woman, probably a geisha, holding an instrument that appears to be a shamisen.
Takahashi Hiroaki
Evening in Tokyo: Figures in Silhouette behind a Shoji screen
1900 – 1921
Gift of Millard Pryor in Memory of Mary S. Pryor
1991/2.110
This screenprint has a simple, graphic image of a folded piece of paper on a table. The folded paper outline with dark black lines and colored in a beige color. The table is similarly outlined and is colored white. The background is a bright red color. The print is inscribed by the artist in pencil (l.r.).
Patrick Caulfield (British (modern))
Watch me eat, without appetite, à la carte
1973
Gift of Jack A. and Noreen Rounick
2004/2.80.2
2003/1.405.1-4 comprises two sets of four panels of fusuma-e (sliding doors) still in their original frames, with the metal door pulls set into each of the paintings. One side, across all four panels, depicts mandarin ducks and plum trees, by Yokoyama Seiki (1793–1865); and on the reverse is a river landscape by Seiki's pupil, Okajima Seikô (1828–1877).
Yokoyama Seiki and Okajima Seikō;Okajima Seikō
A side: Mandarin ducks and plum trees, by Yokoyama SeikiB side: Lakeside landscape, by Okajima Seikô
1850 – 1865
Gift of Helmut Stern
2003/1.405.4
2003/1.405.1-4 comprises two sets of four panels of fusuma-e (sliding doors) still in their original frames, with the metal door pulls set into each of the paintings. One side, across all four panels, depicts mandarin ducks and plum trees, by Yokoyama Seiki (1793–1865); and on the reverse is a river landscape by Seiki's pupil, Okajima Seikô (1828–1877).
Yokoyama Seiki and Okajima Seikō;Okajima Seikō
A side: Mandarin ducks and plum trees, by Yokoyama SeikiB side: Lakeside landscape, by Okajima Seikô
1850 – 1865
Gift of Helmut Stern
2003/1.405.3
This four panel folding screen depicts eight crows flying through a rain shower. The birds themselves are naturalistcally depicted, while the rain is suggested through Yosa Buson's use of diagonal strokes of various shades of lighter ink washes. Buson makes use of the three-dimensionality of the screen's folds in his placement of the crows, creating a sense of depth and movement to his subject. 
Yosa Buson (Japanese (culture or style))
Crows Flying Through Rain
18th century
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1965/1.177
These panels represent six of the twelve months. The panels each have calligraphy and a red seal in one corner. In each panel there is a bird and a type of plant, which are suggestive of particular months. On the top left panel there is bamboo, the bow of the boat with a small lamp attached to it, and a type of water fowl. In the bottom middle panel is a blooming sakura tree and a pheasant. In the bottom left panel is blue and white wisteria ans small sparrows. In the bottom right panel there is a willow slowly coming back to life after winter over a thatched building.
One of a pair of six-fold screens
19th century
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1965/1.179
The animals are presented in zodiac sequence, from right to left: mouse, ox, tiger, hare, dragon, serpent, horse, goat, monkey, chicken, dog, and boar. The eight-fold screen allows the animals to seem to walk across the space. Negative space plays a significant role in the screen, creating a place for the animals to exist and at the same time extending into the room.
Yoshikawa Kôkei
Animals of the Zodiac (Two of pair)
1924
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
2003/1.383.2
This high-contrast photograph of a nude woman reclining on a bed is taken from a low angle. Her legs appear larger than her torso, which extends into the background. A painting and ornate screen room divider are visible in the interior space behind her.
Bill Brandt (British (modern))
Campden Hill, London
1955
Gift of Two Friends of the Museum
1993/1.42
A monochrome print depicting two standing women and a reclining man in a room. The taller woman, a courtesan, wears an elaborate kimono of butterfly design and under-kimono of geometric patterns; her hair is tied on the back, wearing tortoise shell comb and hairpin. She is holding skirts of kimono and under-kimono with her right hand and is hiding her left hand under the kimono. The second woman, an attendant, is standing behind the courtesan, holding a doll of a boy and her face turning away. She wears a plain kimono with pine tree design and obi (sash) with striped patterns. The man is reclining and looking toward the courtesan. They seem to engage in conversation. The man wears kimono with design of coins and short jacket with plaid patterns. His hair is shaved on top and tied on the back. There is a folded screen behind him, depicting a plum tree by river. In front of him, there are a sake pitcher, sake cup and its stand, and a bowl with food accompanied by a tray and chopsticks. There is a title of the p
Okumura Masanobu
Courtesan and client: parody of the Kiritsubo Chapter of the Tale of Genji (Mitate Genji Kiritsubo)
1711 – 1716
Bequest of Margaret Watson Parker, through Dr. Walter R. Parker
1948/1.198

George Segal (American (North American))
Untitled
1970
Gift of the Marvin Felheim Collection
1983/1.215
This 6-fold screen is a depiction of the Battle of Genji and Heike. In samurai armor, the Heike forces approach by ship from the left, while Genji forces rush to the shore on horseback and on foot—drawing the viewer’s attention to the center of the screens, where their confrontation will finally take place. The Heike forces can be identified by the red banners on their ships, while the Genji clan carries white banners.
Japanese (Japanese (culture or style))
Battle of the Genji and Heike Forces
1573 – 1650
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1964/2.64
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