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Results for credit_line:"Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern"

86 UMMA Objects (page 1/8)
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This western Luba <em>kifwebe</em> (plural, <em>bifwebe</em>), a striated mask with parallel grooves, has a rectangular, box-like form. A dense raffia fiber beard has been tightly bound around the carved wooden face. The mask was crowned by a black and white cock feather headdress (now lost due to damage) that perfectly matched the black and white striations. The vertical and arching lines suggest the mask derives from the Manono region, yet the black and white coloring indicates it originates further northwest in the Kabalo area. Moreover, the mask possesses many stylistic features of Songye <em>bifwebe</em> including the stylization of the eyes, mouth, and saggital crest; however, this mask’s cubic shape makes it markedly different from Songye ones. Here, the mouth protrudes with square, pursed lips, the eyes appear as horizontal slits with slightly overhanging eyebrows, the crest extends from the forehead eventually forming the nose, and the chin is flat and wide. Faint traces of white clay (kaolin) appear
Luba (Luba (culture or style))
Mask
1935 – 1945
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.219
This  stool features an elegantly carved standing female caryatid supporting the seat. It exhibits the characteristic hallmarks of a Southern Hemba style, which in turn was strongly influenced by the neighboring Luba. These traits include the broad, rounded forms of the sculpture, the disproportionately large head, the ovoid face with a subdued expression, a wide convex forehead, the brow ridge defined in relief, half-closed eyes, the elongated nose, the narrow mouth with clenched lips, the protruding abdomen with a pointed umbilicus, scarification patterns on the torso, and a multitude of sculpted bracelets upon both wrists.  Also emblematic of Southern Hemba sculptural forms is the elaborate pulled-back chignon hairstyle (<em>kibanda</em>), which forms a cruciform motif in the rear.  The figure also possesses conical breasts, short squat legs, and flat feet. The tips of the figure’s fingers symbolically carry the circular seat.
Hemba (Hemba (culture or style))
Chief's Stool
1915 – 1925
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.224
This finely detailed, wooden Wongo cup bears three anthropomorphic faces carved in relief: a large, central face and two smaller, diamond-shaped faces to either side. The remaining areas of the body of the cup are completely covered in an elaborate diamond-shape pattern, a characteristic commonly seen in Wongo and Kuba objects. The cup’s faces exhibit the stylistic influence of the neighboring Kuba, as evidenced by the scarifications on the central face that extend from its temples to its ears; the large, triangular nose; and the half closed coffeebean-shaped eyes. The other two faces closely resemble the center face but lack ears and scarifications. The cup has a curved handle while the interior is smooth and polished.
Wongo (Wongo)
Cup
1905 – 1915
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.210
This standing female <em>nkisi mihasi</em>, or “benevolent” power figure, exhibits many of the typical traits associated with the Luba of the Upemba Basin, and more specifically, with the Kisale center of production. These features include a disproportionately elongated torso, terraced coiffure, diamond-shaped scarification patterns covering the abdomen and back, and, a crescent moon symbol on the pubis. In addition, this figure possesses a round head with almond-shaped eyes, an open mouth, flat and level shoulders, protruding breasts and bellybutton, and horizontal lines across its upper thighs. Multiple strands of white, dark blue, and light blue beads adorn the figure’s neck, upper chest, wrist, hips, and ankle. A cotton loincloth has been wrapped around the figure’s hips.
Luba (Luba (culture or style))
Power Figure
1885 – 1895
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.212
This janus, or double-faced carved wooden bust, is characteristic of the eastern Luba style, also known as the Luba-Hemba style. The elongated, ovoid-shaped faces, thin, long noses, and eyes surrounded by ocular cavities are traits typically seen in Hemba figural work.  The motifs on the temples and forehead and the intricate geometric designs decorating the head depict actual Luba scarifications. Both faces closely resemble each other and feature long beards. A round cup sits atop the large, convex head; this cup conceals a cavity in the crown, allowing medicinal substances to be held inside.  Wrapped around the bust’s long neck is a piece of brown cloth that has been held in place by a cord. A hook has been attached to this cord allowing the object to hang undisturbed in order to safeguard it when not in use.
Luba (Luba (culture or style))
Double-Faced Power Figure
1895 – 1905
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.213
This woodcarved figure exhibits elaborate diamond-shaped scarifications throughout the torso and crescent-shaped ones across the pubis; a disproportionately long trunk; and, protruding breasts and umbilicus. With semi-spherical feet, the figure stands with knees slightly bent. Her round head features an angular face; a large, concave forehead; coffeebean-shaped eyes; a triangular nose; a small mouth; and a coiffure styled in cascading tiers. The elbows are bent such that her fingers rest atop the shoulders, adjacent to the breasts.
Luba (Luba (culture or style))
Power Figure
1895 – 1905
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.218
Anthropomorphic whistle with facial features, round torso and two round protrusions extending from the sides of the torso. The piece is hollow. 
Chokwe (Chokwe (culture or style))
Whistle
1915 – 1925
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.202
This hour-glass shaped stool is supported by two caryatid figures who sit in a pose of lamentation&mdash;crouched with head in hands. Scarified patterned abstracted tears spill from their lower eyelids. Brass studs adorn the perimeter of the stool&rsquo;s seat, base, and figures. Both figures wear strings of black, red and white beads around their necks.
Chokwe (Chokwe (culture or style))
Caryatid stool
1850 – 1899
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.204
This carved wooden figure depicts a standing female, and is one of a pair that includes a male figure also carved by the same hand. According to noted art historian Niangi Batulukisi, these two figures deviate from the classical Bembe style and are “an extreme rarity” due to the fact that they are likely connected to an ancient pre-Bembe style.<br /><br />
The female figure’s trunk is disproportionately long, while the legs appear stockier and are slightly flexed at the knees. Her facial features include narrow eyes set in round, ocular cavities and an open mouth. The hairstyle is of a simple design. The breasts and the umbilicus protrude outward, the shoulders curve inward, and the palms of the hand rest upon either side of the abdomen. Traces of tukula powder can be found upon the figure’s surface.<br /><br />
It is almost certain that the female figure’s torso was at one point wrapped with medicinal ingredients, just like her male counterpart. Moreover, a hole appears on the crown of her head, likely inten
Bembe (Bembe (Kongo))
Female Figure
1865 – 1875
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.196.1
Kneeling human figure on top of a round, hollowed out base, suggesting that this may have been the top of a staff or flywhisk. The sculpture holds one hand on his thigh, while he is chewing on a munkwiza root with the other. 
Yombe (Yombe (culture or style))
Figure
1855 – 1865
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.185
Seated figure with crossed legs. The figure is holding an undecorated cup. He is wearing a vest and hat and is holding one hand to his chest. The figure sits on a stool, which rests on a drum. 
Yombe (Yombe (culture or style))
Seated Figure
1880 – 1890
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.186
This Hemba <em>adze</em>, or chief’s ceremonial ax, is decorated with an elegantly carved female head upon the end of its smooth handle while an iron blade has been lodged into its oval base. This <em>adze</em> exhibits the characteristic hallmarks of a Southern Hemba style, which in turn was strongly influenced by the neighboring Luba. The head bears an elongated, oviod-shaped face, a wide convex forehead, coffeebean-shaped eyes within ocular recesses, a triangular nose, and full lips. An elaborate pulled-back hairstyle in the form of a chignon (<em>kibanda</em>), features a cruciform motif. Four brass tacks that have been inserted into the extreme top, bottom, left and right points of the face echo this crucifix shape.
Hemba (Hemba (culture or style))
Prestige Adze
1875 – 1885
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.225
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