36 UMMA Objects
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The first panel depicts 5 individuals. The oldest person is centered in the middle with two younger people above him, with the one on the right holding what appears to be a cane or stick. The old man looks to be carrying the two individuals. Below him are much younger individuals both appearing to hang onto the older individual. The one on the left is grabbing his leg while the right individual appears to grab his midsection. In the left corner is a pot fallen on its side. The upper left includes an inscription in black and red ink.&nbsp;<br />
The second panel is of 2 individuals, one appearing to paint on a piece of pottery while the other individual watches.&nbsp;<br />
The third panel shows a plum tree with a small red inscription on the left.<br />
The fourth panel is of bamboo with a small inscription in red ink to the bottom right.&nbsp;<br />
The fifth panel depicts a pine tree with a faint mountain in the background.<br />
The sixth panel depicts one man with a bun and an inscription on the uppe
Ikeno Taiga
Scholarly Occupations and The Three Friends (Pine, Plum, Bamboo)
18th century
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1961/1.174
This 6-fold screen is a depiction of the Battle of Genji and Heike. In samurai armor, the Heike forces approach by ship from the left, while Genji forces rush to the shore on horseback and on foot—drawing the viewer’s attention to the center of the screens, where their confrontation will finally take place. The Heike forces can be identified by the red banners on their ships, while the Genji clan carries white banners.
Japanese (Japanese (culture or style))
Battle of the Genji and Heike Forces
1573 – 1650
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1964/2.64
Description provided in&nbsp;(1974/1.251)
Matsumura Goshun
Life in the Mountains
1781
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1974/1.252
<p>&quot;The&nbsp;present&nbsp;screens&nbsp;present&nbsp;similar&nbsp;but&nbsp;separate landscape compositions. In&nbsp;the&nbsp;first&nbsp;panel&nbsp;on&nbsp;the&nbsp;right&nbsp;side, a&nbsp;path emerges&nbsp;and&nbsp;passes&nbsp;an&nbsp;empty&nbsp;roadside&nbsp;pavilion.&nbsp;Farther along, three&nbsp;men&nbsp;are&nbsp;strolling, two&nbsp;of&nbsp;them&nbsp;with&nbsp;hoes,&nbsp;as they return&nbsp;from&nbsp;work&nbsp;in&nbsp;the&nbsp;fields.&nbsp;Just&nbsp;ahead&nbsp;is&nbsp;a&nbsp;house&nbsp;where several&nbsp;people&nbsp;converse.&nbsp;Beyond&nbsp;is&nbsp;a&nbsp;valley&nbsp;with&nbsp;several homes&nbsp;and&nbsp;rice&nbsp;paddies.&nbsp;The&nbsp;scene&nbsp;ends&nbsp;with&nbsp;the&nbsp;path crossing&nbsp;over&nbsp;a&nbsp;small&nbsp;bridge&nbsp;by&nbsp;more&nbsp;rice&nbsp;paddies.&nbsp;These drained&nbsp;fields&nbsp;indicate&nbsp;that&nbsp;the&nbsp;season&nbsp;is&nbsp;early&nbsp;autumn after&nbsp;the&nbsp;rice&nbsp;has&nbsp;been&nbsp;harvested&nbsp;and&nbsp;the&nbsp;earth&nbsp;prepared for&nbsp;winter.<br />
Matsumura Goshun
Life in the Mountains
1781
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1974/1.251
Among a gold and bright mineral pigmented landscape, Genji stands below a cherry tree in full bloom and watches Murasaki, who stands in an architectural structure. A distant stream and hilltops indicate the isolated setting.
Kanō Tsunenobu
Genji espies Murasaki for the first time, from the Wakamurasaki chapter of The Tale of Genji
1670 – 1680
Museum Purchase made possible by the Friends of the Museum of Art
2002/1.168
The animals are presented in zodiac sequence, from right to left: mouse, ox, tiger, hare, dragon, serpent, horse, goat, monkey, chicken, dog, and boar. The eight-fold screen allows the animals to seem to walk across the space. Negative space plays a significant role in the screen, creating a place for the animals to exist and at the same time extending into the room.
Yoshikawa Kôkei
Animals of the Zodiac (Two of pair)
1924
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
2003/1.383.2
This six-fold screen, a half of a pair, is meant to represent six of the twelve months of the year, with keen attention paid to the birds and flowers associated with each. Although this screen bears Kano Tan&rsquo;yu&rsquo;s signature, it was probably created by his studio or by followers working in this famous artist&rsquo;s style.
One of a pair of six-fold screens
19th century
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1965/1.178
This four panel folding screen depicts eight crows flying through a rain shower. The birds themselves are naturalistcally depicted, while the rain is suggested through Yosa Buson's use of diagonal strokes of various shades of lighter ink washes. Buson makes use of the three-dimensionality of the screen's folds in his placement of the crows, creating a sense of depth and movement to his subject. 
Yosa Buson (Japanese (culture or style))
Crows Flying Through Rain
18th century
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1965/1.177
These panels represent six of the twelve months. The panels each have calligraphy and a red seal in one corner. In each panel there is a bird and a type of plant, which are suggestive of particular months. On the top left panel there is bamboo, the bow of the boat with a small lamp attached to it, and a type of water fowl. In the bottom middle panel is a blooming sakura tree and a pheasant. In the bottom left panel is blue and white wisteria ans small sparrows. In the bottom right panel there is a willow slowly coming back to life after winter over a thatched building.
One of a pair of six-fold screens
19th century
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1965/1.179
A six panel folding screen depicting pairs of carp on each of the lower portions of each panel, and lotus blossoms.
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Lotus and Carp
19th century
Museum purchase made possible by the Director's Acquisition Committee, 2014
2014/2.202
Painted with ink on paper this is the second pair of six-fold screens&nbsp;(the first being 1988/2.29.1). To the left is a mountainous region with the water on the right. The mountains on the left have a trail that snakes through them and five travelers who walk the path. On the right is the open water with three boats. The two areas meet in the middle, more towards the left, at a rough and rocky coast. On the far left edge is an inscription followed by a red seal.&nbsp;
Kanô Sengen
Landscape at the foot of Mt. Fuji
1820
Museum purchase made possible by a gift from Helmut Stern
1988/2.29.2
&quot;The&nbsp;panels&nbsp;of&nbsp;these&nbsp;screens&nbsp;alternate&nbsp;human&nbsp;figures&nbsp;and plants.&nbsp;The&nbsp;figures&nbsp;illustrate&nbsp;various&nbsp;activities&nbsp;of&nbsp;the scholar&#39;s&nbsp;life.&quot;<br />
On the first panel of the right screen, &quot;a rotund scholar&nbsp;sits&nbsp;on&nbsp;the&nbsp;ground&nbsp;viewing&nbsp;the&nbsp;waterfall&nbsp;described&nbsp;in the&nbsp;poem [&quot;Requesting&nbsp;Ts&#39;ui&nbsp;Shan-jen&#39;s Painting&nbsp;of&nbsp;the&nbsp;Waterfall&nbsp;at&nbsp;the&nbsp;Thousand-foot&nbsp;Cliff&quot; by Li Po], while&nbsp;his&nbsp;young&nbsp;assistant, who&nbsp;is&nbsp;holding&nbsp;the&nbsp;painting&nbsp;up&nbsp;on&nbsp;a&nbsp;rod,&nbsp;peeps&nbsp;around&nbsp;the&nbsp;edge&nbsp;of&nbsp;the&nbsp;scroll. &quot;<br />
&quot;The&nbsp;next&nbsp;panel&nbsp;has&nbsp;a&nbsp;bold&nbsp;composition&nbsp;of&nbsp;flowering&nbsp;plum branches.&nbsp;The&nbsp;wide&nbsp;brush&nbsp;strokes&nbsp;of&nbsp;the&nbsp;limbs&nbsp;are&nbsp;typical&nbsp;of Taiga&#39;s&nbsp;technique&nbsp
Ikeno Taiga
Scholarly Occupations and The Three Friends (Pine, Plum, Bamboo)
18th century
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1961/1.175
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