37 UMMA Objects
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This is a painting of chrysanthemums on a two-fold screen. The paper is sprinkled with gold and the flowers are painted in ink and light color. The flowers come out of the corners and edges of the screen and spread into the center of the screen. There is a lot of negative space filled in by the gold in the background. A signature is in the middle followed by two seals. There is a third seal in the center of the other screen. 
Ikeno Taiga
Orchids and Chrysanthemums
18th century
Given in memory of Calvin L. French by Fina and John E. Bardach
1986/2.10

Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
One of Four-panel Screen Depicting the Seasons
1867 – 1899
Gift of S.W. Hoobler in memory of his parents, Madge Sibley, BA 1904, and Doctor B. Raymond Hoobler
1982/2.41.1
6-fold screen decorated with ink, color and gold pigment on paper. This screen is a part of a pair. It's partner depicts a lion dance.
Japanese (Japanese (culture or style))
Monkey Dance Under White Plum Blossoms (pair with Lion Dance, 1987/1.363.1)
1730 – 1740
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1987/1.363.2

Japanese (Japanese (culture or style))
Scene from the Tale of Genji
1615 – 1868
Gift of Willard A. and Marybelle Bouchard Hanna
1991/2.30
A 6-fold screen with painted ink designs of a scene depicting trees, mountains, and clouds.
Japanese (Japanese (culture or style))
White Clouds and Red Trees
1940 – 1950
Gift of the Estate of Emily Jameson
1996/2.18
2003/1.405.1-4 comprises two sets of four panels of fusuma-e (sliding doors) still in their original frames, with the metal door pulls set into each of the paintings. One side, across all four panels, depicts mandarin ducks and plum trees, by Yokoyama Seiki (1793–1865); and on the reverse is a river landscape by Seiki's pupil, Okajima Seikô (1828–1877).
Yokoyama Seiki and Okajima Seikō;Okajima Seikō
A side: Mandarin ducks and plum trees, by Yokoyama SeikiB side: Lakeside landscape, by Okajima Seikô
1850 – 1865
Gift of Helmut Stern
2003/1.405.4
2003/1.405.1-4 comprises two sets of four panels of fusuma-e (sliding doors) still in their original frames, with the metal door pulls set into each of the paintings. One side, across all four panels, depicts mandarin ducks and plum trees, by Yokoyama Seiki (1793–1865); and on the reverse is a river landscape by Seiki's pupil, Okajima Seikô (1828–1877).
Yokoyama Seiki and Okajima Seikō;Okajima Seikō
A side: Mandarin ducks and plum trees, by Yokoyama SeikiB side: Lakeside landscape, by Okajima Seikô
1850 – 1865
Gift of Helmut Stern
2003/1.405.3
This four panel folding screen depicts eight crows flying through a rain shower. The birds themselves are naturalistcally depicted, while the rain is suggested through Yosa Buson's use of diagonal strokes of various shades of lighter ink washes. Buson makes use of the three-dimensionality of the screen's folds in his placement of the crows, creating a sense of depth and movement to his subject. 
Yosa Buson (Japanese (culture or style))
Crows Flying Through Rain
18th century
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1965/1.177
This six-fold screen, a half of a pair, is meant to represent six of the twelve months of the year, with keen attention paid to the birds and flowers associated with each. Although this screen bears Kano Tan’yu’s signature, it was probably created by his studio or by followers working in this famous artist’s style.
One of a pair of six-fold screens
19th century
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1965/1.178
These panels represent six of the twelve months. The panels each have calligraphy and a red seal in one corner. In each panel there is a bird and a type of plant, which are suggestive of particular months. On the top left panel there is bamboo, the bow of the boat with a small lamp attached to it, and a type of water fowl. In the bottom middle panel is a blooming sakura tree and a pheasant. In the bottom left panel is blue and white wisteria ans small sparrows. In the bottom right panel there is a willow slowly coming back to life after winter over a thatched building.
One of a pair of six-fold screens
19th century
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1965/1.179

Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Folding Coromandel Screen (Six-Panels)
1700 – 1999
Bequest from the Estate and Trust of Elise Reeder Olton
2014/1.619C
Among a gold and bright mineral pigmented landscape, Genji stands below a cherry tree in full bloom and watches Murasaki, who stands in an architectural structure. A distant stream and hilltops indicate the isolated setting.
Kanō Tsunenobu
Genji espies Murasaki for the first time, from the Wakamurasaki chapter of The Tale of Genji
1670 – 1680
Museum Purchase made possible by the Friends of the Museum of Art
2002/1.168
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