372 UMMA Objects
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Container made by turning a single piece of wood on a lathe. Lid is crowned with mushroom-shaped knob, and shoulder is formed around mouth to support lid. The lid and body are ribbed. A letter resembling the Chinese character &#39;mok&#39; meaning wood or tree is written in onk on the base of the container. The inside shows traces of having been carved with a knife.<br />
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These containers were made by turning single pieces of wood on a lathe. Their lids are crowned with mushroom-shaped knobs, and shoulder is formed around the mouth to support the lid. Plate 345 (UA2004.60) is decorated with sets of double concentric circles at two places of the upper surface of its lid, and at one place around its side. Also around the body are carved two sets of double circles, and the container is painted with red ocher. Meanwhile, the lid and the body of plate 346 (UA2004.61) are ribbed. A letter resembling the Chinese character &ldquo;mok (木: wood or tree)&rdquo; is written in ink on the base of this container. I
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Incense container
19th century
Gift and partial purchase from Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp, purchase with funds from Elder and Mrs Sang-Yong Nam
2021/1.161

Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Jewelry Chest
1767 – 1799
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.310

Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Christmas Eve, Seoul Anglican Cathedral
1965
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.319
Inlaying silver into ironware was a popular method of decorating metalwork that required high levels of skill. Numerous items were produced with inlay decorations. The entire lid and body of this hexagonal case are decorated with inlaid silver. The lid features a hexagonal design in its center surrounded by a continuous four-leaf flower design. The six sides of the body are decorated by three pairs of turtle designs, crane designs and deer designs, arranged alternately. The lid and body are bordered with a fret-patterned band. This case with a flat base is excellently preserved. This type of iron-lidded case with inlaid silver design was produced in large quantities from the nineteenth century to the early twentieth century, continuing through the Japanese annexation of the Korean Peninsula. Such cases are mostly octagonal; this is a rare hexagonal example.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017), 244]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Hexagonal Tobacco Box with Lid
1850 – 1950
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.280A&B
A square porcelain water dropper. The porcelain is white and there is an image of a lizard or dragon on the top. Clouds are depicted on the sides with the image of a flying crane on the front of the square. The white glaze has chipped of or is thin in places, revealing the copper underglaze.<br />
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This is a cubic water dropper featuring an openwork design of a crane with wings spread on the upper face. The spout is in the shape of a newt; it is designed in the way that water drops from the mouth of the newt. The side walls feature cloud designs in copper red which were blackened during firing. The entire foot was glazed, but the glaze was wiped away from the foot, on which were placed fine sand support during firing.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.182]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
White Porcelain Square Water Dropper with Openwork Cloud and Crane Design
1867 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.279
An instrument consisting of a hollow sound box, a bamboo beck, two pegs in the upper neck wound with strings, two strings, and a bow. The sound box is made of sanyuja wood.<br />
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This is a traditional Korean musical instrument with two strings. Sound is produced by the friction between strings made from several strands of thin silk thread and bowstrings made of horsehair. Its unique sound has earned the haegeum alternative, onomatopoeic names such as gaenggaengi and aenggeum. The instrument consists of a hollow sound box, a bamboo neck, two pegs in the upper neck each wound with a string, the strings themselves, and a separate bow. The pegs are currently detached from the neck. The sound box is made of sanyuja wood (Xylosma congestum).
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 288]</p>
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Two-stringed Fiddle (Haegum)
1850 – 1950
Gift and partial purchase from Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp, purchase with funds from Elder and Mrs Sang-Yong Nam
2021/1.159
Brass is an alloy of copper and tin. Brassware objects generally include ritual bowls, tableware for aristocrats, incense burners, braziers, and spoons. The UMMA collection does not include a complete set of dining or ritual implements but individual items including four water bowls (daejeop ), five rice bowls (jubal ), seven kimchi bowls (bosigi ), six side-dish bowls (jaengcheop ), one sauce dish (jongji ), and four spoons. It is assumed that these items were produced during the modern era. All of them were formerly part of the Bruce Hasenkamp collection.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017), 248]</p>
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Brass Serving Spoon (one of a pair)
1900 – 1950
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.306.1
The form of this bottle is unusual in that its body and neck are almost the same length. The glaze is partially oxidized, producing an orange tint, while the surface shows contamination by impurities and pinholes, and cracks are formed towards the foot. The bottle is glossy overall, but the glaze was unevenly applied and has run in some parts. The clay has a high kaolin content, and the bottle has thin, light walls. White porcelain of this kind was produced in Yanggu-gun, Gangwon-do, and Cheongsong-gun, Gyeongsangbuk-do.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.206]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Buncheong ware bottle with globular body and funnel-shaped neck
1900 – 1950
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.295
This bowl is decorated with foliage designs on the inner and outer surfaces, belonging to the type of bowl produced in large quantities during the late 19th century. This kind of design was also applied to the white porcelain produced at kilns in Fujian Province of China and in Arita in Japan. It has corase sand spur marks on the rim of the foot, and the coarse sand also stuck to the inner base indicates that the bowl was fired as part of a stack. It was repaired after being broken into six pieces. It is presumed that the bowl was collected from the waste deposite at a kiln site and restored.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.164]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Blue-and-white bowl with pine tree designs
1850 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.289
This carp-shaped water dropper is unique in that its tail is larger than those of many similar vessels. The vessel was entirely glazed including the base and retains wide marks of refractory spurs in three places. This is one of many figurative water droppers produced in large quantities within the vicinity of Bunwon-ri, Gwangju-si, and Yeoju-si in Gyeonggi-do in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.184]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Blue-and-White Water Dropper in the shape of a fish
1850 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.287

Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Pear-shaped ewer in the Goryeo style
1867 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.301A&B
This is a ritual bowl with a high foot. A same type of this bowl is found in the storeroom of Changdeokgung Palace. It was coated with the transparent glaze with pale blue tints. The glazed surface is impeccable. The qualities of the clay and glaze suggest that this bowl was produced at the kiln in Bunwon-ri, Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do in the late 19th century, the last official court kiln of the Joseon Dynasty.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.194]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Deep bowl on high foot
19th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.300
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