372 UMMA Objects
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The cover has a button-shaped knob at the top and is mostly plain. The mounted bowl has a outward-turned rim. This type of mounted bowl may be deated to sometime in the early 5th century.<br />
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This is a blue-gray, high-fired stoneware lidded stem cup. The shape of the lid is similar to that of the Korean letter &lsquo;ㅏ&rsquo; and is crowned with a ring-shaped knob. The cup&rsquo;s flange slopes inwards and has a sharp edge, while the gallery that supports the lid protrudes slightly. The trumpet-shaped pedestal is perforated in four places by rectangular openings and has a slightly thick bottom edge.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 61]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Covered bowl on cut-out pedestal foot
5th century
Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Millard H. Pryor
1969/1.98A&B
Stoneware jar with natural ash glaze, squat body and lid. Along the widest horizontal stretch is a design of incised concentric circles, with another row above consisting of circles comprised of a pattern of impressions marking the edge of each circle. The convex curve of the lid also contains a row of incised concentric circles, before sloping into a concave valley, and rising up again to a small plateau. It is on this landing that a cintamani style knob rests.<br />
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This is a dark blue-gray, high-fired stoneware lidded bowl with a stamped design. The lid features a pearl-shaped knob at its center and gently slopes down from its flat upper part. A row of double circles encircles upper part of the lid, with the circles in irregular positions. The bowl is widest in its upper part, while its flange slopes steeply inwards. Two thinly incised horizontal lines encircle the upper part of the body. Above these is a row of circles made of engraved dots, while between them is a row of double circles encirclin
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Cinerary urn with concentric circles design
600 – 799
Gift of Mrs. Caroline I. Plumer for the James Marshall Plumer Collection
1973/2.34A&B
An instrument consisting of a hollow sound box, a bamboo beck, two pegs in the upper neck wound with strings, two strings, and a bow. The sound box is made of sanyuja wood.<br />
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This is a traditional Korean musical instrument with two strings. Sound is produced by the friction between strings made from several strands of thin silk thread and bowstrings made of horsehair. Its unique sound has earned the haegeum alternative, onomatopoeic names such as gaenggaengi and aenggeum. The instrument consists of a hollow sound box, a bamboo neck, two pegs in the upper neck each wound with a string, the strings themselves, and a separate bow. The pegs are currently detached from the neck. The sound box is made of sanyuja wood (Xylosma congestum).
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 288]</p>
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Two-stringed Fiddle (Haegum)
1850 – 1950
Gift and partial purchase from Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp, purchase with funds from Elder and Mrs Sang-Yong Nam
2021/1.159
A tall chest with four main cabinet doors, two on top and two on bottom, and four smaller drawers on the top. Each door is fitted with brass hinges and accent pieces. The wood is multi colored, light brown and dark brown.<br />
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Produced to store clothes, chests were generally kept in the lady&rsquo;s quarter (<em>anbang</em> ) of a house and used by women. The front panels are made from persimmon wood, while the top, sides and back are made from pine wood. The top panel is made from a single piece of wood with moldings attached to give a sleek design. The side panels extend to the back, and the back panel was joined to the side panels at a perpendicular angle. The top and side panels are joined by three tenons and mortises. The rail of the first and second levels are attached to the side panels by mortise-and-tenon joints. The borders of the doors on the first level are inlaid with blacklines. Rim decoration <em>ogeumte</em> has been added to the part under the lower crossbar which is supported by a
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Chest
1795 – 1805
Gift of Ellen Johnston Laing
2017/2.125

Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Bowl
Gift of Ellen Johnston Laing
2017/2.127
This mirror features designs of two birds, coupled with floral motifs, positioned symmetrically on the left and right sides. Eight-foiled barbed bronze mirror is general. This type is a modified form of that.<br />
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This blue-green bronze mirror decorated with a double crane design is excellently cast. It is five-lobed, and the registers are also divided by five-lobe shaped ridge. The outer register is decorated with scroll design while the inner register is adorned with a pair of cranes, with wings spread and heads turned right, arranged on either side of the central suspension loop against the honeysuckle scroll background. This object may be compared to other crane-patterned mirrors excavated from the Geumcheondong site tomb in Cheongju, Chungcheongbuk-do Province.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017), 240]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Domed boss surrounded by raised band and dots, field of two phoenixes among flowers and vines, raised border with floral motif and five-lobed edges on both sides.
918 – 1392
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1965/2.61
One box with a lid completely encompassing it. The lid has a red and black exterior and an interior with a geometric design in orange and blue hues. The box has the same geometric design on the interior and exterior.
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Nesting Sewing Box (One of Set)
20th century
Gift of Keum Ja and Byung Schick Kang
2018/1.325.1A-B
Lidded box covered in paper. The exterior is decorated with flowers and butterflies in green, red, and gold. There are no designs on the interior. It is the middle of three nesting boxes.
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Nesting Sewing Box (Two of Set)
20th century
Gift of Keum Ja and Byung Schick Kang
2018/1.326.2A-B
Lidded box covered in paper. The exterior is decorated with flowers and butterflies in green, red, and gold. There are no designs on the interior paper. The smallest of three nesting boxes.
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Nesting Sewing Box (Three of Set)
20th century
Gift of Keum Ja and Byung Schick Kang
2018/1.326.3A-B
This is a rubbing of a figure with the head of an ox dressed in robes. It appears to be holding a staff in its right hand.<br />
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<p>These rubbings are taken from reliefs of the twelve Chinese zodiac animal deities on the surface of guardian rocks (&egrave;&shy;&middot;&ccedil;&Yuml;&sup3;, hoseok ) placed around the edge of the tumulus of General Kim Yusin (&eacute;&Dagger;&lsquo;&aring;&ordm;&frac34;&auml;&iquest;&iexcl;, 595&acirc;&euro;&ldquo;673) on Songhwasan Mountain (&aelig;&frac34;&egrave;&Scaron;&plusmn;&aring;&plusmn;&plusmn;) in Gyeongju, Gyeongsangbuk-do Province. The twelve animal deities guard the twelve Earthly Branches which can be interpreted as spatial directions. Each animal deity has the face of a certain animal and a body of human. The twelve animal deities occur in the following order according to the Chinese zodiac: rat, ox, tiger, rabbit, dragon, snake, horse, sheep, monkey, rooster, dog, and pig. While the twelve deities on guardian stones placed around royal tumuli from the
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Twelve Zodiac Animals: Ox
1945 – 1980
Transfer from the Department of the History of Art, Slide and Photograph Collection, gift of Mrs. Pilsoon L. Chun
2021/1.128.2

Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Twelve Zodiac Animals: Horse
1945 – 1980
Transfer from the Department of the History of Art, Slide and Photograph Collection, gift of Mrs. Pilsoon L. Chun
2021/1.128.7
This is a rubbing of a figure with the head of a dragon dressed in robes. Figure is holding a sword in its left hand and the right hand is pressed to the chest.<br />
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<p>These rubbings are taken from reliefs of the twelve Chinese zodiac animal deities on the surface of guardian rocks (&egrave;&shy;&middot;&ccedil;&Yuml;&sup3;, hoseok ) placed around the edge of the tumulus of General Kim Yusin (&eacute;&Dagger;&lsquo;&aring;&ordm;&frac34;&auml;&iquest;&iexcl;, 595&acirc;&euro;&ldquo;673) on Songhwasan Mountain (&aelig;&frac34;&egrave;&Scaron;&plusmn;&aring;&plusmn;&plusmn;) in Gyeongju, Gyeongsangbuk-do Province. The twelve animal deities guard the twelve Earthly Branches which can be interpreted as spatial directions. Each animal deity has the face of a certain animal and a body of human. The twelve animal deities occur in the following order according to the Chinese zodiac: rat, ox, tiger, rabbit, dragon, snake, horse, sheep, monkey, rooster, dog, and pig. While the twelve deities on guardian ston
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Twelve Zodiac Animals: Dragon
1945 – 1980
Transfer from the Department of the History of Art, Slide and Photograph Collection, gift of Mrs. Pilsoon L. Chun
2021/1.128.5
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