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Results for artist_nationality:"Korean (culture or style)"

333 UMMA Objects (page 1/28)
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This grayish-blue stoneware jar has a globular body and short, a little flared neck. The surface of the body is encircled with a lot of thin incised lines. The base is a little flat.<br />
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This is a dark gray, short-necked, high-fired stoneware jar with a flat bottom. The edge of the rim is round, and the inner surface of the neck is slightly tapered below the rim. The body is at its widest in the central part, while the flat base is rounded where it meets the body and is slightly indented at the edges. The entire body shows traces of rotation and water smoothing, with uneven surfaces resulting from rough water smoothing particularly visible on the lower part. The base also shows traces of having been pared and rubbed.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 50]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Storage Jar with wide mouth and everted rim
6th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.173
Tall hourglass-shaped stand. Composed of three separate parts: two bowls and a connecting cylinder. The pieces are unified with appliqu&eacute;d bands encircling the cylinder horizontally as well as evenly spaced cut-out shapes of rectangles and triangles leading up the stand vertically in lines.<br />
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This is a dark grayish brown, cylindrical, high-fired stoneware vessel stand. Parts of the bowl-shaped section have a yellowish brown tint. The walls of the vessel are relatively thick and have a coarse texture. The upper part of the neck has a flared profile, but its rim slopes inwards. The cylindrical neck is divided into three sections by thick double raised bands. In each section of the neck are rectangular perforations that are vertically aligned with those of the other sections. The bell-shaped pedestal is divided into three sections by thin raised bands and has perforations vertically aligned with those of the cylindrical neck. Only the perforations of the uppermost section of the pedestal are t
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Tall Ceremonial Stand for Jar
5th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.178
This grayish-blue stoneware jar has a globular body and short, flared neck. The entire surface of the body is adorned with wave pattern and encircled with many thin incised lines. The base is flat.<br />
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This is a dark gray, long-necked, high-fired stoneware jar with a wide mouth. Its neck is widely flared, while an olive brown natural glaze has formed on the inner surface of the neck and on the shoulder. Shallow incised horizontal lines encircle the outer surface of the neck. The neck shows traces of rotation and water smoothing. The body is widest at its upper-middle part, and a series of incised horizontal lines surrounds the body in three places in its upper part. The areas in between these lines are decorated with wave designs created by combs with many teeth. The vessel originally featured a paddled pattern consisting of diagonally parallel lines along the upper-middle part of the body, and a diagonal crosshatch paddled pattern right below. However, these designs were erased by subsequent rotat
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Cord-marked round-bottomed jar with wide, flared mouth
400 – 532
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.166
It has a outward-turned rim. The side of the body is becoming narrow in the base. The bottem is flat.<br />
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This yellowish brown, bowl-shaped, low-fired earthenware vessel is made from fine clay mixed with fine sand particles. It has no neck. The mouth is slightly everted while the rim is generally flat and features some grooves. The body is widest towards the upper-middle section, and the flat base is rounded where it joins the body. Parts of the vessel feature a paddled pattern which suggests that the surface was first paddled and then smoothed with water on a rotary device.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 44]<br />
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Bowl with flat bottom and flat rolled rim
298 – 299
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.160
Earthenware roof tile-end with molded lotus design.<br />
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This gray, high-fired earthenware convex eave-end roof tile features a slender thirteenpetal lotus design. It is made from coarse clay mixed with small stone particles. The circular ovary and lotus seeds are depicted in shallow relief, while the lotus petals are slender and lack volume.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p.36]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Roof Tile-End with Lotus Design
567 – 599
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.196
Earthenware roof tile-end with molded floral pattern.<br />
The floral medallion on this tile-end consists of bosanghwa(Buddhist floral pattern) motifs which has four heart-shaped petals. The rim is decorated with a chain of beads.<br />
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This dark gray, high-fired earthenware convex eave-end roof tile is decorated with a palmette motif consisting of four petals of a flower in full bloom. Also referred to as the bosanghwa (寶相華, Ch. baoxianghua , a mythical flower often used as a Buddhist decorative motif ), this motif is arranged around a central ovary. Traces of trimming and smoothing with water are visible on the sides of the tile. Traces of clay used to attach this tile to a flat tile can also be seen on the joints.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 39]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Roof Tile-End with Floral Medallion Design
700 – 899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.200
<p>This celadon bowl is undecorated. The glaze is poorly fused and is generally opaque. The foot is low and displays traces of sand supports. The sand, stuck to the foot and the outer base, suggests that the bowl was placed on the kiln floor during ring. Glaze had run down to the outer wall of the foot and accumulated, in parts.<br />
[<em>Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art</em> (2014) p.97]</p>
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shallow bowl, grey color, sanf grit on foot, made in Boryung kiln of ching chung nam-do, often found in tombs in Kangwa Island, 13th century, diameter 6+13/16 inches, height: 1+7/8 inches
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Kanghwa Bowl
12th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.212
<p>The inner surface of this bowl features an incised design of two parrots with long tails resembling phoenixes. e entire body of the bowl was glazed including the rim of the foot, on which remain three quartzite spur marks. Although some fireclay has fallen inside the kiln during ring and adhered to the inner surface of the bowl, the state of sintering is good. The piece as a whole is a high-quality ware with a glossy surface and a fine color of glaze. The base of the foot is cracked which occurred while drying before the application of glaze.<br />
[<em>Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art </em>(2014) p.94]</p>
high quality, incised, double-parrot motif shallow bowl, nice shallow fully glazed foot, three spur marks, firing discoloration, kiln trash fall on glaze, 11th century.
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Bowl with incised pattern of paired phoenixes
1067 – 1132
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.215
It is a earthenware with a man riding a small horse with short legs over a thick rectangle plate. There is a lamp-oil container with hole over the hips of the horse, and a spout sticks out in the front breast of the horse, which enables to pour out water through the inside of the stomach of horse. The figure on the horse wears a triangular hat and armor. The left arm is disappeared.<br />
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Oil Lamp in the Shape of an Equestrian Warrior
500 – 549
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.187
<p>The cup has a mouth that curves slightly inwards; this is a form typical of round cups with saucers produced in large numbers in the 13th and 14th centuries. The cup is decorated only on the outer rim with a fret-patterned band. Repaired damage is visible on several parts on the mouth, as well as cracking that occurred during ring. Glaze has been applied down to the foot, and three quartzite spur marks remain on the outer base. The partially oxidized body displays darker patches on the surface, but it preserves a bright celadon color overall.<br />
[<em>Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art </em>(2014) p.120]</p>
The celadon cup has a mildly inverted rim with curved sides that are bent once, at a sharp angle, near the base. The surface is coated with a greenish blue glaze. The slightly inward-turning mouth facilitates drinking while the sides curve gently toward the base.
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Wine cup with incised patterns
1100 – 1299
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.225
<p>This cup is similar in appearance to a round pot, with its mouth curving inwards slightly. The glaze has been oxidized, producing brown tints. The outer rim is black inlaid with a fret-patterned band, below which is also inlaid in black with chrysanthemum spray designs in three places. Coarse sand is stuck on the entire foot and outer base. Glaze has owed down to the interior of the cup during ring and has severely peeled off from the mouth and the outer surface in parts, exposing the body.<br />
[<em>Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art</em> (2014) p.123]<br />
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Small Cup
1200 – 1399
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.251

Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Ogre tile from the roof of the Great South Gate (Namdaemon) of Seoul
1391 – 1401
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.259
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