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Results for artist:"Korean"

334 UMMA Objects (page 1/28)
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This reddish brown earthenware jar has a globular body and long, widely flared neck. The below surface of the body is adorned with beaten parallel line.<br />
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This is a gray-brown, long-necked, high-fired stoneware jar with a round bottom. Its neck extends up in a straight line before flaring out suddenly near the rim, the edge of which is slightly concave. The body is globular and widest at its middle. Below this part of the vessel are decorations consisting of vertical paddled patterns that are parallel or superimposed. It is likely that the paddled pattern was also applied to the upper and middle parts of the vessel body, but was later erased during the rotation and water smoothing process. The inner surface of the body shows traces of rotation and water smoothing, along with fingerprint marks made in a vertical direction.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 46]<br />
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Round-bottomed storage jar with rolled, uneven rim
4th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.162
It has deep cylindrical bowl supported by a little flared pedestal foot. Five raised band lines encircle the middle of the bowl. A single handle is attached to the body of the bowl. The foot is separated into two parts and has a lot of rectangular holes located in altering position. There is no design on the surface of the bowl and foot.<br />
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This is a grayish white, high-fired stoneware pedestal bowl which is colored greenish-brown in places due to the formation of natural glaze. The bowl flares widely at its top and has a round base. Its outer surface is surrounded by five horizontal ridges which are arranged in three sets: two at the top, one in the middle and two at the bottom. The pedestal spreads outwards in a straight line and is divided into two sections by a set of two raised bands in its center. The upper and lower sections of the pedestal each contain five square perforations that are alternately offset from one another. The base edge of the pedestal is round and does not protrude much.
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Pedestal Cup or bowl with handle, on cut-out pedestal foot
467 – 532
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.180
The gray jar with a little long neck has a foot with rectangular perforations. The relatively thick mouth is slightly everted. Three deep incisions encircle the midsection of the neck. The globular body is decorated with two incised line encircled the body. There are wave designs on the neck and upper body. The foot whose bottom is rolled outward is a little high and wide.<br />
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This is a blue-gray, long-necked, high-fired stoneware jar. The long and flared neck of the jar is divided into four sections by thin horizontal incised lines in three places. The sections are decorated by the repeated use of short, downward strokes and wave designs made from scratching the surface with an implement. The body of the jar is widest at the middle, and slightly above the widest point, two incised lines have been drawn to form a section where the same wave design is applied from right to left according to the above technique. The lower part of the body shows faint traces of a parallel paddled pattern that has almo
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Large storage jar on cut-out pedestal foot
495 – 505
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.185
It has a flat base, globular body and straight neck. There was a bubbling of the clay surface during firing. The attached handle is a little small and thick.<br />
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This is a yellowish gray, low-fired earthenware cup with a handle. The mouth is upright, while the rest of the body has a swollen belly and a round base. The handle attached to the lower middle section of the body is not functional. Traces of rotation and water smoothing are visible on the inner and outer surfaces of the mouth.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 68]</p>
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Small Single-Handed Cup
500 – 549
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.190
It has a flat base, globular body and straight neck. There is no design on the surface of the body. The attached handle is a little small and thick.<br />
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This is a gray, high-fired stoneware cup with a handle. Its mouth is completely upright, and its rim has a sharp edge. The section immdiately below the mouth tapers inwards and is then connected to the round body. The body is widest at the center. The handle is attached to the lower-central part of the body; the upper end of the handle penetrates the side of the cup, while the lower end is joined by simply rubbing it against the cup&rsquo;s surface. There are traces of rotation and water smoothing on the inner and outer surfaces of the mouth. Natural glaze is visible in the parts around the round base.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 68]</p>
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Small Single-Handed Cup
500 – 549
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.191
It has a flat base, globular body and straight neck. Two narrow ridges encircle the body and a ridge encircles between the body and neck. The attached handle is a little small and get twisted.<br />
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This is a dark gray, low-fired stoneware cup with a handle. The almost-upright mouth gently inclines inwards, and the rim has a narrow, slightly rounded edge. Separated from the mouth by a horizontal ridge, the body is widest at its upper-central part. Two horizontal ridges encircle the body of the cup where the body is at its widest. The lower part of the body has been pared twice at different angles during rotation.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 70]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Large cup with globular body, cylindrical neck and twisted-vine handle
5th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.192
It is decorated with the seedpod of the lotus medallion. The pod contains seven seeds, one seed in the middle surrounded by six peripheral ones(1+6 seed pattern)<br />
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This high-fired convex eave-end roof tile with a lotus design has a dark gray surface and a gray core. It is made from clay mixed with numerous stone particles. The surface texture of the tile is extremely rough and its design crudely rendered.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 41]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Roof end tile with molded star-shaped lotus pattern
15th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.195
<p>This vessel was produced in a form typical of 13th century celadon bottles with the beautifully curved form and inlaid decorations on the entire surface. The body is divided into six segments, each of which is inlaid with chrysanthemum stems rst then stamped with owers using the inhwa (stamping) technique. Glaze was wiped away from the base and sand supports were used during ring. Glaze on the lower part of the bottle was poorly fused, yielding an opaque surface, however the overall quality of sintering is fine. The mouth has been repaired and restored. This piece is assumed to have been produced at a kiln at Yucheon-ri, Buan-gun, Jeollabuk-do.<br />
[<em>Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art</em> (2014) p.136]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Bottle with inlaid design of strands of chrysanthemum blossoms
1250 – 1299
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.246
<p>The long neck, curvilinear body, and ared mouth of this vessel create a typical Goryeo celadon bottle. A band of lotus petals inlaid with black and white slips is wrapped around the lower part of the neck, below which is a yeoui-head band inlaid with white slip. Three places around the belly of the bottle are decorated with lotus sprays inlaid with black and white slips. The glaze on the lower part of the body has been oxidized, where it is also extensively cracked. The foot is low, with a wide rim, and has sand spur marks.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.143]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Pear-shaped bottle with inlaid design of large lotus blossoms
1300 – 1499
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.249
<p>The beginning of the 14th century saw a change in inlaid patterns from using both black and white clay to only using white clay, as demonstrated by this bowl. Concentric white circles extend around the upper and lower parts of the inner and outer surfaces, while the inner wall features a chrysanthemum design in three places. Sand is stuck to the foot and the outer base. The bowl is tinged with vivid yellow. Parts of the rim are slightly damaged, but the glaze is finely fused.<br />
[<em>Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art </em>(2014) p.107]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Shallow bowl with inlaid chrysanthemum designs
14th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.250
Produced at regional kiln in the 17th and 8th centuries Joseon, this white porcelain bottle is stable and balanced in form. It was made from iron-rich clay which tinged the bottle with gray-white, a common characteristic of 17th century white porcelain. The glaze on the upper part is transparent and shiny, but that on the lower part was not fully melted, producing a rough texture. The foot exposes the clay body as the glaze was wiped away from the bottom of the foot.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.176]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Pear-Shaped Bottle
1600 – 1799
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.229
<p>This octagonal dish is inlaid with a chrysanthemum design with white and black slip on each facet. Its outer base is entirely glazed and has three quartzite spur marks. The inner surface is undecorated but covered in crackles, revealing the gray body. The glaze was oxidized during ring, leaving many areas brown.<br />
[<em>Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art </em>(2014) p.117]<br />
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Octagonal faceted bowl with inlaid design of paired chrysanthemums on outer side
1250 – 1350
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.234
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