370 UMMA Objects
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This woodblock contains Fascicle 24 of Essentials of the Comprehensive Mirror (通鑑節要, Tonggamjeolyo, Ch. Tongjian Jieyao), recording famous “Memorial for Northern Expeditions (出師表, Chulsapyo, Ch. Chushibiao) by Zhuge Liang (諸葛亮, 181-234) presented to his king, Liu Shan (劉禪, 207-271, r. 223-263), before his expedition to conquer Kingdom of Wei (魏, 220-265). Essentials of the Comprehensive Mirror is a compendium of Comprehensive Mirror in Aid of Governance (資治通鑑, Jachitonggam, Ch. Zizhi Tongjian), a chronological history compiled by Sima Guang (司馬光, 1019-1086) of Northern Song (960-1127), edited by Jiang Zhi (江 贄, 12th century) who lived during the reign of Huizong (徽宗, 1082-1135, r. 1100-1125). Jiang’s compendium abbreviated a massive volume of 294 fascicles into 50 fascicles. Both Comprehensive Mirror in Aid of Governance and Essentials of Comprehensive Mirror became known by the abbreviated title Comprehensive Mirror (通鑑, Tonggam, Ch. Tongjian). Essentials of Comprehensive Mirror was used as a cor
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Wood Block for Printing
1800 – 1832
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.315
This is an ordinatley jar shaped like maebyeong with a wide mouth. The shoulder is decorated with iron-pained semi-abstract vignette in two places. The decorated design is reddish brown in color, while its background color is pale gray-green. The foot and outer base are thoroughly glazed, on which are placed coarse sand during firing. The walls become thicker towards the base. The glaze was poorly applied. Therefore, the clay body is exposed in some places around the foot, and blisters reracuted ruptures resulted from bursting of the glaze.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.171]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Maebyeong (Wine Storage Bottle) with abstract floral spray design
1800 – 1850
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.302
Rice cake stamps are used to impress designs upon rice cakes. They are generally made of wood or ceramic. Ceramic rice cake stamps normally come in the form of round stamps and consist of a patterned surface and a handle. Patterns, carved or raised, on the stamp vary from geometric lines to auspicious designs that wish for prosperity and longevity. Their small size makes them highly portable, while their simple yet contemporary designs have mad them popular among collectors. The University of Michigan Museum of Art collection includes nine white porcelain rice cake stamps. Some are gifts from Mr. and Mrs. Hasenkamp, and others are gifts from Ok Ja Chang and the Chang family.<br />
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Glaze has been removed from the foot rim which rested on fine sand spurs during firing. The glaze is transparent with a strong blue tint.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.203]<br />
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Rice Cake Mold
19th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.299
A round peach-shaped water dropper. The peach itself is covered in a white glaze and covered in bamboo stalks and leaves. These are embossed onto the peach and stand out even more as the iron brown underglaze comes through strongest on these details. The iron brown underglaze can also be seen along the base of the waterdropper. The hole is at the top of the peach.<br />
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This is a peach-shaped water dropper shaped in a mold, featuring mold-impressed designs of peach leaf and branch on the surface. Its upper part is perforated by two water holes and the body is very light. Parts of the designs in high-relief are thinly glazed and tinged with brown. The foot is low. It was fired on the kiln shelf, which is an indication that it was produced in the early 20th century.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.185]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
White Porcelain Peach-Shaped Water Dropper
20th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.298
The upper surface of this vessel features a circle with the Chinese character &quot;je (祭: ancestral rite)&quot; rendered inside in cobalt blue pigment. The tray features blemishes, while the rims show traces of use. The foot retains traces of coarse sand supports stuck to it during firing. This type of ritual vessel has been excavated from the upper sediment layers of waste deposits of kilns in front of what is now Bunwon-ri Elementary School in Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do. Such vessels are presumed to have been produced immediately before the Bunwon-ri kiln cloised down and to have been widely supplied to the general public.&nbsp;<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.196]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Blue-and-white Ritual Dish with Inscription "Je (祭)"
19th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.283
This is a low pear wood storage chest, with three drawers and two doors. The butterfly and bat brass fittings for the hinges and drawer pulls add 'feminine' touches.
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Mouri jang (chest with 3 drawers and central double doors and butterfly brass fittings)
1833 – 1866
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.311
This white porcelain bottle is crudely shaped. It has a short neck and its surface is entirely covered in fine and evenly-spread crackles. Crackles are contaminated with many impurities, darkening the tone of the surface. Pale green transparent glaze was applied on the entire vessel including the foot which retains 12 refractory spur marks. The rim was slightly damaged before the application of glaze. The large number of pinholes on the lower part of the body and the sand stuck to the parts of the bottom suggest that this bottle was produced in a regional kiln.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.177]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Wine bottle with crackled glaze
19th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.276
<p>Brass is an alloy of copper and tin. Brassware objects generally include ritual bowls, tableware for aristocrats, incense burners, braziers, and spoons. The UMMA collection does not include a complete set of dining or ritual implements but individual items including four water bowls (<em>daejeop</em>), five rice bowls (<em>jubal</em>), seven kimchi bowls (<em>bosigi</em> ), six side-dish bowls (<em>jaengcheop</em>), one sauce dish (<em>jongji</em>), and four spoons. It is assumed that these items were produced during the modern era. All of them were formerly part of the Bruce Hasenkamp collection.</p>
The bowl of this spoon is round while the handle has straight sides, and its end has a semicircular cross section. This is a typical spoon from the late Joseon period.

<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017), 248]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Brass Serving Spoon (one of a pair)
1900 – 1950
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.306.2
These are <em>jubal</em>, a type of bowl used for serving steamed rice and often also called a <em>sabal</em>. The upper surfaces of the lids of these bowls are decorated with incised lines. Their bases are flat, without feet. The shapes of bowls follow regional characteristics. In northern provinces, rims curve inwards, and bowls are relatively short. In southern provinces, the walls stand almost straight, while bowls themselves are relatively tall.<br />
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<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 249]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Covered Brass Bowl with Protruding Sides
1900 – 1950
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.307A&B
Produced in an official court kiln of Joseon, this white porcelain bowl is relatively large in size. The presence of ashes and sand on its inner base indicates that it is a midium-grade object which was not fired inside a sagger. Fine sand of the kind found on high-grade white porcelain is stuck to its foot, but its rim is wider than those of highgrade objects. The state of its foot, its color, and form are similar to those of medium-grade white porcelain bowls produced at the Kiln no. 5 at Beoncheon-ri, Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.159]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Deep footed bowl with slightly everted rim
1525 – 1575
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.273
This reddish brown earthenware jar has a globular body and long, widely flared neck. The below surface of the body is adorned with beaten parallel line.<br />
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This is a gray-brown, long-necked, high-fired stoneware jar with a round bottom. Its neck extends up in a straight line before flaring out suddenly near the rim, the edge of which is slightly concave. The body is globular and widest at its middle. Below this part of the vessel are decorations consisting of vertical paddled patterns that are parallel or superimposed. It is likely that the paddled pattern was also applied to the upper and middle parts of the vessel body, but was later erased during the rotation and water smoothing process. The inner surface of the body shows traces of rotation and water smoothing, along with fingerprint marks made in a vertical direction.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 46]<br />
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Round-bottomed storage jar with rolled, uneven rim
5th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.162
It was common in the Gyeongju area, capital of the Silla Kingdom. The jar has a globular body, neck with straight sides and a little straight pedestal foot. Thick ridges encircle the mid upper part of the body and the lower and middle parts of the neck. The lower two sections of the neck are embellished with a delicate wave pattern. The low pedestal foot features eight square perforations at even intervals.<br />
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This is a gray, long-necked, high-fired stoneware jar with a pedestal. The neck is slightly splayed and the mouth curves inwards. Two horizontal ridges on the neck are formed by deeply incised horizontal lines. This method has been repeatedly used to form the other bands, one located on the center of the neck and the other where the neck and body meet. The section between these bands is decorated with a wave design formed by an eleven-tooth comb. The body is widest towards the upper-middle section, and a horizontal ridge, formed by two horizontal incised lines, is located slightly above this
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Storage jar on cut-out pedestal foot
5th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.184
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