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Results for additional_classification:"Decorative Arts"

273 UMMA Objects (page 1/23)
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Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Blue-and-white covered jar with landscape design
1890 – 1910
Gift of Professor Charles H. and Katharine C. Sawyer
2002/2.189A&B
This reddish brown earthenware jar has a globular body and long, widely flared neck. The below surface of the body is adorned with beaten parallel line.<br />
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This is a gray-brown, long-necked, high-fired stoneware jar with a round bottom. Its neck extends up in a straight line before flaring out suddenly near the rim, the edge of which is slightly concave. The body is globular and widest at its middle. Below this part of the vessel are decorations consisting of vertical paddled patterns that are parallel or superimposed. It is likely that the paddled pattern was also applied to the upper and middle parts of the vessel body, but was later erased during the rotation and water smoothing process. The inner surface of the body shows traces of rotation and water smoothing, along with fingerprint marks made in a vertical direction.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 46]<br />
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Round-bottomed storage jar with rolled, uneven rim
4th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.162
<p>This vessel conforms to a type of Goryeo celadon bottle that features a bulbous body, which has its center of gravisty at the lower part of the body, but its neck is rather stout when compared to the bottles produced in the 12th and 13th centuries. The shouler is decorated with a yeoui-head band, while chrysanthemum orets adorn the body in four places. The chrysanthemum designs were first stamped into the clay and inlaid with white slip; this stamping technique (inhwa) later developed into the style known as stamped buncheong ware. The base displays large cracks formed during ring. The glaze was unevenly fused, causing running and opaque melting in parts.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.145]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Buncheong ware small bottle with chrysanthemum and ruyi ('cloud collar') designs
1300 – 1499
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.260
Pear-shaped stoneware wine bottle with white slip and sgraffito designs. Stylized foliage is incised across the main register of the body, separated from the register above by two incised bands. Above this are perhaps incised stylized petals, and separating them from the flared lip of the bottle are two more incised bands. The incisions reveal the gray clay beneath the white slip.<br />
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This bottle is painted with thick white slip on its entire body and lotus petals decorate below the neck using a sgraffito technique. With a sharp tool, white slip is carved away from the belly to form scrolls. Traces of fine grains of sand remain on the rim of the foot, while the outer base also retains the marks of an implement that is pressed again the base. These are common characteristics shared with other pieces of 15th and 16th century buncheong wares. The glaze is well fused, producing a shiny surface, pale green and transparent.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Wine Bottle with Sgraffito Foliage Design
1400 – 1599
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.264
Produced in an official court kiln of Joseon, this white porcelain bowl is relatively large in size. The presence of ashes and sand on its inner base indicates that it is a midium-grade object which was not fired inside a sagger. Fine sand of the kind found on high-grade white porcelain is stuck to its foot, but its rim is wider than those of highgrade objects. The state of its foot, its color, and form are similar to those of medium-grade white porcelain bowls produced at the Kiln no. 5 at Beoncheon-ri, Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.159]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Deep footed bowl with slightly everted rim
1525 – 1575
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.273
<p>The long neck, curvilinear body, and ared mouth of this vessel create a typical Goryeo celadon bottle. A band of lotus petals inlaid with black and white slips is wrapped around the lower part of the neck, below which is a yeoui-head band inlaid with white slip. Three places around the belly of the bottle are decorated with lotus sprays inlaid with black and white slips. The glaze on the lower part of the body has been oxidized, where it is also extensively cracked. The foot is low, with a wide rim, and has sand spur marks.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.143]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Pear-shaped bottle with inlaid design of large lotus blossoms
1300 – 1499
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.249
Bottle with a long, narrow neck such as this one was generally used in private homes and restaurants to hold alcoholic drinks. Part of the body has come into direct contact with flames during firing, leaving the glaze scorched and volatilized. Glaze has also boiled and come off in parts of the shoulder. The foot is flat and wide, and clusters of soot have stuck to the lower part of the body. There are throwing marks on the neck and lower part of the body.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.212]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Bottle with slightly squat round body and narrow cylindrical neck
1900 – 1950
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.255
Black ceramic jar with a spout and a series of loops around the neck through which a cord could be threaded to secure a cover; decorated around the middle with a geometric pattern and striations.
Taiwanese
Oil Container
20th century
Gift of Ellen and Richard Laing
2006/2.39
Red lacquered wooden duck-shaped container wth lid
Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Container
20th century
Gift of Ellen and Richard Laing
2006/2.43A&B
Plaque in the form of a snarling lion's face holding a double-edged "severn star" (here only three of the seven stars are depicted as large dots connected by lines) sword in its mouth and ornamented with a red octagon containing the characters for "daqi" surrounded by eight trigrams on its forehead.
Taiwanese
Protective Amulet
20th century
Gift of Ellen and Richard Laing
2006/2.44

Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Blue-and-white shallow plate with the character shou (longevity), surrounded by 4 crabs
Gift of Ellen and Richard Laing
2006/2.53
Animal horn engraved with the Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom, in which a crowned lion and a chained unicorn supporting a shield stand above a banner with the motto “dieu et mon droit” (which directly translated from French means “God and my right” referring to the monarch’s divine right to govern which has been used as the motto of the British monarch since it was adopted by Henry V (1413-1422)).  The shield consists of four quadrants: the first quadrant contains four lions, the second contains three fleurs de lis, the third contains a mermaid and a harp, the fourth contains three lions and a stag or dog-like animal.  Surrounding the shield is a belt or garter upon which is emblazoned “Honi soit qui mal y pense” which means “evil unto they who think evil,” the motto of the Order of the Knights of the Garter, an ancient exclusive British order consisting of 25 members who were selected by the king of England. Near the base, the horn is engraved with a cityscape of Philadelphia from the harbor with nu
Artist Unknown
Engraved Powder Horn
18th century
Museum purchase made possible by the W. Hawkins Ferry Fund
2007/1.101
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