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73 UMMA Objects (page 1/7)
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Standing figure with its hands clasped at a u-shaped protrusion on its chest. The facial features include an angular nose, slit mouth, and eyes made of glass beads.
Fipa
Standing Male Figure
1950 – 1999
Gift of Mary Paul and Bruce Stubbs in honor of Evan Maurer
2016/1.206
Standing figure with one hand at its hip and the other at its chest. The facial features include an angular nose, slit mouth, and eyes made of glass beads. 
Fipa
Standing Male Figure
1950 – 1999
Gift of Mary Paul and Bruce Stubbs in honor of Evan Maurer
2016/1.207
Carved wooden figure of a human. The umbilicus protrudes and is concave, which would have held magical/medicinal substances. The figure is posed with crossed legs and one hand supporting the head. The face is detailed, with glass eyes. A metal ring was placed around the neck of the figure. The top of the head is empty, but possibly contained magical substances as well. 
Vili (Kongo) (Vili)
Power Figure
1845 – 1855
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.183
This wooden&nbsp;figure depicts a female with a strikingly large, balloon-shaped animal skin sack tied above the crown of her head. An animal horn has been embedded within this massive sack. Representative of the northern style of Kusu carvings which is known to have sharp, angular forms, this&nbsp;<em>kakudji</em>&nbsp;features an ovoid head; a rounded, convex face and forehead; large ears; prominent cheekbones; coffeebean-shaped eyes within large ocular cavities; a well-defined, pointed nose; an elliptical mouth with slightly parted lips; a long, cylindrical neck; arms bent at the elbow, forming a 90-degree angle at the waist; and breasts that are situated nearly at shoulder level. The figure possesses a swollen belly, indicating pregnancy, and hence, representing the themes of maternity, fertility, and the continuation of the lineage. Animal skin enshrouds the female&rsquo;s lower body. Tukula powder, derived from the camwood tree and used to consecrate&nbsp;<em>kakudji</em>, appears on the figure&rsquo;s
Kusu (Kusu (Luba region style))
Power Figure
1915 – 1925
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.223
This male figure has a powerful body, with a smooth, bare chest that stands with knees flexed and arms bent next to the sides of the abdomen. The elaborate coiffure is styled as a braid forming concentric circles at the back of the head. The figure exhibits many of the facial traits characteristic of the Chokwe expansionistic style including half-closed eyes set in large, concave ocular cavities; small nose; arched ears; large, rectilinear mouth with fleshy lips; and a prominent disk-shaped chin. The figure dons pants depicting shredded fiber worn by masked dancers. It has large feet that lack toes; the fingers are also not shaped. Notably, the figure has several cavities: one on the top of the head, one in the middle of the abdomen, and another between its legs. These openings held medicinal ingredients which were either placed on their own or contained in a horn. The figure&#39;s body features honey coloration and a black coating, characteristics frequently seen in figures of the neighboring Lwena people.
Hamba (ancestor) figure
1915 – 1925
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.206
This woodcarved, cephalomorphic divination pestle is representative of the Luba Shankadi style of figural sculpture, which is characterized by an abstract and schematic form. The head features a convex face, diamond-shaped eyes carved in relief, a ridged forehead and nose, an oblong mouth, and a long, cylindrical neck. The figure’s terraced, cascading coiffure is typical of hairstyles found in the Shankadi region. Four strands of china beads, white and blue in color, have been tied around the pestle and sit atop its circular base.
Luba (Luba (culture or style))
Pestle
1875 – 1885
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.221
Wooden stool with a circular base and four human figures supporting the upper portion. The figures have horizontal grooves decorating their wrists and ankles. The edge of the upper portion of the stool is decorated with incised diamond shapes. 
Stool
1901 – 1999
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.240
This anthropomorphic <em>nkisi</em>, or power figure, stands upright and features a rather large, forward-tilting head with a prominent, parted mouth, high cheekbones with shallow cheeks, and chipped glass-encrusted lower eyes. A brass tack pierces the figure’s forehead, directly above its nose.  The figure possesses a rectangular torso and robust appendages, although the lower arms and feet are missing. The figure likely held a medicine pack upon its abdomen, evidenced by the four holes bored into its torso, and another one upon its cranium. Around the figure’s neck is a collar, possibly of leather, another place in which medicines are carried.
Vili (Kongo) (Vili)
Power Figure
1845 – 1855
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.179
This double-faced sculpture has been carved from semihard wood. The male is distinguished by the beard, formed by a double row of small triangles. The female, which faces the opposite direction, shares a neck and trunk with her male counterpart. The heads are disproportionately large and both faces are ovoid-shaped, with a wide convex forehead and broad features. Their coiffures converge to form a single cone composed by stratified, semi-circular rings. A cavity on the top of the coiffure likely held medicinal substances, imbuing the figure with power. The male and female each have sharply protruding bellies, marked with round umbilici.  Both possess two sets of arms, which are detached from the body and situated on either side of their respective abdomens. Three of the four feet have broken off. The encrusted surface of the <em>kabeja</em> reveals that it was once the recipient of libational offerings.   
Hemba (Hemba (culture or style))
Power Figure
1865 – 1875
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.226
A poised, naturalistic male figure sits on a stool, holding an egg in his right hand, his left hand resting on his left knee. The head is round, almost egg-shaped with a high, sloping forehead rising from pronounced eyebrows. The eyes are almond-shaped, the nose long and slender, the mouth a small straignt line. The neck is long and ringed. The surface of the figure is smooth, carefully finished, golden brown in color, though worn or mottled in places. 
Osei Bonsu;Asante (Asante)
Display figure
1945 – 1955
Gift of Margaret H. and Albert J. Coudron
2001/2.33
Small bowl supported by two fish on a circular base. The two fish are curved so that the head, tail, and one fin support the bowl while the middle of the body rests on the base. The other fin connects the fish&#39;s tail to the head. The edge of the bowl and the base are decorated with incised diagonal marks.&nbsp;
Yoruba (Yoruba (culture or style))
Bowl
1901 – 1999
Gift and partial purchase from the estate of Kurt Delbanco in honor of Nicholas Delbanco
2017/1.669
This woodcarved figure depicts a female with a large bowl-shaped vessel upon the crown of her head, intended to be a container for symbolic, medicinal and spirit “activating” ingredients. Representative of the Kasongo style (regarded as the “classical” or “pure” Kusu stylistic form), this <em>kakudji</em> features an inverted, triangular-shaped head, a wide, convex forehead, high ears, cowrie shell eyes, a triangular nose, an oval mouth with protruding lips, a pointed chin, and conical breasts. The figure possesses a prominent belly indicating pregnancy, and representing the themes of maternity, fertility, and the continuation of the lineage. A large piece of textured cloth tied in place with rope encircles the female’s lower arms and lower body.
Kusu (Kusu (Luba region style))
Power Figure
1925 – 1935
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.222
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