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Results for terms:inlay (process)

17 UMMA Objects (page 1/2)
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Inlaying silver into ironware was a popular method of decorating metalwork that required high levels of skill. Numerous items were produced with inlay decorations. The entire lid and body of this hexagonal case are decorated with inlaid silver. The lid features a hexagonal design in its center surrounded by a continuous four-leaf flower design. The six sides of the body are decorated by three pairs of turtle designs, crane designs and deer designs, arranged alternately. The lid and body are bordered with a fret-patterned band. This case with a flat base is excellently preserved. This type of iron-lidded case with inlaid silver design was produced in large quantities from the nineteenth century to the early twentieth century, continuing through the Japanese annexation of the Korean Peninsula. Such cases are mostly octagonal; this is a rare hexagonal example.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017), 244]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Hexagonal Tobacco Box with Lid
19th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.280A&B
egg-shaped wood vessel on legs, with petal-shaped opening on top
Alby Hall
Egg-shaped vessel
1992
Gift of Robert M. and Lillian Montalto Bohlen
2002/2.142
<p>The long neck, curvilinear body, and ared mouth of this vessel create a typical Goryeo celadon bottle. A band of lotus petals inlaid with black and white slips is wrapped around the lower part of the neck, below which is a yeoui-head band inlaid with white slip. Three places around the belly of the bottle are decorated with lotus sprays inlaid with black and white slips. The glaze on the lower part of the body has been oxidized, where it is also extensively cracked. The foot is low, with a wide rim, and has sand spur marks.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.143]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Pear-shaped bottle with inlaid design of large lotus blossoms
1300 – 1499
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.249
<p>The lid of this jar is carved with lotus petal design, crowned with the knob shaped as a lotus bud. Three refractory spurs are stuck to the inside of the lid. The shoulder of the jar is decorated with a descending willow design inlaid with white slip. The entire foot and outer base are glazed, but it is poorly fused and rough with impurities stuck to it. The lid retains a celadon color, but the jar itself is a light gray hue overall.<br />
[<em>Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art </em>(2014) p.134]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Covered Cosmetic Jar
1167 – 1232
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.243A&B
It has a wide mouth and a shape which flared out to a generously-sized shoulder, then tapers to a slim lower body. It is a storage jar inlaid chrysanthemum, cloud and crane design.<br />
<br />
This is an ornate short-necked jar embellished with inlaid designs of clouds and cranes on its entire body. It is built by coiling due to its large size. Its shoulder and lower part of the body are inlaid with lotus petals, and the body is inlaid with cranes and chrysanthemums. Lumps of glaze are found on some parts of the body and pinpoles are found around the foot. Crazing was formed on the entire glazed surface. Shards of similar vessels had been excavated from Yucheon-ri, Buan- gun, Jeollabuk-do.<br />
[<em>Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art</em> (2014) p. 135]<br />
&nbsp;
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Storage jar with inlaid floral designs
1250 – 1350
Gift of Mrs. Henry Jewett Greene for The Mr. and Mrs. Henry Jewett Greene Memorial Collection
1972/2.33
<p>This bowl was produced between the late 12th and 13th century, when ornate decoration was accorded greater importance than the beauty of color. A small circle was incised at the inner bottom, surrounded by two concentric circles inlaid with white slip. On the inner wall are decorated four small medallions inside which are rendered chrysanthemum sprays. On both the upper part of the inner and outer walls are decorated a band of scrolls and a pair of horizontal lines, respectively. The low foot displays refractory spur marks. Glaze drips and cracks are visible in parts of the bowl&rsquo;s surface.<br />
[<em>Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art</em> (2014) p.104]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Shallow bowl with inlaid chrysanthemum roundels, black and white slip
1150 – 1199
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.241
<p>This bowl dates from the 14th century when the beauty of the decoration was highly valued more than basic color. It is covered with inlaid designs on both the inner and outer walls. On its inerior rim are inlaid foliage scrolls in white, while the inner wall is decorated with black-and-white inlaid cranes in four places against the background filled with inlaid clouds. At the center of its inner base is also inlaid a chrysanthemum enclircled by a double line, which is then bordered with a row of yeoui-head design. The glaze on the outer surface is poorly fused, and has been entirely repaired.<br />
[<em>Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (</em>2014) p.122)<br />
&nbsp;</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Wine cup with inlaid design of cranes flying among clouds
14th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.247
<p>The beginning of the 14th century saw a change in inlaid patterns from using both black and white clay to only using white clay, as demonstrated by this bowl. Concentric white circles extend around the upper and lower parts of the inner and outer surfaces, while the inner wall features a chrysanthemum design in three places. Sand is stuck to the foot and the outer base. The bowl is tinged with vivid yellow. Parts of the rim are slightly damaged, but the glaze is finely fused.<br />
[<em>Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art </em>(2014) p.107]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Shallow bowl with inlaid chrysanthemum designs
14th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.250
It is in the shape of a sectioned melon. The body is vertically divided into ten sections and to create an embossed effect, the grooves between each two sections were pressed down slightly. The lid has a loop attached at the top. It is decorated on all sides with black and white inlaid design of butterfly, chrysanthemum and peony with stem and foliage. The spout and handle was broken and restored. The lid seems to be fake.
<p>This is a ribbed ewer in the shape of a melon. It is decorated with black-and-white inlaid designs of peonies, chrysanthemums, and butterflies on the body, and yeoui-head designs around the mouth. Also on the lower part of the body are inlaid scrolls with white slip. Its outer base is glazed thoroughly, and it was supported with quartzite spurs in six places. The handle in the shape of a bamboo stem is currently broken off, while the spout and stopper have been repaired in places. The overall state of the vessel&rsquo;s glaze and decorative designs, however, allow it to be categorized a
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Ewer in the shape of a melon with inlaid floral and butterfly designs
1100 – 1150
Gift of Mrs. Caroline I. Plumer for the James Marshall Plumer Collection
1973/2.33
<p>This is a celadon lidded bowl with the top of the lid decorated with a peony spray design inside a hexafoil outline inlaid with black and white slips. The foot was made by removing clay from the underside of the base and retains traces of quartzite spurs in three places. The glaze was slightly darkened on the upper part with faint gloss. The glaze is poorly fused on the base of the body, leaving practically no sheen. The piece is of high value, however, for the glimpse it offers of Goryeo&rsquo;s refined yet splendid inlaid celadon ware, thanks to its decorative design that depicts a peony in full bloom, inlaid with white clay.<br />
[<em>Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art </em>(2014) p.118]<br />
&nbsp;</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Cosmetic Box with inlaid peony (?) design: 6-lobed shape to lip top
1167 – 1199
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.240A&B
<p>This octagonal dish is inlaid with a chrysanthemum design with white and black slip on each facet. Its outer base is entirely glazed and has three quartzite spur marks. The inner surface is undecorated but covered in crackles, revealing the gray body. The glaze was oxidized during ring, leaving many areas brown.<br />
[<em>Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art </em>(2014) p.117]<br />
&nbsp;</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Octagonal faceted bowl with inlaid design of paired chrysanthemums on outer side
1250 – 1350
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.234
<p>This dish with a lobed rim was shaped with a mold. Inlaid on each lobed wall and at the center of its inner base with white slip are chrysanthemum spray design and a chrysanthemum floret, respectively. On the flat outer base remain three quartzite spur marks. The entire dish was glazed including the outer base; the state of sintering is good, while the glaze is pure and green. Crackles are spread throughout the inner and outer surfaces.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.116]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Ten-lobed lotus saucer with inlaid floral patterns
13th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.232
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