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Results for terms:genre (visual works)

94 UMMA Objects (page 1/8)
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Malian
Ceramic Jewelry Molds (One of eighteen)
1900 – 1932
Gift of Prof. and Mrs. Horace M. Miner
1983/2.214
A pottery inkwell of dark blue color has a rectangluar shape body. There are two lid covering the inkwell and there are two pen holder.
Artist Unknown
Art pottery inkwell, "ATC," blue mottled, pen holder
1875 – 1975
Gift in loving memory of Donald Maxwell Robiner from his family
2010/1.305
A bronze colored porcelain urn. Includes images on each side.
Japanese (Japanese (culture or style))
Satsuma Urn
1867 – 1899
Gift of Mary Beth and Holger Petersen
2011/1.76

Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Lamp Stand in the shape of a teapot with floral designs
1700 – 1899
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1986/2.103
Arabic calligraphic script on paper; script is in Maghribi style, written in black ink with touches of green and rec ochre. Shadows of script (from reverse or opposite page, transferred while closed?) show through. Beige paper is browned with age at edges; upper left has repaired tear.
Qur’an manuscript leaf in Maghribi script
13th century
Museum Purchase
1959/1.146
A tall glazed and speckled porcelain offering dish for an altar. The base is a narrow and sharply tapered cylinder which meets an angular bottom of a dish. The dish itself is wide and shallow.<br />
<br />
This vessel built from low quality clay and is coated with a blue-green-tinted glaze, giving it a pale green-brown tone overall. Coarse sand is stuck to the foot rim. The tray is contaminated by many impurities and iron spots. The vessel was produced at a regional kiln.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.199]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Altar Dish
1850 – 1899
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.45
A glazed porcelain offering dish for an altar. The base is a narrow tapered cylinder with a ridged pattern on it. On top of it is a wide and shallow dish.<br />
<br />
This white porcelain ritual vessel is a product of a regional kiln. The foot has a hendecagonal cross-section, while the tray is wide in relation to the foot. The iron-rich clay tinged the vessel with green-brown, while the large amounts of sand contained in the clay formed a rough texture. The foot retains traces of sand supports in eight places. Glaze on the reverse side of the vessel has crawled in parts, revealing the clay body and producing many flaws.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.199]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Altar Dish
1850 – 1899
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.46
A short glazed and speckled gray porcelain offering dish for an altar. The base is a small, tapered cylinder which then becomes the base of a slighlt deep dish. The gray glaze has some green coloration throughout the piece.<br />
<br />
The glaze has vivid blue-green tints, lending it the appearance of celadon. The foot has coarse sand spur marks on the entire surface. This is a low-quality dish with its tray contaminated by many flecks of ash, and it is a product of a regional kiln.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.198]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Altar Dish
1850 – 1899
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.40
A short glazed and speckled gray porcelain offering dish for an altar. The base is a wide, slightly tapered cylinder which at the top is attached to a shallow dish. At the bottom of the base as well as a circle on the top of the dish there is some discoloration and morphing of the ceramic.<br />
<br />
This dish is gray in color and has large amounts of ash and pinholes on the surface. It is a low-grade object, with sand spur makrs remaining on the inner base due to fired among a stack of other vessels. Coarse sand is stuck to the foot.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.198]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Altar Dish
1850 – 1899
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.44
A glazed porcelain offering dish for an altar. The base is a wide cylinder which tapers sharply into a narrow top. The base supports a wide, almost flat disk as the bowl.<br />
<br />
The dish is made from iron-rich clay that tinged the bowl with green-brown. The foot retains traces of sand spurs in eight places. Glaze on the reverse side of the vessel has crawled in parts, revealing the clay body and producing many flaws. This vessel was produced at a regional kiln.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.200]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Altar Dish
1850 – 1899
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.48
A glazed and speckled porcelain offering dish for an altar. The base is a wide decorated cylinder which tapers sharply into a narrow top. The base supports a wide, shallow bowl.<br />
<br />
This ritual dish was produced at a regional kiln. It is a low-quality object with a rough texture, made from the clay mixed with sand, contaminated with many impurities on the tray. Its glaze is dark with blue-green tints, giving the vessel the appearance of celadon. Its foot has an octagonal cross-section.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.200]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Altar Dish
1850 – 1899
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.47

Malian
Ceramic Jewelry Molds (One of eighteen)
1900 – 1932
Gift of Prof. and Mrs. Horace M. Miner
1983/2.216
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