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Results for terms:Three Kingdoms (Korean)

40 UMMA Objects (page 1/4)
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This grayish-blue stoneware jar has a globular body and short, a little flared neck. The surface of the body is encircled with a lot of thin incised lines. The base is a little flat.<br />
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This is a dark gray, short-necked, high-fired stoneware jar with a flat bottom. The edge of the rim is round, and the inner surface of the neck is slightly tapered below the rim. The body is at its widest in the central part, while the flat base is rounded where it meets the body and is slightly indented at the edges. The entire body shows traces of rotation and water smoothing, with uneven surfaces resulting from rough water smoothing particularly visible on the lower part. The base also shows traces of having been pared and rubbed.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 50]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Storage Jar with wide mouth and everted rim
6th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.173
It has a flat base, globular body and straight neck. There was a bubbling of the clay surface during firing. The attached handle is a little small and thick.<br />
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This is a yellowish gray, low-fired earthenware cup with a handle. The mouth is upright, while the rest of the body has a swollen belly and a round base. The handle attached to the lower middle section of the body is not functional. Traces of rotation and water smoothing are visible on the inner and outer surfaces of the mouth.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 68]</p>
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Small Single-Handed Cup
500 – 549
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.190
It is a urinal earthware. There is a everted mouth on the round body. It is unglazed.<br />
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This is a gray, turtle-shaped, low-fired earthenware bottle. The neck is attached to one end of the body, rising outwards before flaring out once again. Its rim is round. The inner surface of the neck and the lower part of the body show signs of rotation and water smoothing. The bottom of the bottle is rounded.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 77]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Tiger pot (urinal)
668 – 935
Gift of Estelle Titiev, from the collection of Mischa Titiev
1984/2.8
The cover has a button-shaped knob at the top and is mostly plain. The mounted bowl has a outward-turned rim. This type of mounted bowl may be deated to sometime in the early 5th century.<br />
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This is a blue-gray, high-fired stoneware lidded stem cup. The shape of the lid is similar to that of the Korean letter &lsquo;ㅏ&rsquo; and is crowned with a ring-shaped knob. The cup&rsquo;s flange slopes inwards and has a sharp edge, while the gallery that supports the lid protrudes slightly. The trumpet-shaped pedestal is perforated in four places by rectangular openings and has a slightly thick bottom edge.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 61]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Covered bowl on cut-out pedestal foot
400 – 599
Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Millard H. Pryor
1969/1.98A&B
It has a little Flaring base with spherical food storage bowl on top. There are no holes in the base. The lid is attached with a knob-handle shaped like a button. There is no design on the lid but stained some part.<br />
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This is a dark gray, high-fired stoneware lidded stem cup. The stem cup features a shallow bowl, a low pedestal, and a separate lid with a ring-shaped knob. The shape of the lid resembles the Korean vowel &ldquo;ㅏ.&rdquo; The flange of the cup slopes inwards and has a round edge, while the gallery supporting the lid protrudes slightly upwards. The pedestal is surrounded by several raised bands, and its bottom edge is rounded. The outer surface shows traces of the potter&rsquo;s wheel and natural glaze in parts.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 64]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Covered Pedestal Bowl
600 – 799
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.203A&B
A tall ceramic bowl with an inward-sloping lip, making the opening smaller than the width of the bowl. Has an accompanying matching lid.<br />
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This yellow, low-fired earthenware vessel consists of a body and a lid. It is made from fine clay mixed with a small amount of fine sand particles. Fine, incised horizontal lines run around the body. The gallery that supports the lid rests at a slight incline, and the vessel mouth slopes slightly inwards. The lower part of the body rapidly tapers inwards before joining the base, the center of which is indented. The lid features a low, flat knob. The round, upper part of the lid meets the lip at a slight angle.[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 45]<br />
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Bowl
400 – 599
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.75A
It has a outward-turned rim. The side of the body is becoming narrow in the base. The bottem is flat.<br />
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This yellowish brown, bowl-shaped, low-fired earthenware vessel is made from fine clay mixed with fine sand particles. It has no neck. The mouth is slightly everted while the rim is generally flat and features some grooves. The body is widest towards the upper-middle section, and the flat base is rounded where it joins the body. Parts of the vessel feature a paddled pattern which suggests that the surface was first paddled and then smoothed with water on a rotary device.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 44]<br />
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Bowl with flat bottom and flat rolled rim
298 – 299
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.160
This vessel consists of a cup with an outward-flaring mouth supported on an inverted V-shaped pedestal foot. A single oval-shaped handle is attached to the underside of the cup. The pedestal foot is decorated with four vertical rectangular perforations. Immediately below this is a pair of thin horizontal ridges, which also encircle the body of the cup.<br />
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This is a gray, high-fired stoneware stem cup. It is characterized by its shallow cup body and trumpet-shaped flared pedestal. A raised-band encircles the lower part of the pedestal, which is perforated by rectangular apertures in four places. A loop-shaped handle is attached to the lower part of the cup.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 66]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Cup with handle on cut-out pedestal
400 – 599
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.181
It has a flat base, globular body and straight neck. There is no design on the surface of the body. The attached handle is a little small and thick.<br />
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This is a gray, high-fired stoneware cup with a handle. Its mouth is completely upright, and its rim has a sharp edge. The section immdiately below the mouth tapers inwards and is then connected to the round body. The body is widest at the center. The handle is attached to the lower-central part of the body; the upper end of the handle penetrates the side of the cup, while the lower end is joined by simply rubbing it against the cup&rsquo;s surface. There are traces of rotation and water smoothing on the inner and outer surfaces of the mouth. Natural glaze is visible in the parts around the round base.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 68]</p>
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Small Single-Handed Cup
500 – 549
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.191
It has a outward-turned rim. The side of the body is almost straight. The bottem is flat. There is a comb pattern on the body surface.<br />
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This is a reddish yellow, deep-bowl-shaped, low-fired earthenware vessel. Such vessels were generally used for boiling but this example contains no trace of use and is therefore likely to have come from a tomb. The vessel does not have a neck, the mouth is everted, and the flat edge of the rim features a groove. The vessel body is widest towards the upper-middle section, and the flat base is rounded where it joins the vessel body. The inner and outer surfaces of the vessel body show clear traces of paddling, but it is unclear whether these are cord-paddled markings. The base retains traces of the potter&rsquo;s wheel.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p.45]<br />
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Deep bowl with flat bottom and everted, flat rolled rim
298 – 299
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.161
This grayish-blue stoneware jar has a globular body and short, flared neck. The entire surface of the body is adorned with wave pattern and encircled with many thin incised lines. The base is flat.<br />
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This is a dark gray, long-necked, high-fired stoneware jar with a wide mouth. Its neck is widely flared, while an olive brown natural glaze has formed on the inner surface of the neck and on the shoulder. Shallow incised horizontal lines encircle the outer surface of the neck. The neck shows traces of rotation and water smoothing. The body is widest at its upper-middle part, and a series of incised horizontal lines surrounds the body in three places in its upper part. The areas in between these lines are decorated with wave designs created by combs with many teeth. The vessel originally featured a paddled pattern consisting of diagonally parallel lines along the upper-middle part of the body, and a diagonal crosshatch paddled pattern right below. However, these designs were erased by subsequent rotat
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Cord-marked round-bottomed jar with wide, flared mouth
400 – 532
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.166
This cup consists of two parts such as the long cup and the midsection containing balls. It has a wide mouth together with a large and flat bottom. Two protruding bands divide the sup into four fields, with the bottom three being decorated with incised gouged dots patterns. The midsection has two areas divided by a protruding band. Both areas have some triangular perforations<br />
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This is a grayish brown, low-fired earthenware bell cup. The bell section is in the shape of two cups attached together at the rim; one cup is upright, while the other cup is reversed. This bell is attached to the base of the cup. The body of the cup is divided into four segments by three sets of raised bands; the lower three segments feature vertical lines of dots. The body of the bell is divided into upper and lower sections, each of which contains a series of triangular perforations offset from those of the other segment. Vertical lines of dots, the same as those on the body, were applied between the perforations in the
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Bell Cup (goblet with rattle base)
5th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.170
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