Advanced Search

K-12 Educator
K-12 Student
Museum Visitor
UMMA Docent
UMMA Staff
University Faculty
University Student
Between and Mortarboard


UMMA Object Specific Fields






Query builder

Scholar in a Thatched Hut

Accession Number
2006/1.118

Title
Scholar in a Thatched Hut

Artist(s)
Feng Chaoran (Feng Chao-an)

Object Creation Date
1909

Medium & Support
ink and color on paper

Dimensions
52 in x 12 5/8 in (132 cm x 32 cm);68 7/8 in x 20 11/16 in (175 cm x 52.5 cm)

Credit Line
Gift of Dr. Cheng-Yang and Mrs. Shirley Chang

Label copy
Each of these hanging scrolls depicts a scholar in a landscape with a descriptive inscription—a practice that harkens back to the Song dynasty (960–1279). Though Feng lived in the modern period, he seems to have embraced the poetic and reclusive ideals of the Song dynasty represented by his subjects. He lived on Songshan (“Song mountain”) Road in Shanghai, and named his house “Thatch Dwelling on Songshan” as a way of connecting himself to Song-dynasty luminaries. He depicts the Song poet Lin Bu (967–1028) (second from right) in a thatched hut, which suggests his status as an eccentric recluse. Feng’s admiration for Song scholars is also apparent in Master Su Tongbo in a Straw Hat and Sandals (third from right), a portrayal of the renowned Su Shi (1037–1101), a maverick poet-official. Feng’s painting style, however, is modeled on that of the Jiang Su school: a group of artists that originated in the Ming dynasty (1368–1644). In the colophons, he identifies Hua Yan (1682–1765), Luo Pin (1733–1799), and Chen Chun (1483–1544) as models.
 
The idea that an artist should pay homage to past masters was central to the literati (amateur scholar-artist) tradition in which Feng was trained, as is his calligraphy-based brushwork. His light-colored palette, however, represents his own, modern take on this tradition. Feng was an important mentor to his nephew, the artist Chang Ku-nien (1906–1987), whose work is also in the Museum’s collection.

Fall rotation 2016

Subject matter
This hanging scroll depicts a scholar in a landscape with a descriptive inscription—a practice that harkens back to the Song dynasty (960–1279). Though Feng lived in the modern period, he seems to have embraced the poetic and reclusive ideals of the Song dynasty represented by his subjects. He lived on Songshan (“Song mountain”) Road in Shanghai, and named his house “Thatch Dwelling on Songshan” as a way of connecting himself to Song-dynasty luminaries. Here he depicts the Song poet Lin Bu (967–1028) in a thatched hut, which suggests his status as an eccentric recluse. 
The idea that an artist should pay homage to past masters was central to the literati (amateur scholar-artist) tradition in which Feng was trained, as is his calligraphy-based brushwork. His light-colored palette, however, represents his own, modern take on this tradition. Feng was an important mentor to his nephew, the artist Chang Ku-nien (1906–1987), whose work is also in the Museum’s collection.

Physical Description
A scholar sits under a thatched hut in the mountains. He strokes his long beard as a kettle warms. The colophon indicated that the scholar the the famous Song dynasty recluse Lin Bu. In his thatch hut in the Solitary Mountain, he is composing a poem in light smoke from the faint fireplace.

Primary Object Classification
Painting

Rights
If you are interested in using an image for a publication, please visit http://umma.umich.edu/request-image for more information and to fill out the online Image Rights and Reproductions Request Form. Keywords
huts (houses)
ink
scholars

5 Related Resources

Home
(Part of 6 Learning Collections)
Ink and Realisms
(Part of: Artist Associations and Art Movements)
Literacy, Reading, and Writing
(Part of 10 Learning Collections)
Docent Materials for Art in the Age of the Internet    
(Part of: Docent Information From Training Continuing Education Sessions)

& Author Notes

All Rights Reserved