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Kimono

Accession Number
2005/1.377

Title
Kimono

Artist(s)
Japanese

Artist Nationality
Japanese (culture or style)

Object Creation Date
1970s - early 1990s

Medium & Support
black silk crepe with painted, gilt and embroidered designs

Dimensions
61 13/16 in x 53 1/8 in (157 cm x 135 cm);19 5/16 in (49 cm)

Credit Line
Gift of Howard and Patricia Yamaguchi

Label copy
Kimono
Japan, Showa period (1926–1989)
1970s–early 1990s
Black silk crepe with painted, gilt and embroidered designs
Gift of Howard and Patricia Yamaguchi, 2005/1.377

Starkly elegant black tomesode are the most formal kimono, worn only by married women on festive occasions. This kimono has five family crests—two on the front, and three on the back—and abstract designs of pine trees, golden clouds, and a flowing river discretely incorporated on the hem. The materials and techniques suit the kimono’s intended formality: the wavy lines are hand painted in the yûzen dyeing technique, which allows for a vivid rendering of motifs using rice flour paste to resist the dye; the cloud was created by applying gold leaf to the fabric, a traditional technique called surihaku; and the pine trees are embroidered with silver threads. This complex layering of various techniques is characteristic of Japanese luxury textiles.

; Label copy
Starkly elegant black tomesode are the most formal kimono, worn only by married women on festive occasions. This kimono has five family crests—two on the front, and three on the back—and abstract designs of pine trees, golden clouds, and a flowing river discretely incorporated on the hem. The materials and techniques suit the kimono’s intended formality: the wavy lines are hand painted in the yûzen dyeing technique, which allows for a vivid rendering of motifs using rice flour paste to resist the dye; the cloud was created by applying gold leaf to the fabric, a traditional technique called surihaku; and the pine trees are embroidered with silver threads. This complex layering of various techniques is characteristic of Japanese luxury textiles.

Subject matter
This is a tomosode kimono, the most formal format, as indicated by the five crests. The reserve technique for the crest is also the most formal (versus embroidery, for example). A tomosode kimono would be worn by a married woman to the wedding of a close relative.
The technique used to create the design on this kimono is yuzen, developed in 17th century Japan. Yuzen require much skill and hard work, by first protecting the design area with a rice-paste resist and dying the rest of the cloth. Afterwards, the resist is removed and the design and details are hand-painted.

Physical Description
Black silk crepe with yuzen (paste-resist hand-painted), surihaku (silt) and embroidered designs. Five crests done in reserve (appears as white on black). Lining is plain-weave white satin for the entire length of the kimono. Collar, upper torso, and sleeves have a double lining.

Primary Object Classification
Costume and Costume Accessories

Primary Object Type
kimono

Additional Object Classification(s)
Textile

Collection Area
Asian

Rights
If you are interested in using an image for a publication, please visit http://umma.umich.edu/request-image for more information and to fill out the online Image Rights and Reproductions Request Form. Keywords
embroidery (visual works)
floral patterns
kimonos

1 Related Resource

Marriage
(Part of 8 Learning Collections)

& Author Notes

All Rights Reserved

On display