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Results for medium:"porcelain"

336 UMMA Objects (page 1/28)
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E. F. Chapman
Phrenological Head
19th century
Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Irving F. Burton
1973/2.42
Produced in an official court kiln of Joseon, this white porcelain bowl is relatively large in size. The presence of ashes and sand on its inner base indicates that it is a midium-grade object which was not fired inside a sagger. Fine sand of the kind found on high-grade white porcelain is stuck to its foot, but its rim is wider than those of highgrade objects. The state of its foot, its color, and form are similar to those of medium-grade white porcelain bowls produced at the Kiln no. 5 at Beoncheon-ri, Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.159]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Deep footed bowl with slightly everted rim
1525 – 1575
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.273
Rice cake stamps are used to impress designs upon rice cakes. They are generally made of wood or ceramic. Ceramic rice cake stamps normally come in the form of round stamps and consist of a patterned surface and a handle. Patterns, carved or raised, on the stamp vary from geometric lines to auspicious designs that wish for prosperity and longevity. Their small size makes them highly portable, while their simple yet contemporary designs have mad them popular among collectors. The University of Michigan Museum of Art collection includes nine white porcelain rice cake stamps. Some are gifts from Mr. and Mrs. Hasenkamp, and others are gifts from Ok Ja Chang and the Chang family.<br />
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Glaze has been removed from the foot rim which rested on fine sand spurs during firing. The glaze is transparent with a strong blue tint.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.203]<br />
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Rice Cake Mold
19th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.299
A porcelain inkwell of a woman sitting. She is holding a green vase in both hands and is wearing a blue pointy hat. The rest of her outfit is orange.
Artist Unknown
Seated Woman Inkwell, iridescent porcelain with blue peaked lid vase, figure
1875 – 1975
Gift in loving memory of Donald Maxwell Robiner from his family
2010/1.276
Thick walled terracotta planter with purple glazing.
Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Beaker-shaped Vase
1948
Gift of the Estate of Hobart Taylor, Jr.
1982/1.210

Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Snuff bottle adorned with symbols of longevity
1796 – 1850
Gift of Mr. Robert W. Coggan
1980/2.104
A glazed porcelain jar, whose body is wide and round with a lipped, wide opening. Detailed with a Korean character, possibly a label for the jar&#39;s contents, in blue.<br />
<br />
Both sides of the shoulder are decorated with letters that resemble Japanese hiragana syllables. The vessel appears to have been produced under the influence of Japanese technology and capital. The entire vessel is glazed except the foot rim. The high kaolin content of the clay has produced a light jar with thin walls.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.208]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Porcelain Jar
1900 – 1950
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.66
A glazed porcelain jar, whose body is wide and round with a lipped, wide opening. Detailed with a Korean character, possibly a label for the jar&#39;s contents, in blue.<br />
<br />
This is a type of white porcelain was produced under the influence of Japanese technology and capital. Its shoulder is decorated in two places with letters that resemble Japanese <em>hiragana</em> syllables. The entire vessel, except the foot rim, is glazed. The high kaolin content of the clay has produced a light jar with thin walls.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.208]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Porcelain Jar
1900 – 1950
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.69
A porcelain inkwell with floral decorations.  The base is white but the flowers are in various colors, including red, blue, and pink.
Artist Unknown
Porcelain floral inksander and bottle
1875 – 1975
Gift in loving memory of Donald Maxwell Robiner from his family
2010/1.265
White handled vessel with lid and blue flower motifs and small town scene.
German
Small Tyrolese Pottery Jar
Estate of Professor Arthur Lyon Cross
1940.405A&B
Rice cake stamps are used to impress designs upon rice cakes. They are generally made of wood or ceramic. Ceramic rice cake stamps normally come in the form of round stamps and consist of a patterned surface and a handle. Patterns, carved or raised, on the stamp vary from geometric lines to auspicious designs that wish for prosperity and longevity. Their small size makes them highly portable, while their simple yet contemporary designs have mad them popular among collectors. The University of Michigan Museum of Art collection includes nine white porcelain rice cake stamps. Some are gifts from Mr. and Mrs. Hasenkamp, and others are gifts from Ok Ja Chang and the Chang family.<br />
<br />
This rice cake stamp features a geometric line design in relief. There are sand spur marks on the foot. The handle is perforated to allow the attachment of string for hanging up the mold.&nbsp;<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.202]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Rice Cake Mold
19th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.290
A glazed porcelain jar, whose body is wide and round with a lipped, wide opening. Detailed with a Korean character, possibly a label for the jar&#39;s contents, in blue.<br />
<br />
This voluminous jar is decorated with simplified foliage designs on the body in underglaze cobalt blue in two places. Glaze has been wiped away from the rim and the foot rim. The body features a crack and several black spots. It is made from the kaolinite-rich clay which formed thin and light walls.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.175]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Porcelain Jar
1900 – 1950
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.67
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