384 UMMA Objects
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This thin porcelain conical bowl has a direct slightly everted rim on a footring. Its interior has a lightly incised floral meander decoration,and it is covered in a white glaze with bluish tinge.
Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Bowl
1000 – 1132
Gift of Mrs. Caroline I. Plumer for the James Marshall Plumer Collection
1973/2.14
A small, thin, porcelain bowl with an everted, foliate rim, on a foot ring.  It is painted in an underglaze blue decoration of birds and flowers, separated into eight panels on both the interior and exterior, and covered in a clear glaze. 
Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Bowl
1573 – 1619
Museum purchase made possible by the Augusta Plumer Weiss Memorial Fund
1977/2.19
A medium size, well potted jar with round shoulder and shorter neck. Inside is not totally glazed. On the body, pine, bamboo, and plum trees are finely painted with blue underglaze. Then a translucent glaze is applied, which turns into milky, white color. It has three floral decorations on the shoulder; the decoration is originated in functional elements of “ears” to which ropes were tied for transportation. The neck has a band of double lines and spray design of peony flowers and leaves. The rim of the neck is unglazed. The foot is unglazed; eye is glazed. Some imperfections of glaze are seen toward the bottom. Glaze is scraped off on one part. Many speckles on the surface.
Japanese (Japanese (culture or style))
Blue-and-white jar with floral and leaf design
1615 – 1643
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1964/1.99
A thin conical porcelain bowl with a direct rim on a footring and an interior with incised cloud-like decoration. It is covered in a white glaze with bluish tinge.
Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Bowl
960 – 1279
Museum purchase for the James Marshall Plumer Memorial Collection
1964/2.74
Deep porcelain bowl with wide foot, fine body, and colorless glaze.<br />
<br />
This high-quality white porcelain bowl is presumed to have been produced at official court kilns around Usan-ri, Gwangju-si, Gyeonggido. The well-levigated clay of finest quality was used for this bowl. Sagger was used to protect the bowl during firing to attain its pure white, immaculate surface. Entire foot of the bowl was glazed, and the foot was placed upon a fine white sand support to make the surface as clean as possible. The outer base is enscribed with Chinese character &ldquo;天&quot; (&ldquo;Cheon;&rdquo; sky, heaven)&rdquo; by scraping off the glaze. The characters &ldquo;大&rdquo; (&ldquo;Dae;&rdquo; big; great)&rdquo; and &ldquo;黃&rdquo; (&ldquo;Hwang;&rdquo; yellow) have been stippled after firing. Finely fused and sintered, this bowl exemplifies the essence of white porcelain made from offical court kilns, which is robust and white as a white jade.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (20
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Deep Bowl
15th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.265
Many white porcelain bottles of this type were produced at Bunwon-ri in the 19th century. One side of its body is decorated with a spray of plum blossom, with the stem and flowers rendered in underglaze iron brown and cobalt blue, respectively. The relatively vivid colors of iron and cobalt colors made the decorations highly effective. The entire foot was glazed, while the foot rim retains traces of fine sand spurs. The precipitation of ash deposits on one side has produced pale green spots. However, this is a high-grade object with transparent and well-fused glaze.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.180]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Wine bottle with plum branch design
1850 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.275
This is a grayish brown small jar with a short neck and a globular body. It is dated to the end of the 19th century, judging from its motifs, color of cobalt-blue and shape. It is decorated with a line around the rim and with floral scrolls on the shoulder. The entire foot is glazed and has grains of coarse sand stuck to it. Extensive contamination from impurities on its surface has given it a yellow tint overall.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.174]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Small Blue-and-White Jar with Bamboo Design, misfired
19th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.277
Porcelain wine bottle with ten cobalt pigment depicting Chinese Daoist ten symbols of longevity&mdash;sun, cloud, mountain, rock, water, crane, deer, turtle, pine tree, and the mushroom of eternal youth. A blue band rings the foot of the bottle, as well as just below the main register of the body. The ten symbols of longevity design stretches around the bulbous body above, tapering off as the body begins to taper into the tubular neck, culminating in a slightly flared rim.<br />
<br />
This bottle was produced in Bunwon-ri, Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do. It is decorated on the entire surface with ten longevity symbols, including deer, pine trees, and cranes, rendered in underglaze cobalt blue. Ten longevity symbols were frequently chosen to decorate the stationery, bottles, and jars produced in the late 19th century at kilns in Bunwon-ri. This is a high-quality white porcelain bottle, with well sintered clay and glaze and outstanding cobalt blue colouring.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Wine bottle with Ten Symbols of Longevity design
19th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.281
A round water dropper in the shape of a curled fish. There are two holes, one located in the middle, near the tail fin, and the other near the head on the dorsal fin. The fish is a white and cobalt blue color.<br />
<br />
This is a carp-shaped water dropper produced within the vicinity of Bunwon-ri, Gwangju-si, and Yeoju-si area in Gyeonggi-do in the late 19th century. Its upper surface features a realistic carp design in relief and entirely colored with cobalt blue. Such animal-shaped vessels are simple in form, but they were esteemed by many for their auspicious meaning. The base is flat, wide, and stained by ink.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.184]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Blue-and-White Water Dropper in the Shape of a Fish
1867 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.286
Covered ceramic jar with brilliantly colored Thai-inspired overglaze enamel painting in floral patterns.  The lid mimics the spires of Thai Buddhist architecture, rising from the gentle curve of the lower portion of the lid and alternating between solid bands of green, and multicolored floral patterns.  The green covers what would be the underside of each of the colorful three tiers of "roof" segments, culminating in what appears to be a red and gold lotus bud at the top of the lid.
Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Bencharong Ware Jar (tho)
19th century
Gift of Doris Duke's Southeast Asian Art Collection
2005/1.465A&B
A tall glazed and speckled white-blue porcelain offering dish for an altar. The base is a wide, slightly tapered cylinder. The dish a the top is quite wide and shallow until it reaches the point of the base, where there is a deep hole in the cylinder of the base.<br />
<br />
This is a hard-paste cup stand with a glossy surface. It is a high-grade object and was produced at a kiln in Bunwonri, Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do. There are fine cracks in one side of its foot.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.201]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Altar Dish
1850 – 1899
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.43
A glazed and speckled porcelain offering dish for an altar. The base is a wide decorated cylinder which tapers sharply into a narrow top. The base supports a wide, shallow bowl.<br />
<br />
This ritual dish was produced at a regional kiln. It is a low-quality object with a rough texture, made from the clay mixed with sand, contaminated with many impurities on the tray. Its glaze is dark with blue-green tints, giving the vessel the appearance of celadon. Its foot has an octagonal cross-section.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.200]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Altar Dish
1850 – 1899
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.47
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