61 UMMA Objects
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A thin conical porcelain bowl with a direct rim on a footring and an interior with incised cloud-like decoration. It is covered in a white glaze with bluish tinge.
Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Bowl
960 – 1279
Museum purchase for the James Marshall Plumer Memorial Collection
1964/2.74
A glazed and speckled porcelain offering dish for an altar. The base is a wide decorated cylinder which tapers sharply into a narrow top. The base supports a wide, shallow bowl.<br />
<br />
This ritual dish was produced at a regional kiln. It is a low-quality object with a rough texture, made from the clay mixed with sand, contaminated with many impurities on the tray. Its glaze is dark with blue-green tints, giving the vessel the appearance of celadon. Its foot has an octagonal cross-section.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.200]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Altar Dish
1850 – 1899
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.47
A tall glazed and speckled white-blue porcelain offering dish for an altar. The base is a wide, slightly tapered cylinder. The dish a the top is quite wide and shallow until it reaches the point of the base, where there is a deep hole in the cylinder of the base.<br />
<br />
This is a hard-paste cup stand with a glossy surface. It is a high-grade object and was produced at a kiln in Bunwonri, Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do. There are fine cracks in one side of its foot.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.201]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Altar Dish
1850 – 1899
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.43
A small glazed porcelain piece resembling a cake stand. The base of the mold is wide, round and vertical rather than tapered. The top is detailed with a carved pattern that would imprint the rice cake being molded on it.<br />
<br />
Rice cake stamps are used to impress designs upon rice cakes. They are generally made of wood or ceramic. Ceramic rice cake stamps normally come in the form of round stamps and consist of a patterned surface and a handle. Patterns, carved or raised, on the stamp vary from geometric lines to auspicious designs that wish for prosperity and longevity. Their small size makes them highly portable, while their simple yet contemporary designs have mad them popular among collectors. The University of Michigan Museum of Art collection includes nine white porcelain rice cake stamps. Some are gifts from Mr. and Mrs. Hasenkamp, and others are gifts from Ok Ja Chang and the Chang family.<br />
<br />
This rice cake stamp features a geometric line design. Its walls are thick and heavy. The
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Rice Cake Mold
1850 – 1899
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.84
Burial wares are those placed in tombs as a way of praying for the continued happiness and comfort of the deceased in the afterlife. Offering vessels produced in the Joseon period included smaller reproductions of the vessels used every day, such as jars, boxes, and bowls, among others. The University of Michigan Museum of Art houses a set of white porcelain offering vessels buried in pit graves between the late 16th century and early 17th century. The vessels are coated in pale blue glaze but generally tinged with gray. They were fired without using saggers, while resting on fine sand supports. Their glaze is relatively well applied and fused. The cintamani-shaped knobs on the lids are similar to those found on the lids of vessels produced at white porcelain kilns near Seondong-ri and Songjeong-ri in Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do in the 17th century.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.191]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Burial Set (15 plates, 16 bowls and 6 lids)
17th century
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.79.37
Burial wares are those placed in tombs as a way of praying for the continued happiness and comfort of the deceased in the afterlife. Offering vessels produced in the Joseon period included smaller reproductions of the vessels used every day, such as jars, boxes, and bowls, among others. The University of Michigan Museum of Art houses a set of white porcelain offering vessels buried in pit graves between the late 16th century and early 17th century. The vessels are coated in pale blue glaze but generally tinged with gray. They were fired without using saggers, while resting on fine sand supports. Their glaze is relatively well applied and fused. The cintamani-shaped knobs on the lids are similar to those found on the lids of vessels produced at white porcelain kilns near Seondong-ri and Songjeong-ri in Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do in the 17th century.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.193]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Burial Set (15 plates, 16 bowls and 6 lids)
17th century
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.79.31
Burial wares are those placed in tombs as a way of praying for the continued happiness and comfort of the deceased in the afterlife. Offering vessels produced in the Joseon period included smaller reproductions of the vessels used every day, such as jars, boxes, and bowls, among others. The University of Michigan Museum of Art houses a set of white porcelain offering vessels buried in pit graves between the late 16th century and early 17th century. The vessels are coated in pale blue glaze but generally tinged with gray. They were fired without using saggers, while resting on fine sand supports. Their glaze is relatively well applied and fused. The cintamani-shaped knobs on the lids are similar to those found on the lids of vessels produced at white porcelain kilns near Seondong-ri and Songjeong-ri in Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do in the 17th century.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.188]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Burial Set (15 plates, 16 bowls and 6 lids)
17th century
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.79.7
Burial wares are those placed in tombs as a way of praying for the continued happiness and comfort of the deceased in the afterlife. Offering vessels produced in the Joseon period included smaller reproductions of the vessels used every day, such as jars, boxes, and bowls, among others. The University of Michigan Museum of Art houses a set of white porcelain offering vessels buried in pit graves between the late 16th century and early 17th century. The vessels are coated in pale blue glaze but generally tinged with gray. They were fired without using saggers, while resting on fine sand supports. Their glaze is relatively well applied and fused. The cintamani-shaped knobs on the lids are similar to those found on the lids of vessels produced at white porcelain kilns near Seondong-ri and Songjeong-ri in Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do in the 17th century.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.187]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Burial Set (15 plates, 16 bowls and 6 lids)
17th century
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.79.12
Burial wares are those placed in tombs as a way of praying for the continued happiness and comfort of the deceased in the afterlife. Offering vessels produced in the Joseon period included smaller reproductions of the vessels used every day, such as jars, boxes, and bowls, among others. The University of Michigan Museum of Art houses a set of white porcelain offering vessels buried in pit graves between the late 16th century and early 17th century. The vessels are coated in pale blue glaze but generally tinged with gray. They were fired without using saggers, while resting on fine sand supports. Their glaze is relatively well applied and fused. The cintamani-shaped knobs on the lids are similar to those found on the lids of vessels produced at white porcelain kilns near Seondong-ri and Songjeong-ri in Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do in the 17th century.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.188]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Burial Set (15 plates, 16 bowls and 6 lids)
17th century
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.79.11
Burial wares are those placed in tombs as a way of praying for the continued happiness and comfort of the deceased in the afterlife. Offering vessels produced in the Joseon period included smaller reproductions of the vessels used every day, such as jars, boxes, and bowls, among others. The University of Michigan Museum of Art houses a set of white porcelain offering vessels buried in pit graves between the late 16th century and early 17th century. The vessels are coated in pale blue glaze but generally tinged with gray. They were fired without using saggers, while resting on fine sand supports. Their glaze is relatively well applied and fused. The cintamani-shaped knobs on the lids are similar to those found on the lids of vessels produced at white porcelain kilns near Seondong-ri and Songjeong-ri in Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do in the 17th century.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.188]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Burial Set (15 plates, 16 bowls and 6 lids)
17th century
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.79.9
Burial wares are those placed in tombs as a way of praying for the continued happiness and comfort of the deceased in the afterlife. Offering vessels produced in the Joseon period included smaller reproductions of the vessels used every day, such as jars, boxes, and bowls, among others. The University of Michigan Museum of Art houses a set of white porcelain offering vessels buried in pit graves between the late 16th century and early 17th century. The vessels are coated in pale blue glaze but generally tinged with gray. They were fired without using saggers, while resting on fine sand supports. Their glaze is relatively well applied and fused. The cintamani-shaped knobs on the lids are similar to those found on the lids of vessels produced at white porcelain kilns near Seondong-ri and Songjeong-ri in Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do in the 17th century.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.192]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Burial Set (15 plates, 16 bowls and 6 lids)
17th century
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.79.28
Burial wares are those placed in tombs as a way of praying for the continued happiness and comfort of the deceased in the afterlife. Offering vessels produced in the Joseon period included smaller reproductions of the vessels used every day, such as jars, boxes, and bowls, among others. The University of Michigan Museum of Art houses a set of white porcelain offering vessels buried in pit graves between the late 16th century and early 17th century. The vessels are coated in pale blue glaze but generally tinged with gray. They were fired without using saggers, while resting on fine sand supports. Their glaze is relatively well applied and fused. The cintamani-shaped knobs on the lids are similar to those found on the lids of vessels produced at white porcelain kilns near Seondong-ri and Songjeong-ri in Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do in the 17th century.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.189]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Burial Set (15 plates, 16 bowls and 6 lids)
17th century
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.79.15
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