444 UMMA Objects
Sort by

A brass ring that is not fully closed off.  The ring completes a half circle and the two ends are flattened.
African (African (general, continental cultures))
Brass Ring
20th century
Gift of Denise Miner Stanford
2010/2.15
<p>Brass is an alloy of copper and tin. Brassware objects generally include ritual bowls, tableware for aristocrats, incense burners, braziers, and spoons. The UMMA collection does not include a complete set of dining or ritual implements but individual items including four water bowls (<em>daejeop</em>), five rice bowls (<em>jubal</em>), seven kimchi bowls (<em>bosigi</em> ), six side-dish bowls (<em>jaengcheop</em>), one sauce dish (<em>jongji</em>), and four spoons. It is assumed that these items were produced during the modern era. All of them were formerly part of the Bruce Hasenkamp collection.</p>
The bowl of this spoon is round while the handle has straight sides, and its end has a semicircular cross section. This is a typical spoon from the late Joseon period.

<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017), 248]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Brass Serving Spoon (one of a pair)
1900 – 1950
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.306.2
These are <em>jubal</em>, a type of bowl used for serving steamed rice and often also called a <em>sabal</em>. The upper surfaces of the lids of these bowls are decorated with incised lines. Their bases are flat, without feet. The shapes of bowls follow regional characteristics. In northern provinces, rims curve inwards, and bowls are relatively short. In southern provinces, the walls stand almost straight, while bowls themselves are relatively tall.<br />
&nbsp;
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 249]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Covered Brass Bowl with Protruding Sides
1900 – 1950
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.307A&B

Indian (Indian (South Asian))
Betel Nut Cutter with "fish roe" designs
1850 – 1950
Gift of the Estate of Samuel Eilenberg
2001/2.148

Indian (Indian (South Asian))
Betel Nut Cutter
1850 – 1950
Gift of the Estate of Samuel Eilenberg
2001/2.155
A brass cylinder shape canister for matches with double stamped images around the body of the canister. There is a small lid covering one end of the canister.
African (African (general, continental cultures))
Canister for Matches (with lid)
1900 – 1985
Gift of Doran H. Ross
2010/1.172A&B
A brass madallion with the image of a lion stamped into the metal in raised relief surrounded by abstract, rope-like patterns.
African (African (general, continental cultures))
Medallion with Lion Head
1900 – 1985
Gift of Doran H. Ross
2010/1.178
This small goldweight cast in brass is designed in an abstract pattern. The weight is rounded with a pattern of lines crossing the piece vertically and horizontally to break the surface into a series of squares, with small round balls cut in two placed at the intersections of the horizontal and vertical lines.
African (African (general, continental cultures))
Goldweight
1900 – 1985
Gift of Doran H. Ross
2010/1.179
Goldweights are small objects cast from brass used to weigh out quantities of gold and gold dust.  They are cast using a lost-wax casting technique, wherein wax is sculpted into the desired shape and a mold is pressed around the wax model.  Then, the mold is heated and the wax drained out, leaving a void in the shape of the original wax model.  Liquid brass is poured into the mold and allowed to set before the caster cracks the mold open and retrieves the finished goldweight.
African (African (general, continental cultures))
Goldweight
1900 – 1985
Gift of Doran H. Ross
2010/1.181
Goldweights are small objects cast from brass used to weigh out quantities of gold and gold dust.  They are cast using a lost-wax casting technique, wherein wax is sculpted into the desired shape and a mold is pressed around the wax model.  Then, the mold is heated and the wax drained out, leaving a void in the shape of the original wax model.  Liquid brass is poured into the mold and allowed to set before the caster cracks the mold open and retrieves the finished goldweight.
African (African (general, continental cultures))
Goldweight
1900 – 1985
Gift of Doran H. Ross
2010/1.182
Goldweights are small objects cast from brass used to weigh out quantities of gold and gold dust.  They are cast using a lost-wax casting technique, wherein wax is sculpted into the desired shape and a mold is pressed around the wax model.  Then, the mold is heated and the wax drained out, leaving a void in the shape of the original wax model.  Liquid brass is poured into the mold and allowed to set before the caster cracks the mold open and retrieves the finished goldweight.
African (African (general, continental cultures))
Goldweight
1900 – 1985
Gift of Doran H. Ross
2010/1.184
Goldweights are small objects cast from brass used to weigh out quantities of gold and gold dust.  They are cast using a lost-wax casting technique, wherein wax is sculpted into the desired shape and a mold is pressed around the wax model.  Then, the mold is heated and the wax drained out, leaving a void in the shape of the original wax model.  Liquid brass is poured into the mold and allowed to set before the caster cracks the mold open and retrieves the finished goldweight.
African (African (general, continental cultures))
Goldweight
1900 – 1985
Gift of Doran H. Ross
2010/1.187
xxxx
Loading…