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UMMA Object Specific Fields






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Results for medium:"brass"

443 UMMA Objects (page 1/37)
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Iranian (Iranian)
Pin with Horned animal
Gift of the Estate of Maxine W. Kunstadter in memory of Sigmund Kunstadter, Class of 1922
1983/1.431

Anklet with six figures
1945 – 1955
Museum Purchase made possible by the Friends of the Museum of Art
1985/1.193
Gold-weight in the shape of a cylindrical rod set between two circular discs, attached to a pointed blade set between two triangular protrusions. 
Akan (Akan (culture or style))
Gold-weight
1900 – 1985
Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Milford Golden
1986/2.132
Gold-weight in the shape of a triangular block with trefoil-lobed ends and grooved sides. 
Akan (Akan (culture or style))
Gold-weight
1900 – 1985
Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Milford Golden
1986/2.135
Gold-weight in the shape of a three dimensional triangle with two tiered sides and two smooth sides, with triangle-shaped notches along opposing edges. 
Akan (Akan (culture or style))
Gold-weight
1895 – 1905
Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Milford Golden
1986/2.140
<p>Brass is an alloy of copper and tin. Brassware objects generally include ritual bowls, tableware for aristocrats, incense burners, braziers, and spoons. The UMMA collection does not include a complete set of dining or ritual implements but individual items including four water bowls (<em>daejeop</em>), five rice bowls (<em>jubal</em>), seven kimchi bowls (<em>bosigi</em> ), six side-dish bowls (<em>jaengcheop</em>), one sauce dish (<em>jongji</em>), and four spoons. It is assumed that these items were produced during the modern era. All of them were formerly part of the Bruce Hasenkamp collection.</p>
The bowl of this spoon is round while the handle has straight sides, and its end has a semicircular cross section. This is a typical spoon from the late Joseon period.

<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017), 248]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Brass Serving Spoon (one of a pair)
1600 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.306.2
These are <em>jubal</em>, a type of bowl used for serving steamed rice and often also called a <em>sabal</em>. The upper surfaces of the lids of these bowls are decorated with incised lines. Their bases are flat, without feet. The shapes of bowls follow regional characteristics. In northern provinces, rims curve inwards, and bowls are relatively short. In southern provinces, the walls stand almost straight, while bowls themselves are relatively tall.<br />
&nbsp;
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 249]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Covered Brass Bowl with Protruding Sides
1600 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.307A&B

Indian (Indian (South Asian))
Betel Nut Cutter with "fish roe" designs
1850 – 1950
Gift of the Estate of Samuel Eilenberg
2001/2.148

Indian (Indian (South Asian))
Betel Nut Cutter
1850 – 1950
Gift of the Estate of Samuel Eilenberg
2001/2.155
Gold-weight in the shape of a square base with two crossed lines, each with a set of two smaller parallel lines branching outward. 
Akan (Akan (culture or style))
Gold-weight
1900 – 1985
Gift of Dr. James and Vivian Curtis
1997/1.384
Gold-weight in the shape of a curved line, wider at one end, with raised sections along the shaft. The narrow end is topped with a cap with a rounded point. The wider end has three round protrusions with horizontal incisions. 
Akan (Akan (culture or style))
Gold-weight
20th century
Gift of Dr. James and Vivian Curtis
1997/1.460
Gold-weight in the shape of a narrow rod with a rounded top, attached to a triangular piece inserted in a cylinder. 
Akan (Akan (culture or style))
Gold-weight
20th century
Gift of Dr. James and Vivian Curtis
1997/1.461
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