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Results for date_created:"1633"

515 UMMA Objects (page 1/43)
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Seated male figure with an elongated face that tilts backwards. A columnar projection, possibly a beard, extends from the bottom of the chin to the figure's knees. Both of the figure's hands grip the beard-like projection. 
Sierra Leonean (Sierra Leonean)
Male Figure
1400 – 1699
Gift of Leah and John Atwater
2016/1.240
Crouching or seated female figure with an elongated face that tilts backwards. The figure is holding her breasts and has a distended stomach and deep navel. 
Sierra Leonean (Sierra Leonean)
Female Figure
1400 – 1699
Gift of Leah and John Atwater
2016/1.241

Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Kang table
17th century
Gift of Marybelle B. Hanna
2001/1.346

Japanese (Japanese (culture or style))
Kesa (monk's surplice) Fragment
17th century
Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Stephen H. Spurr
2003/2.21
This type of bowl, with an inverted rim and hollow inside, is known as an <em>okbari</em> or <em>omok-bansanggi</em> (concave tableware). Considering its size, it was probably used for serving steamed rice. The tall foot was made separately before being attached. One line is incised around the outer rim of the bowl, which gently slopes inwards. The nipple-shaped handle is fixed to the top of the lid by a nail. The head of a nail joining the foot to the base of the bowl is visible on the indented base of the foot.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017), 249]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Covered Bowl
1600 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.304A&B
This rice bowl, or <em>jubal</em>, has a flat base. Normally, such rice bowls are classified into three different sizes: large, medium-sized and small. Their shapes are almost identical.<br />
&nbsp;
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 250]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Bowl
1600 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.305
<p>Brass is an alloy of copper and tin. Brassware objects generally include ritual bowls, tableware for aristocrats, incense burners, braziers, and spoons. The UMMA collection does not include a complete set of dining or ritual implements but individual items including four water bowls (<em>daejeop</em>), five rice bowls (<em>jubal</em>), seven kimchi bowls (<em>bosigi</em> ), six side-dish bowls (<em>jaengcheop</em>), one sauce dish (<em>jongji</em>), and four spoons. It is assumed that these items were produced during the modern era. All of them were formerly part of the Bruce Hasenkamp collection.</p>
The bowl of this spoon is round while the handle has straight sides, and its end has a semicircular cross section. This is a typical spoon from the late Joseon period.

<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017), 248]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Brass Serving Spoon (one of a pair)
1600 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.306.2
A woman wearing long robes sits holding a pen in her right hand and props up a blank tablet in her lap. A putto helps support the table from behind and points toward the seated figure. A pot of ink with another pen appears next to his foot.
Bartolomeo Coriolano (Italian (culture or style))
Sibyl Seated with Tablet
17th century
Gift of J. Frederick Hoffman
2009/2.23

Thai
Head of a Buddha
1600 – 1799
Gift of Doris Duke's Southeast Asian Art Collection
2005/1.452
This small sketch presents a view along a waterway that passes beneath a double-arched bridge. The triangular sail of a small boat is visible just before the bridge, moored to the quai next to some sheds. A tall church with a central steeple rises on the right bank in the foreground, and two other tall buildings punctuate the middle ground and distance. The chimneys and rooflines of humbler dwellings appear on the left bank. Despite the urban setting, only a few figures may be glimpsed, including a man crossing the bridge on horseback.
Jan Josephsz van Goyen
View of a River Town with a Bridge
17th century
Gift from the Joseph F. McCrindle Collection
2008/2.199.5
These ink sketches, on a portion of a larger sheet, depict different female heads, most ornamented with accessories. A study of a woman’s face in profile fills the upper left corner. Her hair is bound. A nearly frontal view of another woman’s face is at the center bottom of the sheet. She looks down to her left and wears a jeweled headpiece or crown. Three other smaller and more lightly sketched heads also appear on the sheet, two along the left edge and one on the right.
Stefano della Bella (Italian (culture or style))
Untitled (Studies of Female Heads)
1630 – 1664
Joseph F. McCrindle Collection
2009/1.491
This ink sketch on paper contains a woman in the upper center hunched over with a bundle on her back. The lower half contains two female figures with an obscured female profile in between. On the left is a half-length figure of a woman seen from the back wearing a dress. In the center is the head of a woman in profile wearing a headscarf. On the right is a woman, drawn to her hemline, standing in three-quarters profile facing right, wearing a heavy robe.<br />
The reverse has a sketch of a young male turning to face slightly backward with left arm upraised.
Stefano della Bella (Italian (culture or style))
Untitled (Sketch of a Woman Carrying a Bundle and Female Figures)
1630 – 1664
Joseph F. McCrindle Collection
2009/1.492
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