323 UMMA Objects
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Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Herdboy and Buffalo in the Moonlight
1200 – 1399
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1961/2.12
&quot;On&nbsp;the&nbsp;right&nbsp;side&nbsp;is&nbsp;a&nbsp;drawing&nbsp;of&nbsp;a&nbsp;straw&nbsp;broom&nbsp;accompanied&nbsp;by&nbsp;a&nbsp;single&nbsp;line&nbsp;of&nbsp;verse that reads,<br />
Ippatsu ichiboku&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;One&nbsp;stroke, one&nbsp;line&nbsp;<br />
Soha&nbsp;zokujin&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; Sweeps&nbsp;away worldly&nbsp;dust.<br />
In&nbsp;a&nbsp;Zen&nbsp;fashion&nbsp;the&nbsp;poem&nbsp;suggests&nbsp;that&nbsp;one&nbsp;line&nbsp;of&nbsp;ink&nbsp;will clear&nbsp;away&nbsp;the&nbsp;confusion&nbsp;of&nbsp;everyday&nbsp;life. The&nbsp;sweeping action&nbsp;is&nbsp;materialized&nbsp;by&nbsp;the&nbsp;sketch&nbsp;of&nbsp;the&nbsp;broom.<br />
The&nbsp;next&nbsp;poem&nbsp;plays&nbsp;upon&nbsp;the&nbsp;sweeping&nbsp;action mentioned&nbsp;above,<br />
Yukuharu&nbsp;no &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; Departing&nbsp;Spring&#39;s<br />
Shiripeta&nbsp;harau&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;Buttocks&nbsp;are&nbsp;brushed
Yosa Buson (Japanese (culture or style))
Broom, Poems, and Poets
18th century
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1969/2.24
A medium size, well potted jar with round shoulder and shorter neck. Inside is not totally glazed. On the body, pine, bamboo, and plum trees are finely painted with blue underglaze. Then a translucent glaze is applied, which turns into milky, white color. It has three floral decorations on the shoulder; the decoration is originated in functional elements of “ears” to which ropes were tied for transportation. The neck has a band of double lines and spray design of peony flowers and leaves. The rim of the neck is unglazed. The foot is unglazed; eye is glazed. Some imperfections of glaze are seen toward the bottom. Glaze is scraped off on one part. Many speckles on the surface.
Japanese (Japanese (culture or style))
Blue-and-white jar with floral and leaf design
1615 – 1643
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1964/1.99

Torii Kiyonobu
Beauty
1925 – 1935
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1986/1.160

Mori Tetsuzan (Tessan)
A Pair of Camels
1800 – 1849
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1986/1.164
There are two cherry branches point downward. They&nbsp;start at the top and end in the middle of the painting. Twigs jut out from the branches and hold leaves with a reddish tint. There is a signature and seal in the bottom right of the painting.
Nishiyama Kan'ei
Cherry Branches
1850 – 1899
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1990/1.192
There are three ducks in the water. The first is facing forward and is sitting in the water with its feet completely submerged. The second is behind the first but is a little higher in the water and is pecking at its feathers. The third is the furthest behind and is standing in the water with its legs fully visible but its feet submerged, it is also pecking at its feathers. There are two signatures and two seals on the right side of the painting.
Nishiyama Kan'ei
Ducks
1884
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1990/1.198
There is a single camellia branch that points upward. It starts from the bottom of the painting and ends at the top. There are many twigs that jut branch out from the main branch that have leaves and flowers growing from them. There is a single bird sitting on the branch. There is a seal in the bottom right corner of the painting.
Nishiyama Kan'ei
Bird on Camellia Branch
1850 – 1899
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1990/1.205
There is a single camellia branch that points upward. It starts from the bottom of the painting and ends at the top. There are many twigs that jut branch out from the main branch that have leaves and flowers growing from them;&nbsp;the leaves have a presence in the painting because of their size and their detail. There is a single bird sitting on the branch. There is a seal and signature in the bottom left corner of the painting.
Nishiyama Kan'ei
Birds on Camellia Branch
1850 – 1899
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1990/1.207

Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Stele from Madame Wang's Tomb: 20th century rubbing of a Sui Dynasty tomb slab
20th century
Museum Purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1991/1.121
&quot;The&nbsp;composition&nbsp;is&nbsp;classic&nbsp;for&nbsp;Chikuto&nbsp;with&nbsp;a&nbsp;central&nbsp;foreground&nbsp;grouping&nbsp;of&nbsp;trees, a&nbsp;low&nbsp;middle&nbsp;ground&nbsp;area, and&nbsp;a steeply&nbsp;rising&nbsp;series&nbsp;of&nbsp;hills.&nbsp;The&nbsp;large&nbsp;trees&nbsp;have&nbsp;curving trunks&nbsp;outlined&nbsp;by&nbsp;sinuous&nbsp;dry&nbsp;brushwork&nbsp;that&nbsp;is&nbsp;a&nbsp;Chikuto trademark.&nbsp;The&nbsp;varied&nbsp;brushwork&nbsp;in&nbsp;the&nbsp;foliage&nbsp;suggests&nbsp;a wide&nbsp;variety&nbsp;of&nbsp;plants.&nbsp;The&nbsp;soft&nbsp;pastel&nbsp;tints&nbsp;are characteristic&nbsp;of&nbsp;Chikuto&#39;s, reserved&nbsp;palette.&quot;<br />
<br />
<b id="docs-internal-guid-6eefd8f4-7fff-20d5-0596-42dde0727b25">Adams, Celeste, and Paul Berry. <em>Heart, Mountains, and Human Ways: Japanese Landscape and Figure Painting: a Loan Exhibition from the University of Michigan Museum of Art.</em> Museum of Fine Arts, 1983.</b>&nbsp;
Nakabayashi Chikutō
Mountain Landscape in Summer
1800 – 1849
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1982/2.56
This lightly colored landscape features figures standing on a covered bridge enjoying the distant waterfall. To the left of the painting, there are trees with rocks scattered&nbsp;around on the ground. In the&nbsp;distance, there are mountains that contain a little greenery. The waterfall comes out of these mountains and empties into a river; mist formes from this. In the top left corner of the painting, there is a signature.
Ikeno Taiga;Ikeno Gyokuran
Mountain Landscape
1725 – 1775
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1983/1.354
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