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Results for credit_line:"Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam"

162 UMMA Objects (page 1/14)
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This reddish brown earthenware jar has a globular body and long, widely flared neck. The below surface of the body is adorned with beaten parallel line.<br />
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This is a gray-brown, long-necked, high-fired stoneware jar with a round bottom. Its neck extends up in a straight line before flaring out suddenly near the rim, the edge of which is slightly concave. The body is globular and widest at its middle. Below this part of the vessel are decorations consisting of vertical paddled patterns that are parallel or superimposed. It is likely that the paddled pattern was also applied to the upper and middle parts of the vessel body, but was later erased during the rotation and water smoothing process. The inner surface of the body shows traces of rotation and water smoothing, along with fingerprint marks made in a vertical direction.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 46]<br />
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Round-bottomed storage jar with rolled, uneven rim
5th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.162
It was common in the Gyeongju area, capital of the Silla Kingdom. The jar has a globular body, neck with straight sides and a little straight pedestal foot. Thick ridges encircle the mid upper part of the body and the lower and middle parts of the neck. The lower two sections of the neck are embellished with a delicate wave pattern. The low pedestal foot features eight square perforations at even intervals.<br />
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This is a gray, long-necked, high-fired stoneware jar with a pedestal. The neck is slightly splayed and the mouth curves inwards. Two horizontal ridges on the neck are formed by deeply incised horizontal lines. This method has been repeatedly used to form the other bands, one located on the center of the neck and the other where the neck and body meet. The section between these bands is decorated with a wave design formed by an eleven-tooth comb. The body is widest towards the upper-middle section, and a horizontal ridge, formed by two horizontal incised lines, is located slightly above this
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Storage jar on cut-out pedestal foot
5th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.184
It has a flat base, globular body and straight neck. There is no design on the surface of the body. The attached handle is a little small and thick.<br />
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This is a gray, high-fired stoneware cup with a handle. Its mouth is completely upright, and its rim has a sharp edge. The section immdiately below the mouth tapers inwards and is then connected to the round body. The body is widest at the center. The handle is attached to the lower-central part of the body; the upper end of the handle penetrates the side of the cup, while the lower end is joined by simply rubbing it against the cup&rsquo;s surface. There are traces of rotation and water smoothing on the inner and outer surfaces of the mouth. Natural glaze is visible in the parts around the round base.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 68]</p>
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Small Single-Handed Cup
400 – 599
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.191
Earthenware roof tile-end with molded floral pattern.<br />
The floral medallion on this tile-end consists of bosanghwa(Buddhist floral pattern) motifs which has four heart-shaped petals. The rim is decorated with a chain of beads.<br />
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This dark gray, high-fired earthenware convex eave-end roof tile is decorated with a palmette motif consisting of four petals of a flower in full bloom. Also referred to as the bosanghwa (寶相華, Ch. baoxianghua , a mythical flower often used as a Buddhist decorative motif ), this motif is arranged around a central ovary. Traces of trimming and smoothing with water are visible on the sides of the tile. Traces of clay used to attach this tile to a flat tile can also be seen on the joints.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 39]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Roof Tile-End with Floral Medallion Design
676 – 935
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.200
This stoneware vessel consists of a bowl and lid. The curved hemispheric lid has a ring-shaped knob in the center and is decorated with stamped design irregularly. The high and hemispheric bowl stands on the low foot with a flat base. This part is also decorated with densely and evenly stamped design.<br />
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This is a dark gray, high-fired stoneware lidded bowl. The lid is crowned with a button-shaped knob. A group of ill-defined stamped motifs and two rows of stamped chrysanthemums encircle the knob and decorate the lid. Two thinly incised lines run around the top of the bowl, right below the rim. Below these lines, a vertically aligned continuous horseshoe pattern decorates the outer surface of the bowl. The mouth of the bowl is upright, and the grooved edge of the rim slopes inwards. The widest part of the bowl is located towards the upper part of the body. The foot of the bowl is short and round. There are traces of three thinly incised lines drawn on the bottom of the bowl to attach the foot.
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Cinerary Urn or Reliquary with stamped circle designs
8th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.205A&B
Yuan water bottle from china, 13-14th four loop handles, non-Korean, frequently seen on Yuan shipwrecks 13-14th century, made in Southeast china<br />
(visiting Korean curators from Ehwa University, notes by Min Li 7/07)
<p>This is a brownish-balck glazed jar, produced in the 13th century of Yuan, China. Many of these jars were unearthed in the areas of Gangwha-do Island and Gyeonggi-do. It is still commonly rederred to as &ldquo;Mongolian jars.&rdquo; The entire surface, with the exception of part of the mouth, is coated in brownish-black glaze. Four loop-type lugs are attached to its shoulder. The large amount of sand mixed into the clay produced a rough texture. The flat base of the jar is cracked.</p>
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.142]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Small storage jar with wide mouth and four small 'ears'
13th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.209
This Maebyeong is wide at the shoulder and gradually narrow down to the base. The neck is a little long and body is high.<br />
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This is a dark gray, high-fired stoneware maebyeong (prunus vase). The saucer-shaped vessel mouth is joined to a short, flared neck. The body extends downwards in a straight line from the shoulder before flaring slightly near the base. Its wall is not smoothed leaving it uneven. The shoulder has become contaminated by impurities during firing, and the center of the base is slightly recessed.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 84]</p>
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Maebyeong (Wine Storage Bottle)
918 – 1392
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.211
This is known as a pear shaped bottle vase with widely everted mouth, narrow neck that makes it easy to grasp and a round globular body that is bottom heavy. Five lines encircle the body and neck. Under part of body is damaged a lot. The foot is rather high.<br />
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Many bronze bottles such as the above two have been excavated from Goryeo tombs built between the twelfth and fourteenth centuries along with celadon vessels. This type of bottle with a long neck and widely flared mouth was also produced in celadon during the Goryeo period. The surfaces of both bottles are severely rusted, while the lower part of the bottles are damaged and perforated. The bottles have five rideges formed by attaching folded copper sheets. The foot of each bottle was made separately from a separate sheet of metal and attached later.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017), 243]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Pear-Shaped Bottle
1100 – 1299
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.218
Earthenware stirrup cup with sgraffito design and celadon glaze. A chrysanthemum blossom decorates the tapered base of the cup, and widens into a large middle register with four stylized chrysanthemum medallions. The cup curves back inward toward the rim of the cup, decorated with a fret pattern just below.
<p>This is a conical stirrup cup designed to be inserted into a cup holder. It is a fine piece of celadon with the sudtle beauty of white inlaid decorations in match with the blue-gray body. Its entire outer wall is decorated with inlaid motifs of fret, chrysanthemums, scrolls and lotus petals.<br />
[<em>Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art</em> (2014) p. 128]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Stirrup cup with inlaid sgraffito chrysanthemum and scroll designs
13th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.230
Stoneware lotus-shaped cup and stand with celadon glaze. The cup is shaped in the style of a ten-lobed lotus blossom. On each lobe lies lightly incised chrysanthemum decoration. The cup rests on a pedestal in the design of an inverted lotus flower, which rises from the dish-like base of the stand, mounted on a fluted foot.
<p>This is a flower-shaped cup and stand which offers a good demonstration of the formal splendor of 12th century Goryeo celadon despite yellow-borwn coloration in places. Both the cup and stand have ten lobes and they were produced using molds. On each of the ten lotus petals of the cup and stand is incised a chrysanthemum, and another chrysanthemum design is incised on the upper part of the stand where the cup rests. Around the pedestal on where the cup sits is a band of inverted lotus petals. Each foot of the cup and stand has refractory spur marks.<br />
[<em>Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art</em> (2014) p.125]<br />
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Lobed Lotus-Shaped Cup and Stand with incised floral patterns
12th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.235A&B
This is an eight-lobed bronze mirror in a dark green or blackish green hue. It is divided into two registers by eightlobed ridge, first of which is decorated with floral scrolls. The inner register has two cranes encircling the suspension loop in the center with their wings extended and facing each other. This object may be compared to other crane-patterned mirrors excavated from the Geumcheon-dong tomb site in Cheongju-si, Chungcheongbuk-do Province.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017), 241]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Mirror with Lobed Rim
12th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.236
<p>This is a celadon lidded bowl with the top of the lid decorated with a peony spray design inside a hexafoil outline inlaid with black and white slips. The foot was made by removing clay from the underside of the base and retains traces of quartzite spurs in three places. The glaze was slightly darkened on the upper part with faint gloss. The glaze is poorly fused on the base of the body, leaving practically no sheen. The piece is of high value, however, for the glimpse it offers of Goryeo&rsquo;s refined yet splendid inlaid celadon ware, thanks to its decorative design that depicts a peony in full bloom, inlaid with white clay.<br />
[<em>Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art </em>(2014) p.118]<br />
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Cosmetic Box with inlaid peony (?) design: 6-lobed shape to lip top
1167 – 1199
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.240A&B
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