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Results for credit_line:"Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam"

164 UMMA Objects (page 1/14)
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It is a earthenware with a man riding a small horse with short legs over a thick rectangle plate. There is a lamp-oil container with hole over the hips of the horse, and a spout sticks out in the front breast of the horse, which enables to pour out water through the inside of the stomach of horse. The figure on the horse wears a triangular hat and armor. The left arm is disappeared.<br />
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Oil Lamp in the Shape of an Equestrian Warrior
500 – 549
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.187
Thin-walled jar consisting of a base, globular body, and flaring neck. The piece is decorated with a bubbled design, and the base has evenly spaced rectangular cutouts. The body is incised with two narrow bands of combed wavy patterns that lay just below sets of two indented lines.<br />
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The long neck of this dark gray or yellow-gray, high-fired stoneware jar with a pedestal splays outwards in a straight line. The rim of the jar is narrow and flat, while the neck is divided into two sections by a set of three narrow, sharp and horizontal ridges. The lower neck section features a wave design that was produced using a five-tooth comb. The body is widest towards its upper-middle part, above which is located a single laterally incised line. A wave design has been applied using a three-tooth comb 1.5cm below this line. The pedestal is short, curves slightly outwards and features five square perforations. Overall, the jar is poorly fired, resulting in surface bubbles. The lower part of the jar features a p
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Pedestal Jar with Long Neck
400 – 599
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.175
This lotus medallion designed on this round tile-end consists of thirteen petals. The outer rim is decorated with eighteen round dents. The inner ring of the seedpod contains a big central seed surrounded by seven peripheral seeds. The outer rim is embellished with a bead pattern.<br />
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This gray-white, low-fired earthenware tile features a single-tier, thirteen-petal lotus design and is made from fine clay. The large lotus seed at the center of the ovary is surrounded by seven slightly smaller seeds. Evidence of repair using gray clay is visible on the reverse side of the tile.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p.37]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Roof Tile
676 – 935
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.199
A square porcelain water dropper. The porcelain is white and there is an image of a lizard or dragon on the top. Clouds are depicted on the sides with the image of a flying crane on the front of the square. The white glaze has chipped of or is thin in places, revealing the copper underglaze.<br />
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This is a cubic water dropper featuring an openwork design of a crane with wings spread on the upper face. The spout is in the shape of a newt; it is designed in the way that water drops from the mouth of the newt. The side walls feature cloud designs in copper red which were blackened during firing. The entire foot was glazed, but the glaze was wiped away from the foot, on which were placed fine sand support during firing.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.182]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
White Porcelain Square Water Dropper with Openwork Cloud and Crane Design
1867 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.279
Inlaying silver into ironware was a popular method of decorating metalwork that required high levels of skill. Numerous items were produced with inlay decorations. The entire lid and body of this hexagonal case are decorated with inlaid silver. The lid features a hexagonal design in its center surrounded by a continuous four-leaf flower design. The six sides of the body are decorated by three pairs of turtle designs, crane designs and deer designs, arranged alternately. The lid and body are bordered with a fret-patterned band. This case with a flat base is excellently preserved. This type of iron-lidded case with inlaid silver design was produced in large quantities from the nineteenth century to the early twentieth century, continuing through the Japanese annexation of the Korean Peninsula. Such cases are mostly octagonal; this is a rare hexagonal example.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017), 244]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Hexagonal Tobacco Box with Lid
1850 – 1950
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.280A&B
This white porcelain incense burner, featuring an openwork design on the body, is made of fine clay with high-iron content, which has tinged the surface with dark gray. The glaze has been removed from the part covered by the lid, exposing the red body. The foot is entirely glazed; sand spurs were supported in some parts of the foot rim during firing. Cracks formed in the foot and the base during firing. This object has a larger belly and narrower foot than typical traditional white porcelain incense burners.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.202]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Incense burner with openwork design
1850 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.284
This carp-shaped water dropper is unique in that its tail is larger than those of many similar vessels. The vessel was entirely glazed including the base and retains wide marks of refractory spurs in three places. This is one of many figurative water droppers produced in large quantities within the vicinity of Bunwon-ri, Gwangju-si, and Yeoju-si in Gyeonggi-do in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.184]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Blue-and-White Water Dropper in the shape of a fish
1850 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.287
The inner surface of this dish is decorated with stamped design of straw cord, over which has been widely brushed a thick layer of white slip. White slip is also thinly applied to the outer surface. There are spur marks on the inner base, indicating that dish was stacked among others during firing. Such stamped buncheong ware was generally supplied to government offices.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.150]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Buncheong ware shallow bowl with rope curtain design
15th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.270
Many buncheong dishes of this kind were produced in Chungcheongnam-do and Jeollanam-do. Chinese &ldquo;太&rdquo; (&ldquo;tae;&rdquo; highest; greatest) is incised on the inner wall. This dish is thickly coated with white slip on its inner and outer surfaces. The dish was produced from coarse, colored clay containing large amounts of sand, and it is poorly sintered, resulting in the loss of slip in many areas.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.157]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Buncheong ware saucer with character "Tae (太)" (large)
16th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.274
This dark grayish-blue earthenware vessel is from the Goryeo period. The neck flares out toward the top and the mouth spreads out to the side. The neck is encircled by a thick incised line. A lot of thin lines are encircled on the body. The body has gently sloping sides that flare out and then taper down toward the base and is slightly flatted. Flatted bottle was produced by making a globular body first on the wheel, then flattening it on both sides.<br />
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This is a dark gray, high-fired stoneware bottle. Its neck curves outwards and is connected to a rim with a round edge. The body is widest at its middle. The bottle is entirely covered in distinct traces of rotation and water smoothing.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 83]</p>
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Stacking Bottle (with flattened sides)
918 – 1392
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.208
<p>The decoration technique of stamping designs into vessel&rsquo;s surface and filling them with a white slip was continued from Goryeo celadon to buncheong ware. Three or four horizontal lines of chrysanthemum run around the rim. There are three spur marks on the inner base: this is the result of stacking vessels on top of one another during ring, separated by supports. Coarse grains of sand are stuck on the outer base and foot. The clay used for this bowl is fine and contains small amount of sand, while the glaze is pale green in color and well fused. Despite having become warped in the kiln, this bowl well illustrates the crude yet solid characteristics of buncheong ware.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.146]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Buncheong ware bowl with stamped and incised designs in white slip
15th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.261
This is a ritual bowl with a high foot. A same type of this bowl is found in the storeroom of Changdeokgung Palace. It was coated with the transparent glaze with pale blue tints. The glazed surface is impeccable. The qualities of the clay and glaze suggest that this bowl was produced at the kiln in Bunwon-ri, Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do in the late 19th century, the last official court kiln of the Joseon Dynasty.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.194]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Deep bowl on high foot
19th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.300
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