31 UMMA Objects
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Japanese (Japanese (culture or style))
Incense burner
19th century
Transfer from the School of Art and the College of Architecture and Urban Planning.
1997/1.214

Iranian (Iranian)
Incense burner lid with peacock-shaped finial
12th century
Museum Purchase
1959/1.111

Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Small Incense Burner with Lid
19th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.309A&B
This is a round bottomed bowl on three legs with high straight sides and and everted rim. It is covered in a green celadon craqueleur glaze.
Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Incense Burner
15th century
Gift of Domino's Pizza, Inc.
1993/1.108

Matsumoto Tetsuzan
Incense Container
TC2006.6.1A&B

Japanese (Japanese (culture or style))
Incense burner with openwork lid
19th century
Transfer from the School of Art and the College of Architecture and Urban Planning.
1997/1.233A&B

Seifū Yohei III
Incense burner
early 1880s - early 1910s
Bequest of Margaret Watson Parker
1954/1.498

Seifū Yohei III
Incense container (kôro)
early 1880s - early 1910s
Bequest of Margaret Watson Parker
1954/1.516

Japanese (Japanese (culture or style))
Celadon incense jar, cylindrical shape with three legs and silver grill lid
19th century
Bequest of Margaret Watson Parker
1954/1.531A&B
Blue and white square incense burner with a painting of a dragon, clouds, waves, and an inscription.
Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Blue-and-white square incense burner
1844
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1985/2.47
A cylindrical, everted stoneware vessel with animal mask tripod legs applied to the sides.  The body of the vessel is incised with roundels containing peonies surrounded by silk worm scrolls contained between bands of floral meander.  It is covered in a green celadon glaze. 
Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Incense Burner
1368 – 1644
Gift of Domino's Pizza, Inc.
1993/1.109
This white porcelain incense burner, featuring an openwork design on the body, is made of fine clay with high-iron content, which has tinged the surface with dark gray. The glaze has been removed from the part covered by the lid, exposing the red body. The foot is entirely glazed; sand spurs were supported in some parts of the foot rim during firing. Cracks formed in the foot and the base during firing. This object has a larger belly and narrower foot than typical traditional white porcelain incense burners.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.202]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Incense burner with openwork design
1850 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.284
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