71 UMMA Objects
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It has a flat base, globular body and straight neck. Two narrow ridges encircle the body and a ridge encircles between the body and neck. The attached handle is a little small and get twisted.<br />
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This is a dark gray, low-fired stoneware cup with a handle. The almost-upright mouth gently inclines inwards, and the rim has a narrow, slightly rounded edge. Separated from the mouth by a horizontal ridge, the body is widest at its upper-central part. Two horizontal ridges encircle the body of the cup where the body is at its widest. The lower part of the body has been pared twice at different angles during rotation.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 70]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Large cup with globular body, cylindrical neck and twisted-vine handle
5th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.192
A ceramic rounded bowl with a tall, trapered cylindrical stand with a wide lip. The base is detailed with staggered square cut-outs that run from the lip to the middle of the base.<br />
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This is a dark-gray, single-tiered, perforated, high-fired stoneware stem cup. The body of the cup curves upwards, and the rim has a sharp edge, while the inner surface of the mouth is tapered. A deep incised line divides the pedestal into its upper and lower halves; the lower half features square perforations. A natural glaze is pooled at the base of the cup, while the bottom of the outer surface shows traces of rotation and water smoothing.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 65]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Bowl with Stand
6th century
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.72
A ceramic rounded bowl with a tall, trapered cylindrical stand with a lip. The base is detailed with staggered rectangular cut-outs that run from the lip to where the base meets the bowl.<br />
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This is a gray, low-fired stem cup that has a perforated, singletiered pedestal. The sides of the bowl curve upwards, and the rim has a sharp edge. The inner and outer surfaces of the cup show traces of rotation and water smoothing, while the base shows traces of clay attachments. The trumpet-shaped pedestal features three rectangular perforations.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 65]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Bowl with Stand
6th century
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.71

Japanese (Japanese (culture or style))
Cup, one of a pair
19th century
Transfer from the School of Art and the College of Architecture and Urban Planning.
1997/1.250.2
A red earthenware ear cup (<em>erbei </em>二杯) with an ovoid body with two opposing wing-like handles applied to the rim.  It was covered in a green lead glaze with iridescence and calcification.
Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Ear Cup
25 – 220
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1990/1.262
A round ceramic fitted lid for a bowl.<br />
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This is a gray, high-fired stoneware cup. The flange of the cup slopes inwards, and the rim has a sharp edge. The gallery supporting the lid protrudes a short distance, below which a single, incised, horizontal line encircles the cup. Faint traces of natural glaze can be found on the inner surface of the vessel.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 73]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Lid for Bowl
6th century
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.73

Oswalt Haussner
Shell Cup
1635 – 1645
Museum purchase in honor of Professor Marvin Eisenberg, made possible by the W. Hawkins Ferry Fund
2008/1.164
A very small cup of a rounded shape with a slightly everted rim, standing on a relatively high, straight foot. The exterior of the bowl is decorated in two horizontal registers with geometric and abstracted natural motifs drawn with a very free hand in cobalt blue pigment, before a white glaze was applied to the whole cup. The interior of the foot is glazed brown.
Kiln Unknown, Vietnam
Blue-and-white cup with brown glaze inside foot
16th century
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1993/2.21
A small ceramic tea cup. Ochre and red with tan colorations more towards the top of the cup.
Kubota Naobumi
Tea Bowl (Chawan)
1973
Gift of Ann Holmes
2013/1.303
A stoneware, bowl-shaped cup on a tall foot ring with an articulated five-lobed rim. It is covered in a crackled celadon glaze. 
Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Cup
1368 – 1644
Gift of Mr. F. Karel Wiest
1982/2.2
This cup is divided three parts into mouth, midsection and lower part of the body. The mouth is slightly everted. A handle is attached starting below the second band and ending close to the bottom. There is a line between each part. The color is green and the surface is not trimmed well.<br />
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This is an extremely robust, high-fired earthenware cup with handle, gray-black on its upper part and red-brown on its lower part. Its mouth is slightly flared, and its rim has a sharp edge. A deep horizontal line is incised to form wide raised bands that mark the intersection of the mouth and body of the cup. The body is widest at its center. A loopshaped handle is attached vertically to the body; its upper end penetrates the side of the cup, while its lower end is attached by pressing it against the wall. The base of the cup is flat, and the lower part of the outer surface retains traces of paring while rotating.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p.69]<br />
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Large cup with handle
5th century
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1982/2.55
It has a flat base, globular body and straight neck. There is no design on the surface of the body. The attached handle is a little small and thick.<br />
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This is a gray, high-fired stoneware cup with a handle. Its mouth is completely upright, and its rim has a sharp edge. The section immdiately below the mouth tapers inwards and is then connected to the round body. The body is widest at the center. The handle is attached to the lower-central part of the body; the upper end of the handle penetrates the side of the cup, while the lower end is joined by simply rubbing it against the cup&rsquo;s surface. There are traces of rotation and water smoothing on the inner and outer surfaces of the mouth. Natural glaze is visible in the parts around the round base.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 68]</p>
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Small Single-Handed Cup
400 – 599
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.191
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