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Results for classification:"bowl"

421 UMMA Objects (page 1/36)
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Round bowl with a dark patina and raised lip. Around the top edge of the bowl is a row of raised triangular projections. 
Bowl
1900 – 1950
Gift of Dr. James and Vivian Curtis
2000/2.115

Japanese (Japanese (culture or style))
Imari bowl with green dragon center
1867 – 1899
Gift of the William T. and Dora G. Hunter Collection
2002/2.15
Brass vessel cast in a rounded bowl form. A small loop near the vessel's lip may have served as an attachment point for a hinged lid. The vessel has various geometric and curvilinear designs across the body. 
Akan (Akan (culture or style))
Vessel
20th century
Gift of Dr. Daniel and Sandra Mato
2003/2.33
It has a outward-turned rim. The side of the body is becoming narrow in the base. The bottem is flat.<br />
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This yellowish brown, bowl-shaped, low-fired earthenware vessel is made from fine clay mixed with fine sand particles. It has no neck. The mouth is slightly everted while the rim is generally flat and features some grooves. The body is widest towards the upper-middle section, and the flat base is rounded where it joins the body. Parts of the vessel feature a paddled pattern which suggests that the surface was first paddled and then smoothed with water on a rotary device.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 44]<br />
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Bowl with flat bottom and flat rolled rim
298 – 299
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.160
<p>This celadon bowl is undecorated. The glaze is poorly fused and is generally opaque. The foot is low and displays traces of sand supports. The sand, stuck to the foot and the outer base, suggests that the bowl was placed on the kiln floor during ring. Glaze had run down to the outer wall of the foot and accumulated, in parts.<br />
[<em>Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art</em> (2014) p.97]</p>
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shallow bowl, grey color, sanf grit on foot, made in Boryung kiln of ching chung nam-do, often found in tombs in Kangwa Island, 13th century, diameter 6+13/16 inches, height: 1+7/8 inches
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Kanghwa Bowl
12th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.212
<p>The inner surface of this bowl features an incised design of two parrots with long tails resembling phoenixes. e entire body of the bowl was glazed including the rim of the foot, on which remain three quartzite spur marks. Although some fireclay has fallen inside the kiln during ring and adhered to the inner surface of the bowl, the state of sintering is good. The piece as a whole is a high-quality ware with a glossy surface and a fine color of glaze. The base of the foot is cracked which occurred while drying before the application of glaze.<br />
[<em>Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art </em>(2014) p.94]</p>
high quality, incised, double-parrot motif shallow bowl, nice shallow fully glazed foot, three spur marks, firing discoloration, kiln trash fall on glaze, 11th century.
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Bowl with incised pattern of paired phoenixes
1067 – 1132
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.215
Deep porcelain bowl with wide foot, fine body, and colorless glaze.<br />
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This high-quality white porcelain bowl is presumed to have been produced at official court kilns around Usan-ri, Gwangju-si, Gyeonggido. The well-levigated clay of finest quality was used for this bowl. Sagger was used to protect the bowl during firing to attain its pure white, immaculate surface. Entire foot of the bowl was glazed, and the foot was placed upon a fine white sand support to make the surface as clean as possible. The outer base is enscribed with Chinese character &ldquo;天&quot; (&ldquo;Cheon;&rdquo; sky, heaven)&rdquo; by scraping off the glaze. The characters &ldquo;大&rdquo; (&ldquo;Dae;&rdquo; big; great)&rdquo; and &ldquo;黃&rdquo; (&ldquo;Hwang;&rdquo; yellow) have been stippled after firing. Finely fused and sintered, this bowl exemplifies the essence of white porcelain made from offical court kilns, which is robust and white as a white jade.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (20
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Deep Bowl
15th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.265
Many dishes of this kind were produced in Jeollanam-do. The inner and outer surfaces of this dish have been coated in a thick layer of white slip. On the reverse side, slip has only been painted on the upper part, leaving exposed clay body towards the bottom. Seven spur marks remain on both the inner bottom and on the foot. Much slip has peeled off from the outer surface, which also features a large number of pinholes.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.157]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Ido chawan or shallow bowl
16th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.272
This type of bowl, with an inverted rim and hollow inside, is known as an <em>okbari</em> or <em>omok-bansanggi</em> (concave tableware). Considering its size, it was probably used for serving steamed rice. The tall foot was made separately before being attached. One line is incised around the outer rim of the bowl, which gently slopes inwards. The nipple-shaped handle is fixed to the top of the lid by a nail. The head of a nail joining the foot to the base of the bowl is visible on the indented base of the foot.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017), 249]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Covered Bowl
1600 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.304A&B
This rice bowl, or <em>jubal</em>, has a flat base. Normally, such rice bowls are classified into three different sizes: large, medium-sized and small. Their shapes are almost identical.<br />
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<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 250]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Bowl
1600 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.305
A shallow basin with a flat bottom and gently curved sides, a slightly inverted direct rim, and a single duck shaped spoon, seperate but meant to be placed in the center of the base.  It is covered in a gray-green celadon glaze.
Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Bowl with Duck-Shaped Spoon
317 – 439
Gift of Ping and Zenobia Lee
2005/2.87A&B
A shallow basin with flat bottom and gently curved sides, a slightly inverted direct rim, and a single reclining dog sculpted in the center of the base.  It is covered in a gray-green celadon glaze.
Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Bowl with Dog
317 – 439
Gift of Ping and Zenobia Lee
2005/2.84
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