242 UMMA Objects
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<p>Carved on both sides, this wooden printing block records Origin of Household Rites (家禮源流,&nbsp;Garyewollyu), a collection of writings on household rites categorized and summarized during the reign of&nbsp;King Hyeonjong (顯宗, r. 1659-1674) of Joseon by a scholar named Yu Gye (兪棨, 1607-1664). This block&nbsp;contains part of Fascicle 4 of the text Origins of Household Rites entitled &ldquo;Going to Welcome the Bride (親迎, chinyeong, Ch. qinying),&rdquo; the procedure in which the groom welcomes the bride at a wedding ceremony.&nbsp;Korea was the first country in the world to use the technique of carving letters on woodblocks and using them&nbsp;for printing. After the invention of metal type in the early Joseon period, woodblock printing was used to&nbsp;publish scriptures, anthologies and family records in Buddhist temples, Confucian academies and households.</p>

<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 290]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Wood Block for Printing
19th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.316

Thai
One of Ten-Piece Set of Altar Tables
19th century
Gift of Doris Duke's Southeast Asian Art Collection
2005/1.466.2

Thai
One of Ten-Piece Set of Altar Tables
19th century
Gift of Doris Duke's Southeast Asian Art Collection
2005/1.466.3

Thai
One of Ten-Piece Set of Altar Tables
19th century
Gift of Doris Duke's Southeast Asian Art Collection
2005/1.466.6

Thai
One of Ten-Piece Set of Altar Tables
19th century
Gift of Doris Duke's Southeast Asian Art Collection
2005/1.466.9
Large oblong, rectangular wooden bowl with rounded ends.<br />
<br />
These large bowls (<em>hamji</em>) were made by carving out large, single pieces of wood. Notches or handles have been carved out on two opposite sides of the outer walls, making them easy to carry. Round hamji bowls were sometimes carved on a turning lathe, but those with notches could be made by carving out single lengths of wood with an adz. These bowls were used in towns and the countryside alike. Affluent households would possess sets of large, medium-sized, and small bowls with notches piled up together. When grinding mung beans, beans, or red beans, such bowls are placed below a grindstone supported by a tripod.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 274]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Wooden Bowl
1850 – 1950
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.29
A wood carving of a woman holding an apple over her head.
Andre Dimanche
Eve with Apple
20th century
Gift of Dr. James L. Curtis
2011/2.182

Baga
Staff
Gift of Margaret H. and Albert J. Coudron
2001/2.4

Tabwa (Tabwa)
Staff
Gift of Margaret H. and Albert J. Coudron
2001/2.26
Staff with a short, pointed handle. The top of the handle is surmounted by a rectangle with two inverted triangles. Underneath the triangles is a small face and a neck with four raised grooves.  
Igbo (Igbo (Southern Nigerian style, culture))
Staff
20th century
Gift of Margaret H. and Albert J. Coudron
2001/2.43
This wooden Chokwe staff features a smooth, narrow rod and a large carving of a female figure at its finial.  The female bears an elaborate, ridged coiffure, closed, coffee-bean shaped eyes, raised scarifications on her face, torso, and back, rounded shoulders, arms positioned down by her side, and a protruding navel. 
Chokwe (Chokwe (culture or style))
Staff
1900 – 1950
Gift of Margaret H. and Albert J. Coudron
2001/2.69
This wooden staff has pieces of cloth wrapped on both extensions. One end depicts an abstract anthropomorphic face, while the other appears to function as a handle and is embellished with two strings of black and white beads and a loop of blue and white beads.
Kongo (Kongo (culture or style))
Staff
1900 – 1950
Gift of Margaret H. and Albert J. Coudron
2001/2.73
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