1777 UMMA Objects
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Burial wares are those placed in tombs as a way of praying for the continued happiness and comfort of the deceased in the afterlife. Offering vessels produced in the Joseon period included smaller reproductions of the vessels used every day, such as jars, boxes, and bowls, among others. The University of Michigan Museum of Art houses a set of white porcelain offering vessels buried in pit graves between the late 16th century and early 17th century. The vessels are coated in pale blue glaze but generally tinged with gray. They were fired without using saggers, while resting on fine sand supports. Their glaze is relatively well applied and fused. The cintamani-shaped knobs on the lids are similar to those found on the lids of vessels produced at white porcelain kilns near Seondong-ri and Songjeong-ri in Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do in the 17th century.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.192]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Burial Set (15 plates, 16 bowls and 6 lids)
17th century
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.79.26
Burial wares are those placed in tombs as a way of praying for the continued happiness and comfort of the deceased in the afterlife. Offering vessels produced in the Joseon period included smaller reproductions of the vessels used every day, such as jars, boxes, and bowls, among others. The University of Michigan Museum of Art houses a set of white porcelain offering vessels buried in pit graves between the late 16th century and early 17th century. The vessels are coated in pale blue glaze but generally tinged with gray. They were fired without using saggers, while resting on fine sand supports. Their glaze is relatively well applied and fused. The cintamani-shaped knobs on the lids are similar to those found on the lids of vessels produced at white porcelain kilns near Seondong-ri and Songjeong-ri in Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do in the 17th century.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.189]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Burial Set (15 plates, 16 bowls and 6 lids)
17th century
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.79.17
Burial wares are those placed in tombs as a way of praying for the continued happiness and comfort of the deceased in the afterlife. Offering vessels produced in the Joseon period included smaller reproductions of the vessels used every day, such as jars, boxes, and bowls, among others. The University of Michigan Museum of Art houses a set of white porcelain offering vessels buried in pit graves between the late 16th century and early 17th century. The vessels are coated in pale blue glaze but generally tinged with gray. They were fired without using saggers, while resting on fine sand supports. Their glaze is relatively well applied and fused. The cintamani-shaped knobs on the lids are similar to those found on the lids of vessels produced at white porcelain kilns near Seondong-ri and Songjeong-ri in Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do in the 17th century.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.187]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Burial Set (15 plates, 16 bowls and 6 lids)
17th century
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.79.6
Burial wares are those placed in tombs as a way of praying for the continued happiness and comfort of the deceased in the afterlife. Offering vessels produced in the Joseon period included smaller reproductions of the vessels used every day, such as jars, boxes, and bowls, among others. The University of Michigan Museum of Art houses a set of white porcelain offering vessels buried in pit graves between the late 16th century and early 17th century. The vessels are coated in pale blue glaze but generally tinged with gray. They were fired without using saggers, while resting on fine sand supports. Their glaze is relatively well applied and fused. The cintamani-shaped knobs on the lids are similar to those found on the lids of vessels produced at white porcelain kilns near Seondong-ri and Songjeong-ri in Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do in the 17th century.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.187]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Burial Set (15 plates, 16 bowls and 6 lids)
17th century
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.79.3

Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Kneeling Female Figure
206 BCE – 220 CE
Gift of Jiu-Hwa Lo Upshur
2007/2.72

Artist Unknown;John A. Foster
Vase with cutout design
1930 – 1940
Gift of John A. Foster
1943.202
Light green bowl with tan accents. Scalloped edges and sides.
Artist Unknown;John A. Foster
Scalloped Bowl
1930 – 1940
Gift of John A. Foster
1943.200

Artist Unknown;John A. Foster
Bowl with turquoise glaze
1930 – 1940
Gift of John A. Foster
1943.199

Artist Unknown;John A. Foster
Bowl
1930 – 1940
Gift of John A. Foster
1943.206

Artist Unknown;John A. Foster
Vase with cutout design
1930 – 1940
Gift of John A. Foster
1943.204

Artist Unknown;John A. Foster
Vase with white glaze and blue designs
1930 – 1940
Gift of John A. Foster
1943.239
Brown with floral design in the center.
Artist Unknown;John A. Foster
Bowl with scalloped edge
1930 – 1940
Gift of John A. Foster
1943.184
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