77 UMMA Objects
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Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Bi disk
9794 BCE – 220 CE
Museum purchase from the collection of Max Loehr
1960/2.96

Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Ceremonial Blade
960 – 1279
Gift of the Estate of Agnes E. Meyer
1971/2.98

Dogon (Dogon (culture or style))
Ritual Staff
20th century
Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Irving F. Burton
1975/1.69
A figure is sitting on a lotus-shaped pedestal, which is itself placed on an hexagonal pedestal. The figure wears a drape hanging from the left shoulder and covering the bottom. The arms are placed in front; right hand holding the left index finger. The facial expression is calm; the two eyes looking down; a dot on the forehead. Two elongated ears. A tall crown on the head. The two halos are on the back of the figure; one behind the head and other behind the torso. Two halos are surrounded by an oval-shaped dais. The statue and pedestals are guilded with gold; some polychrome remnants.
Japanese (Japanese (culture or style))
Vairocana Buddha (Japanese, Dainichi Nyorai)
17th century
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
2003/2.59.1
The gray jar with a little long neck has a foot with rectangular perforations and is potted with fine silt-based clay. The relatively thin mouth is slightly everted. Three deep incisions encircle the midsection of the neck. The globular body is decorated with two incised line encircled the body. The foot whose bottom is rolled outward is a little high and wide.<br />
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This is a dark gray, long-necked, high-fired stoneware jar with a pedestal. It has a diagonally splayed neck that is encircled with two raised bands formed by narrowly incised lines. The rim has a rounded edge. The shape of the body is spheroidal, while a raised band marks the boundary between the neck and body. The body, which is widest at its center, is engraved with two shallow horizontal lines that create a wide raised band. The short pedestal and the vessel body are joined smoothly. The pedestal features four square perforations and spreads out horizontally near the bottom edge.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Storage Jar on cut-out pedestal foot
500 – 699
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.174
The gray jar with a little long neck has a foot with rectangular perforations and is potted with fine silt-based clay. The relatively thin mouth is slightly everted. Three deep incisions encircle the midsection of the neck. The globular body is decorated with two incised line encircled the body. The foot whose bottom is rolled outward is a little high and wide.<br />
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The long and splayed neck of this blue-gray, high-fired stoneware jar is encircled by two sets of ridges. The set on the upper section of the neck has two ridges, and the set on the lower section has one ridge. The rim is narrow and round. The inner surface of the neck shows rough, uneven surfaces resulting from wheel throwing. The body is widest at its middle. The vessel surface has been smoothed by paring on a wheel after attaching the low pedestal. The pedestal shows six rectangular perforations.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 51]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Storage Jar on cut-out pedestal foot
400 – 599
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.176
A stoneware vessel designed for pouring or possibly to serve as an oil lamp, in the shape of a duck. The lower half of the duck&#39;s body and &quot;legs&quot; are formed by a shallow bowl on an openwork pedestal; the sides of the bowl have been compressed to make an elongated shape. The upper half of the duck&#39;s body, and its neck and head are formed by hand, The duck&#39;s body is hollow, with two aperture: liquids can be poured in through a funnel with a cup-shaped mouth on the duck&#39;s back, and liquids can be poured out through a wide opening at the tail.<br />
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This is a gray or gray-orange, duck-shaped, low-fired earthenware vessel. Its semi-globular spout is attached to the upper part of the duck&rsquo;s back, while a 2.8cm wide hole, which appears to have been used for pouring liquids, is located at the tail end. The duck&rsquo;s beak is flat and wide, and its eyes are expressed by an incised dot and circle. The lower part of the body features three ridges that form a wave design. The pe
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Vessel in the shape of a duck
200 – 399
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.188
It has a flat base, globular body and straight neck. There was a bubbling of the clay surface during firing. The attached handle is a little small and thick.<br />
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This is a yellowish gray, low-fired earthenware cup with a handle. The mouth is upright, while the rest of the body has a swollen belly and a round base. The handle attached to the lower middle section of the body is not functional. Traces of rotation and water smoothing are visible on the inner and outer surfaces of the mouth.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 68]</p>
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Small Single-Handed Cup
5th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.190
This stoneware vessel consists of a bowl and lid. The curved hemispheric lid has a ring-shaped knob in the center and is decorated a lot of dot line design. The hemispheric bowl stands on the low foot with a flat base. This part is also decorated with stamped design.<br />
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This is a dark gray, high-fired stoneware lidded bowl decorated with a stamped design. A ring-shaped knob at the top of the lid is surrounded by vertically aligned dotted designs radiating outwards. The bowl rim is rounded, while two narrowly incised lines surround its widest part, located just below the lip of the rim where the lid rests. Below these lines, the body is stamped with a continuous, vertically aligned, horseshoe pattern. The short and broad horseshoe motif conveys a sense of stability.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 78]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Cinerary Urn or Reliquary with stamped "fish scale" designs
600 – 799
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.204A&B
Covered ceramic jar with brilliantly colored Thai-inspired overglaze enamel painting in floral patterns.  The lid mimics the spires of Thai Buddhist architecture, rising from the gentle curve of the lower portion of the lid and alternating between solid bands of green, and multicolored floral patterns.  The green covers what would be the underside of each of the colorful three tiers of "roof" segments, culminating in what appears to be a red and gold lotus bud at the top of the lid.
Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Bencharong Ware Jar (tho)
19th century
Gift of Doris Duke's Southeast Asian Art Collection
2005/1.465A&B

Baga
Staff
Gift of Margaret H. and Albert J. Coudron
2001/2.4
A tall cylindrical vessel on mamiform tri-pod feet with an everted, flaring, and direct rim. It has a black burnished body with reddish-buff feet. 
Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Tripod Jar
2200 BCE – 1600 BCE
Gift of www.silkroadtrade.com owners Seung Man Kim, Robert Piao, Daniel Shin and Hemin Quan
2003/2.22
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