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Results for terms:traditional medicine

12 UMMA Objects (page 1/1)
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A conical stopper, topped by an anthropomorphic representation of a female head with elaborate coiffure. 
Luba (Luba (culture or style))
Stopper
1895 – 1905
Museum purchase made possible by the Betty J. Lockett Memorial Fund
1984/2.40
This anthropomorphic <em>nkisi</em>, or power figure, stands upright and features a rather large, forward-tilting head with a prominent, parted mouth, high cheekbones with shallow cheeks, and chipped glass-encrusted lower eyes. A brass tack pierces the figure’s forehead, directly above its nose.  The figure possesses a rectangular torso and robust appendages, although the lower arms and feet are missing. The figure likely held a medicine pack upon its abdomen, evidenced by the four holes bored into its torso, and another one upon its cranium. Around the figure’s neck is a collar, possibly of leather, another place in which medicines are carried.
Vili (Kongo) (Vili)
Power Figure
1845 – 1855
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.179
This small figure is that of a dog who has short legs, a thick, curled tail, small ears, and an elongated muzzle. Its mouth is open with pointed teeth bared and tongue slightly hanging. Its eyes include small mirrors and feature the white mineral <em>kaolin</em>. On the dog’s back is a large, mirror-topped medicine pack which has been sealed with resin.  There are two recesses on top of both hind legs which also likely held packets of medicine.  Near the top of the two front legs are hollow projections, which have broken off.
Vili (Kongo) (Vili)
Power Figure
1845 – 1855
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.182
This anthropomorphic <em>nkisi</em>, or power figure, stands upright with its head turned 90 degrees to the side. Like many <em>minkisi</em>, this one features a wide range of materials. A long metal chain hangs around its neck and a fiber packet containing medicinal substances is tied across its forehead with its loose ends dangling far below. More fiber is wrapped around its lower torso. The face features a slightly parted mouth and large eyes with attentive, black pupils. Protruding from the figure is a large, prominent belly, upon which is affixed a small horn.  
Vili (Kongo) (Vili)
Power Figure
1870 – 1880
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.177
A sculpture of a wooden figure that has been tightly wrapped in layers of cloth and animal skin, concealing the neck, arms and torso of the figure, and secured in place by a plaited fiber.  Animal skin binds the legs which stand apart and are slightly flexed at the knees.  Around the torso, a cracked-open seed pod is held in place by a piece of wood affixed to the front of the body. The oval shaped head features pierced pupils and a simple coiffure.  
Zombo (Zombo)
Power figure
1900 – 1925
Anonymous Gift
1985/1.186
Hollowed cone-shaped vessel with a thinly tapered, extended tip. Vessel is designed with various geometric shapes including repetitive diamond and square patterns.
Kuba (Kuba (Democratic Republic of Congo style))
Clyster
1895 – 1905
Museum Purchase made possible by the Friends of the Museum of Art
1984/2.27
This small power figure features a naturalistic human face engulfed in layers of multi-media attachments, which create an imposing visual effect. The figure wears a blue turban wrapped around its head that binds bundles of medicinal substances and is crowned with several feathers. It also dons a metal necklace and a small bone dangles from the arm. The lower body is covered in fiber and a skirt of long leather strips. Possessing eyes encrusted with glass, the figure stands on top of a carved wooden turtle and holds the tip of a curved piece of wood in its mouth, the other end of which terminates in its clutched right hand. A large medicine pack, topped with a round mirror, is affixed to the figure's torso, which is thickly coated with resin and red pigment.
Yombe (Yombe (culture or style))
Power Figure
1850 – 1899
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.191
This figure sits serenely in a cross-legged position with one hand raised to the chin and the other resting upon on a knee. The figure's prominent rounded cheekbones, eyes embedded with pieces of mirror, large ears, and broad shoulders are typical traits seen in Vili carved figures. The figure is decorated with tukula powder and kaolin and has a worn, reddish-brown patina. The cavity at the back of the head and another in the abdomen indicate that this figure once bore potent medicinal substances and operated as an <em>nkisi</em>, an object of power.
Vili (Kongo) (Vili)
Power Figure
1795 – 1805
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.180
This carved wooden figure depicts a standing female, and is one of a pair that includes a male figure also carved by the same hand. According to noted art historian Niangi Batulukisi, these two figures deviate from the classical Bembe style and are “an extreme rarity” due to the fact that they are likely connected to an ancient pre-Bembe style.<br /><br />
The female figure’s trunk is disproportionately long, while the legs appear stockier and are slightly flexed at the knees. Her facial features include narrow eyes set in round, ocular cavities and an open mouth. The hairstyle is of a simple design. The breasts and the umbilicus protrude outward, the shoulders curve inward, and the palms of the hand rest upon either side of the abdomen. Traces of tukula powder can be found upon the figure’s surface.<br /><br />
It is almost certain that the female figure’s torso was at one point wrapped with medicinal ingredients, just like her male counterpart. Moreover, a hole appears on the crown of her head, likely inten
Bembe (Bembe (Kongo))
Female Figure
1865 – 1875
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.196.1
This large and commanding Songye <em>nkisi</em> carved from wood depicts a male figure with the following characteristics: a large head whose crown is covered in stunning copper; almond shaped eyes; a large, oblong mouth; metal tacks across the temples; and a bold, trapezoidal chin. The figure’s hands rest on either side of its protruding belly, which bears a round mark representing its umbilicus. The <em>nkisi</em> dons a vegetable fiber loincloth which has been affixed by raffia. A trio of necklaces serve as adornments while a medicinal pestle dangles from its waist. Also remarkable is the handsome leather purse which the figure carries around its arm. 
Songye (Songye)
Power Figure
1885 – 1895
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.227
This carved wooden figure depicts a standing male, and is one of a pair that includes a female figure also carved by the same hand. According to noted art historian Niangi Batulukisi, these two figures deviate from the classical Bembe style and are “an extreme rarity” due to the fact that they are likely connected to an ancient pre-Bembe style.<br /><br />
The male figure’s trunk is disproportionately long, while the legs are slightly flexed at the knees. His facial features includes closed eyes set in round, ocular cavities and a perfectly rounded, open mouth.  The hairstyle bears geometric motifs. Most striking, however, is that medicinal substances have been tied around the male’s entire torso--indeed from his neck to his pelvis--by tightly-wound, resin-covered strings. Moreover, a hole appears on the crown of his head, likely intended for the placement of an animal horn containing even more medicinal ingredients. A small sliver of a white shell appears across the figure’s chest. Traces of tukula powder ca
Bembe (Bembe (Kongo))
Male Figure
1865 – 1875
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.196.2
This Songye&nbsp;<em>nkisi,&nbsp;</em>which depicts a standing male figure, displays many of the characteristic hallmarks of Songye anthropomorphic carvings, namely: an overall strong geometric form, squared shoulders, a large head, a triangular face with a rounded forehead and concave cheeks, deep ocular cavities, a rectangular mouth, diminutive ears, and a long, ringed neck. The head is strikingly studded with numerous, indigenously-made brass tacks; furthermore, a cavity on the skull suggests that a horn was at one point likely placed there. A belt of animal skin filled with medicinal substances is wrapped around the chest, while two strands of colored beads are tied across the torso. Three bells, themselves affixed to the strings of beads, dangle below the&nbsp;<em>nkisi&nbsp;</em>figure. An animal skin loincloth covers the bottom half of the figure. In addition to kaolin, the&nbsp;<em>nkisi</em>&rsquo;s surface bears a crusty patina, evidence that it was the recipient of consecrational and votive libatio
Songye;Kalebwe (Songye)
nkisi
1845 – 1855
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.228
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