104 UMMA Objects
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Goldweight in the shape of a square, with a geometric pattern, consisting of variously sized triangles in the center and edged teeth along two edges.
Akan (Akan (culture or style))
Goldweight with geometric pattern
1900 – 1985
Gift of Dr. James and Vivian Curtis
1997/1.479
Panel consisting of repetitive interlocking diamond patterns with "x" shaped designs. 
Kuba (Kuba (Democratic Republic of Congo style))
Raffia Textile Panel
1920 – 1940
Museum Purchase made possible by the Friends of the Museum of Art
1984/2.80
Brown panel with hemmed edges consisting of repetitive diamond pattern with tan and brown lines. The bottom right portion of the panel is frayed. 
Kuba (Kuba (Democratic Republic of Congo style))
Raffia Textile Panel
1895 – 1905
Gift of Mr. David Bernstein
1984/2.75
Rectangular panel with hemmed edges. There are two rows of patterns running down the panel consisting of multiple interlocking lines.
Kuba (Kuba (Democratic Republic of Congo style))
Raffia Textile Panel
1945 – 1955
Museum purchase made possible by the Alfred E. Pernt Memorial Fund in honor of Doctor of Technical Sciences Max H. J. Pernt and his wife Anna Pernt (née Mueller)
1986/2.106
Square panel with  hemmed edges divided into four sections. The upper left section consists of opposing chevrons, while the lower left section consist of "x" styled patterns. The upper right section consist of diamonds formed by lines folding onto themselves while the lower right section consists of a grid of light tan diamond patterns. 
Kuba (Kuba (Democratic Republic of Congo style))
Raffia Textile Panel
1950 – 1980
Gift of Phyllis and Sheldon Ross, Birmingham, Michigan
1994/1.82
Square panel with hemmed edge divided into four quadrants. The upper left quadrant consists of opposing chevrons and diamond patterns and the lower left quadrant consists of diamond patterns with squared edges. The upper right quadrant consists of interlocking diamond patterns while the lower right quadrant consists of brown square and block patterns.  
Kuba (Kuba (Democratic Republic of Congo style))
Raffia Textile Panel
1800 – 1999
Gift of the Robbins Center for Cross Cultural Communications in memory of Warren M. Robbins
2014/2.82
Rectangular panel with hemmed edges consisting of linear dark brown and tan interlocking diamonds.
Kuba (Kuba (Democratic Republic of Congo style))
Raffia Textile Panel
1895 – 1905
Gift of Mr. David Bernstein
1984/2.74
This print shows a black horizontal rectangle in the lower left portion of an off-white background. The rectangle is divided in half and each side has a pattern of stripes that create the appearance of inverted u-shaped forms stacked one on top of the other. <br />
Frank Stella (American (North American))
Marriage of Reason and Squalor
1967
Gift of Dr. Seymour and Barbara K. Adelson
2010/2.25
Rectangular pattern with hemmed edges. Panel consists of multiple diamond and rectilinear patterns formed by intersecting lines and chevrons. 
Kuba (Kuba (Democratic Republic of Congo style))
Raffia Textile Panel
1950 – 1980
Gift of Phyllis and Sheldon Ross, Birmingham, Michigan
1994/1.83
Square panel with cream color fringed edges. The design consists of black and yellow interlocking lines that form a diamond pattern, in addition to intersecting cream bands with burnt sienna colored lines that form X-shaped patterns throughout the panel.
Kuba (Kuba (Democratic Republic of Congo style))
Raffia Textile Panel
1970 – 1980
Gift of Stefan S. and Ruth S. Fajans
1985/1.155
Square panel with intersecting lines that form a diamond pattern with checkered squares in between the intersected lines. 
Kuba (Kuba (Democratic Republic of Congo style))
Raffia Textile Panel
1945 – 1955
Gift of the Honorable Jack Faxon
1991/2.37
Rectangled panel with hemmed edge consisting of two squared and two rounded edges. There are tan and brown trangular patterns partially covering the panel consisting of uneven chevrons and interlocking rectiliniar designs.
Kuba (Kuba (Democratic Republic of Congo style))
Raffia Textile Panel
1800 – 1999
Gift of the Robbins Center for Cross Cultural Communications in memory of Warren M. Robbins
2014/2.83
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