27 UMMA Objects
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Chinese ink painting on scroll with poem, ducks and flowers.
Wang Mengbai
Pair of Mandarin Ducks (Scroll)
1915 – 1925
Gift of Sharlynn and Andrew Circo, in memory of Sotokichi Katsuizumi
2011/2.188
Chinese ink painting on a fan with drawings on the front and a poem on the back.
Wang Mengbai
Pair of Mandarin Ducks (Fan)
1915 – 1925
Gift of Sharlynn and Andrew Circo, in memory of Sotokichi Katsuizumi
2011/2.189
There are three ducks in the water. The first is facing forward and is sitting in the water with its feet completely submerged. The second is behind the first but is a little higher in the water and is pecking at its feathers. The third is the furthest behind and is standing in the water with its legs fully visible but its feet submerged, it is also pecking at its feathers. There are two signatures and two seals on the right side of the painting.
Nishiyama Kan'ei
Ducks
1884
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1990/1.198
A small earthenware figure of a duck standing on two feet with head curved down, covered in a straw-colored glaze.
Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Duck
600 – 632
Gift of Willard A. and Marybelle Bouchard Hanna
1991/2.17
In this monumental scroll, Nukina Kaioku has brushed a Chinese poem of his own composition, on the enduring theme of nature as refreshment for the spirit.  Note his masterful variation of thick and thin strokes, wet and dry ink, stately and rapid movement.<br />The verses may be tentatively rendered into English as follows:<br />   Mandarin ducks enjoy the fresh water; their graceful forms glow as they pass through channels in the reeds.<br />   Pushing beyond the thickets [to the open pond], they call to one another again and again in the dawn.<br />   A crimson mist breaks through gaps in the glade, its glow warming hidden nests.<br />   Waking up with nothing to do, [I came here] to playfully row among the spring waves.
Nukina Kaioku
Calligraphy: Watching Ducks on a Spring Morning
1840 – 1863
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1987/2.45
A stoneware vessel designed for pouring or possibly to serve as an oil lamp, in the shape of a duck. The lower half of the duck&#39;s body and &quot;legs&quot; are formed by a shallow bowl on an openwork pedestal; the sides of the bowl have been compressed to make an elongated shape. The upper half of the duck&#39;s body, and its neck and head are formed by hand, The duck&#39;s body is hollow, with two aperture: liquids can be poured in through a funnel with a cup-shaped mouth on the duck&#39;s back, and liquids can be poured out through a wide opening at the tail.<br />
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This is a gray or gray-orange, duck-shaped, low-fired earthenware vessel. Its semi-globular spout is attached to the upper part of the duck&rsquo;s back, while a 2.8cm wide hole, which appears to have been used for pouring liquids, is located at the tail end. The duck&rsquo;s beak is flat and wide, and its eyes are expressed by an incised dot and circle. The lower part of the body features three ridges that form a wave design. The pe
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Vessel in the shape of a duck
200 – 399
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.188
A porcelain large bowl with gently curved interior and straight flaring rim, on a foot ring with kiln grit residue.  It is painted with underglaze cobalt blue to depict a duck in a landscape in the central image surrounded by a border of six groupings of plants, and around the rim eight foliate-shaped reserves frame a floral spray against a patterned ground.  It is covered in a clear glaze with fine crackle.
Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Bowl
1580 – 1650
Gift of the William T. and Dora G. Hunter Collection
2002/2.8
2003/1.405.1-4 comprises two sets of four panels of fusuma-e (sliding doors) still in their original frames, with the metal door pulls set into each of the paintings. One side, across all four panels, depicts mandarin ducks and plum trees, by Yokoyama Seiki (1793&ndash;1865); and on the reverse is a river landscape by Seiki&#39;s pupil, Okajima Seik&ocirc; (1828&ndash;1877).
Yokoyama Seiki and Okajima Seikō;Okajima Seikō
A side: Mandarin ducks and plum trees, by Yokoyama SeikiB side: Lakeside landscape, by Okajima Seikô
1850 – 1865
Gift of Helmut Stern
2003/1.405.4
2003/1.405.1-4 comprises two sets of four panels of fusuma-e (sliding doors) still in their original frames, with the metal door pulls set into each of the paintings. One side, across all four panels, depicts mandarin ducks and plum trees, by Yokoyama Seiki (1793&ndash;1865); and on the reverse is a river landscape by Seiki&#39;s pupil, Okajima Seik&ocirc; (1828&ndash;1877).
Yokoyama Seiki and Okajima Seikō;Okajima Seikō
A side: Mandarin ducks and plum trees, by Yokoyama SeikiB side: Lakeside landscape, by Okajima Seikô
1850 – 1865
Gift of Helmut Stern
2003/1.405.3
This six-fold screen, a half of a pair, is meant to represent six of the twelve months of the year, with keen attention paid to the birds and flowers associated with each. Although this screen bears Kano Tan&rsquo;yu&rsquo;s signature, it was probably created by his studio or by followers working in this famous artist&rsquo;s style.
One of a pair of six-fold screens
19th century
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1965/1.178
These panels represent six of the twelve months. The panels each have calligraphy and a red seal in one corner. In each panel there is a bird and a type of plant, which are suggestive of particular months. On the top left panel there is bamboo, the bow of the boat with a small lamp attached to it, and a type of water fowl. In the bottom middle panel is a blooming sakura tree and a pheasant. In the bottom left panel is blue and white wisteria ans small sparrows. In the bottom right panel there is a willow slowly coming back to life after winter over a thatched building.
One of a pair of six-fold screens
19th century
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1965/1.179
An ivory snuff bottle with design of green and yellow peonies and mandarin ducks. On the top of the snuff bottle is a mouthpiece with a blue stopper. The snuff bottle is sitting on a decorated wooden stand.
Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Ivory snuff bottle with design of peonies and mandarin ducks
1875 – 1925
Gift of Mr. Robert W. Coggan
1980/2.77
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