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Results for terms:ceramic ware (visual works)

125 UMMA Objects (page 1/11)
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This large jar is wider in the top portion, narrowing towards the base. It has a short neck that flares outwards. The natural glaze creates a range of browns and grays.
Kôyama Kiyoko
Large Jar
1995 – 2005
Gift of the artist
2010/1.213
Burial wares are those placed in tombs as a way of praying for the continued happiness and comfort of the deceased in the afterlife. Offering vessels produced in the Joseon period included smaller reproductions of the vessels used every day, such as jars, boxes, and bowls, among others. The University of Michigan Museum of Art houses a set of white porcelain offering vessels buried in pit graves between the late 16th century and early 17th century. The vessels are coated in pale blue glaze but generally tinged with gray. They were fired without using saggers, while resting on fine sand supports. Their glaze is relatively well applied and fused. The cintamani-shaped knobs on the lids are similar to those found on the lids of vessels produced at white porcelain kilns near Seondong-ri and Songjeong-ri in Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do in the 17th century.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.188]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Burial Set (15 plates, 16 bowls and 6 lids)
17th century
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.79.5
Burial wares are those placed in tombs as a way of praying for the continued happiness and comfort of the deceased in the afterlife. Offering vessels produced in the Joseon period included smaller reproductions of the vessels used every day, such as jars, boxes, and bowls, among others. The University of Michigan Museum of Art houses a set of white porcelain offering vessels buried in pit graves between the late 16th century and early 17th century. The vessels are coated in pale blue glaze but generally tinged with gray. They were fired without using saggers, while resting on fine sand supports. Their glaze is relatively well applied and fused. The cintamani-shaped knobs on the lids are similar to those found on the lids of vessels produced at white porcelain kilns near Seondong-ri and Songjeong-ri in Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do in the 17th century.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.186]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Burial Set (15 plates, 16 bowls and 6 lids)
17th century
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.79.2
Burial wares are those placed in tombs as a way of praying for the continued happiness and comfort of the deceased in the afterlife. Offering vessels produced in the Joseon period included smaller reproductions of the vessels used every day, such as jars, boxes, and bowls, among others. The University of Michigan Museum of Art houses a set of white porcelain offering vessels buried in pit graves between the late 16th century and early 17th century. The vessels are coated in pale blue glaze but generally tinged with gray. They were fired without using saggers, while resting on fine sand supports. Their glaze is relatively well applied and fused. The cintamani-shaped knobs on the lids are similar to those found on the lids of vessels produced at white porcelain kilns near Seondong-ri and Songjeong-ri in Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do in the 17th century.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.187]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Burial Set (15 plates, 16 bowls and 6 lids)
17th century
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.79.4
Medium-sized Satsuma ware jar. The body of the jar is brown while the upper portion around the mouth is a rich blue glaze.
Japanese (Japanese (culture or style))
Satsuma Ware Jar
1650
Gift of Whitmore Gray, wedding gift from Charles Freer to JS and Harriet Gray
2013/2.1
The form of this bottle is unusual in that its body and neck are almost the same length. The glaze is partially oxidized, producing an orange tint, while the surface shows contamination by impurities and pinholes, and cracks are formed towards the foot. The bottle is glossy overall, but the glaze was unevenly applied and has run in some parts. The clay has a high kaolin content, and the bottle has thin, light walls. White porcelain of this kind was produced in Yanggu-gun, Gangwon-do, and Cheongsong-gun, Gyeongsangbuk-do.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.206]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Buncheong ware bottle with globular body and funnel-shaped neck
1900 – 1950
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.295
Asymmetrical vase with red, black, green, splotches of design on off-white glazed ground.
Kawai Kanjirô
Vase
1960 – 1963
Museum Purchase
1963/2.70
Tea bowl with natural ash glaze, which creates gray, black, white, and orage tones on the piece, speckled with black.
Kôyama Kiyoko
Tea Bowl
1995 – 2005
Gift of the artist
2010/1.215
An earthenware sancai three-color glazed figure of a man wearing a long green robe and tall black hat. He is carrying an amber-glazed rectangular box over the top of an amber-glazed tasseled sash that covers his hands, and is standing on a green- and amber-glazed octagonal dais. His face is painted in polychrome mineral pigments, and his head was sculpted separately from the body.
Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Male Attendant
1368 – 1644
Gift of Jiu-Hwa Lo Upshur
2009/2.105A&B
Large bowl with wide and asymmetrical rim and natural ash glaze. The bowl appears to be orange on the outside, and multi-colored on the inside.
Okuda Eizan
Large Bowl (raibachi)
2005
Gift of the artist
2010/1.209
Yuan water bottle from china, 13-14th four loop handles, non-Korean, frequently seen on Yuan shipwrecks 13-14th century, made in Southeast china<br />
(visiting Korean curators from Ehwa University, notes by Min Li 7/07)
<p>This is a brownish-balck glazed jar, produced in the 13th century of Yuan, China. Many of these jars were unearthed in the areas of Gangwha-do Island and Gyeonggi-do. It is still commonly rederred to as &ldquo;Mongolian jars.&rdquo; The entire surface, with the exception of part of the mouth, is coated in brownish-black glaze. Four loop-type lugs are attached to its shoulder. The large amount of sand mixed into the clay produced a rough texture. The flat base of the jar is cracked.</p>
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.142]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Small storage jar with wide mouth and four small 'ears'
13th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.209
This incense burner is composed of two equal halves. It opens to be used for incense storage, and takes the shape of a ginko leaf. The glaze gives the piece a red color.
Kôyama Kiyoko
Incense Container in the Shape of a Ginko Leaf
1995 – 2005
Gift of the artist
2010/1.216
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