Advanced Search

K-12 Educator
K-12 Student
Museum Visitor
UMMA Docent
UMMA Staff
University Faculty
University Student
Between and Mortarboard


UMMA Object Specific Fields






Query builder

Results for terms:Vajrayana

13 UMMA Objects (page 1/2)
Results Per Page Sort by

A woodblock print on paper; the block was quite worn when the print was made, resulting in an impression of poor quality.
Tibetan (Tibetan (culture or style))
Padmasambhava in Yabyum (Divine Union)
20th century
Museum purchase, Acquisition Fund
1973/1.808B

Tibetan (Tibetan (culture or style))
An imaginary portrait of the Tibetan monk and scholar Go Lotsawa (1392–1481)
1700 – 1899
Museum purchase for the Paul Leroy Grigaut Memorial Collection
1972/2.347
A 'mani' or prayer wheel, a common ritual object used in Tibetan Buddhism: a device made a handle (here a simple wooden stick) supporting a hollow cylindrical drum on a spindle. A small metal weight, attached to one one side of the drum with a cord, allows the wheel to spin with a slight rotation of the wrist. The drum in his case is of hammered metal, with incised patterns of Buddhist auspicious symbols.
Tibetan (Tibetan (culture or style))
Prayer Wheel (Mani Wheel)
1833 – 1932
Gift of the Estate of Maxine W. Kunstadter in memory of Sigmund Kunstadter, Class of 1922
1983/1.423
An example of a 'mani' or prayer wheel, a common ritual object used in Tibetan Buddhism: a device made a handle (here a wooden stick, with simple incised line designs) supporting a hollow cylindrical drum on a spindle. Here the drum is elaboratedly decorated with rows of inset turquoise stones, as well as a row of Sanskit letters in bone.  A small weight of bone attached to one one side of the drum with a metal chain, allows the wheel to spin with a slight rotation of the wrist.
Tibetan (Tibetan (culture or style))
Prayer Wheel (Mani Wheel)
1833 – 1932
Gift of the Estate of Maxine W. Kunstadter in memory of Sigmund Kunstadter, Class of 1922
1983/1.424
An illustration of the bodhisattva Jokaishō, the divine figure is seated on a lotus blossom venerating a reliquary. The figure sits cross-legged on a red lotus blossom, while beneath the figure is a blue sutra box on a green and yellow lotus. The image is depicted with largely even "iron-wire" lines typical of Heian period Buddhist painting. 
Takuma Tametō
Bodhisattva (Jokaisho Bosatsu): esoteric Buddhist iconographic drawing
1133 – 1166
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1963/1.99
A suberply cast hollow bronze figure of Tara, a Buddhist goddess, shown leated in the lalitasana pose ("royal ease," with one knee bent and the other relaxed), her right hand extended to her right knee in vara mudra (the gesture of charity), and her left hand in vitarka mudra (the gesture of teaching, with the thumb and third finger brought together). She wears a dhoti and jewelry, including an elaborate tiara and enormous lotus-petal design ear plugs. Her face has a broad, open forehead, with wide, slightly arching brows; her eyes are downcast with "s"-shaped upper lids; her nose is straight and long, and her mouth, in a curved Cupid's bow shape, is small but full. Her torso leans slightly to her left, which is balanced by the right tilt of her head. She sits on a double lotus dais with beaded upper and lower rims. The image and the base were case in one piece in the lost-wax method.  There are traces of red paint for her mouth and blue paint for her hair.
Bodhisattva Tara (Tibetan, Jetsun Dolma)
18th century
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1972/2.40
A painting in ink, gouache, and gold pigment on cotton, with considerable damage.
Teacher and adept in a garden, with a yab-yum figure
1700 – 1899
Bequest of Margaret Watson Parker
1955/1.94
A small stone sculpture in bas-relief, depicting a tantric goddess. The back of the image is carved in a stylized petal shape, while the figure is crudely carved in relief on the front.
Nepali
Dakini
19th century
Gift of Mr. & Mrs. Yale Ginsburg
1983/1.111
A bas-relief carving made of bone and in the shape of a lotus petal, depicting a wrathful guardian of the Tibetan Buddhist faith. At the base of the "petal" are the tops of mountains, with the waves of the sea visible between them; in the rounded part of the "petal,"  a border of flames encircles a dynamic image of the bodhisattva Vajrapani in his wrathful form. The background behind Vajrapani is incised with closely spaced wavy lines, again suggesting flames.
Guru Dragpo Votive Plaque, in the shape of a lotus petal
18th century
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1985/2.49
A bas-relief carving made of bone and in the shape of a lotus petal, depicting Pehar, a guardian of the Tibetan Buddhist faith, in wrathful form. At the base of the "petal" are the tops of mountains, with the waves of the sea visible between them; in the rounded part of the "petal,"  a border of flames encircles a dynamic image of Pehar, his garments flowing in the wind as he rides on a snow lion. The background behind Pehar is incised with closely spaced wavy lines, again suggesting flames.
Dorje Legpa Votive Plaque
18th century
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1985/2.50

Japanese (Japanese (culture or style))
Bodhisattva Amoghapasa (Japanese, Fûkûkenjaku Kannon)(Avalokitesvara of the never-empty noose)
1945 – 1955
Gift of Mrs. Caroline J. Plumer
1991/1.76

Nepali
Bodhisattva Mañjusri
18th century
Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Leo S. Figiel and Dr. and Mrs. Steven J. Figiel
1980/2.278
1 2
Loading…