29 UMMA Objects
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A miniature stupa, cast of bronze in several parts, consisting of a bell-shaped base; an inverted cone-shaped tower, capped by an "umbrella" with pendant, fringe-like decoration, inlaid with semi-percious stone, surmounted by a lotus bud. Atop the whole structure is a half-moon and sun disk motif, supported by intertwined ribbons and culminating in another lotus bud.
Kadampa Stupa
13th century
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
2003/1.386

Indonesian
Four-Armed Esoteric Deity, probably Avalokitesvara
10th century
Gift of Mark and Iuliana Phillips
2005/2.77

Indonesian
Vairocana Buddha, Seated in the Mudra of the Union of Six Elements
10th century
Gift of Mark and Iuliana Phillips
2005/2.78
A 'mani' or prayer wheel, a common ritual object used in Tibetan Buddhism: a device made a handle (here a simple wooden stick) supporting a hollow cylindrical drum on a spindle. A small metal weight, attached to one one side of the drum with a cord, allows the wheel to spin with a slight rotation of the wrist. The drum in his case is of hammered metal, with incised patterns of Buddhist auspicious symbols.
Tibetan (Tibetan (culture or style))
Prayer Wheel (Mani Wheel)
1833 – 1932
Gift of the Estate of Maxine W. Kunstadter in memory of Sigmund Kunstadter, Class of 1922
1983/1.423
An example of a 'mani' or prayer wheel, a common ritual object used in Tibetan Buddhism: a device made a handle (here a wooden stick, with simple incised line designs) supporting a hollow cylindrical drum on a spindle. Here the drum is elaboratedly decorated with rows of inset turquoise stones, as well as a row of Sanskit letters in bone.  A small weight of bone attached to one one side of the drum with a metal chain, allows the wheel to spin with a slight rotation of the wrist.
Tibetan (Tibetan (culture or style))
Prayer Wheel (Mani Wheel)
1833 – 1932
Gift of the Estate of Maxine W. Kunstadter in memory of Sigmund Kunstadter, Class of 1922
1983/1.424
A miniature sculpture of a the Tibetan yogin Milarepa as a rotund figure, seated in lalitasana (the posture of royal ease, with one knee drawn up and the other relaxed) on an antelope skin (the head of the antelope can be discerned just under the figure's left foot, as an incised design). The right hand is raised, cusping the right ear as though to better hear, while the left elbow rests on the left knee, and the right hand holds a nettle-shell bowl. Wrapped around his torso, from his right shoulder to his left knee, is a sash (sometimes referred to as a meditation belt), which allows him to keep his body upright during long hours of meditation. The base, cast in a single piece with the figure, is decorated with beading and a single band of lotus petals.
Yogi Milarepa (c. 1032–c. 1135)
Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Leo S. Figiel and Dr. and Mrs. Steven J. Figiel
1981/2.56
A bas-relief carving made of bone and in the shape of a lotus petal, depicting Pehar, a guardian of the Tibetan Buddhist faith, in wrathful form. At the base of the "petal" are the tops of mountains, with the waves of the sea visible between them; in the rounded part of the "petal,"  a border of flames encircles a dynamic image of Pehar, his garments flowing in the wind as he rides on a snow lion. The background behind Pehar is incised with closely spaced wavy lines, again suggesting flames.
Dorje Legpa Votive Plaque
18th century
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1985/2.50

Japanese (Japanese (culture or style))
Bodhisattva Amoghapasa (Japanese, Fûkûkenjaku Kannon)(Avalokitesvara of the never-empty noose)
1945 – 1955
Gift of Mrs. Caroline J. Plumer
1991/1.76
Mañjusri, the Bodhisattva of Wisdom, standing with two celestial attendants.  This representation of Manjushri includes six arms, one of which holds a sword, while a narrow book (modeled after books made from palm leaves) lays across his upper hand.  Manjushri is wearing an ornamented crown and necklace, and is encircled by a halo of flames.
Indian (Indian (South Asian))
Six-armed Bodhisattva Mañjusri, standing, with two celestial attendants
17th century
Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Leo S. Figiel and Dr. and Mrs. Steven J. Figiel
1978/2.109
A portable painting in mineral pigments and gold on a primed cotton ground; the painting is designed to be rolled up when not in use. The painting was folded at some time in its history, resulting in a loss of pigment along two vertical lines.
Pehar Gyalpo
Gift of Mrs. Caroline I. Plumer for the James Marshall Plumer Collection
1980/2.211
A fragment of a horizontal scroll, which would originally have been rolled up and tucked inside a Tibetan prayer wheel, with the text of a prayer printed in red and black ink.
Tibetan (Tibetan (culture or style))
Prayer scroll fragment, from a prayer wheel
18th century
Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Milton B. Freudenheim in memory of Otto F. Ege
1987/1.195.13

Japanese (Japanese (culture or style))
Crown for Vairocana Buddha (J. Dainichi Nyorai)
17th century
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
2003/2.59.2
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