28 UMMA Objects
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This dish contains incised floral decoration and was made with white slip with purple and turquoise underglaze, and finally glazed in a very light transparent blue. The bowl has been glued together in three pieces around the rim, with restoration also evident around the rim. 
Iranian (Iranian)
Shallow bowl with bands of turquoise glaze and central floral pattern
17th century
Transfer from the College of Architecture and Design
1972/2.159
This glazed plate is attributed to the Safavid period in Iran. The interior decoration consists of yellow splashes on a glossy red-brown glaze. 
Iranian (Iranian)
Plate with deep red-brown glaze spashed with yellow (cracked)
1600 – 1899
Museum Purchase
1957/1.98
This star-shaped ceramic tile is decorated with floral patterns and shapes. This kind of tile seems to be very popular in the 15th and 16th centuries of the Iranian Islamic world. The relief decoration is moulded and unglazed while the ground is glazed in blues with black underglaze and covered with a clear overglaze. 
Iranian (Iranian)
Star-shaped tile with molded floral design
1400 – 1599
Transfer from the College of Architecture and Design
1972/2.135
The unglazed ewer consists of two parts: a bulbous body with narrow, well-defined foot ring and short columnar neck; and a spout joined in the form of an anmial's head. A handle extends from the base of the head to the shoulder of the body. Around the upper part of the body runs an Arabic verse in Naskhi script. The moulded relief inscription is set against a background of floral scrolls. The meter is Tawil: (translated) Behold, poverty hopes for wealth, while wealth fears poverty." The verse appears in the 'Iqd al-Farid, compiled by Ibn 'Abd Rabbihi, who attributes it to 'Ali. The column above the body narrows to form a shoulder, on which the head has been set. The head is a cone, the narrow end of which serves as the animal's nose and has a small hole for pouring out the contents of the ewer. Over the base of the cone jut two pointed ears. Two loops are fastened below them to the shoulder of the neck. Small discs, serving as eyes, have been applied in the front of the ears. The hole for insertion of the liq
Iranian (Iranian)
Squat bottle with everted rim
17th century
Museum Purchase
1957/1.90
This Qajar dish features three separate compartments and highly decorated exterior panels. Each side of the dish is decorated with a pair of young female faces that alternate with abstract deep blue designs. The interor panels lack decoration aside from the bases of each compartment which contain blue painted floral sprays. The craftmanship of the dish finds roots in the Kashan tradition of the 12th and 13th centuries, making it a testament to the continuation of traditional techniques in the region by the 19th century. 
Iranian (Iranian)
Shallow open box with three compartments, adorned with women's faces
19th century
Museum Purchase
1957/1.99
This vase is in the baluster shape and has a fine turquoise blue crackled glaze. It has been broken in many pieces and restored. The composition of the body is in line with typical pottery techniques found in major centers of the Iranian Islamic world which utilized a frit body covered with glaze. 
Iranian (Iranian)
Vase
1500 – 1699
Transfer from the College of Architecture and Design
1972/2.128
This Mina'i ware bowl fragment displays well preserved base decorations. Five figures, two birds, a tree and a rim of Kufic insciptions float on the interior, while the exterior exhibits alternating red and cobalt symbols. The bowl is made with a pink-tan paste and a glossy all-over glaze. Ivory, red, cobalt, turquoise, black, pink and brown paints are used to create vibrant imagery.
Iranian (Iranian)
Mina'i ware bowl fragment with figures
1167 – 1232
Museum purchase
1957/1.67
This deep footed bowl comes from the 17th century Safavid period in Iran. The bowl features an ivory ground with a glossy glaze and blue and black underglaze painting. Cobalt blue floral rug designs cover the exterior of the bowl and  a cobalt blue medallion is found on the interior base.
Iranian (Iranian)
Deep bowl with medallion design
17th century
Museum purchase
1957/1.92
This large Iranian plate sits on a small base. The decoration consists of a bird and crude space fillers. The units are outlined in green and incised, in addition to green glazed parts that are not incised. The design is cut through the slip and appears light brown while the exterior is left unglazed and plain red-brown.The plate is mended and appears to have commercial mosaic in parts. The colors are green, light green, yellow, and red-brown. Painted green and brown spots and stripes are combined with scribbled engraving to form often asymmetrical designs.
Iranian (Iranian)
Shallow bowl with schematized animal motif
1100 – 1299
Museum Purchase
1957/1.54
This Kashan style bowl comes from the Seljuk period in Iran. The bowl features a simplified  design of thin cobalt blue stripes that radiate from the interior foot to the rim. The overall bowl is done on a tan ground with a slightly green coloring. The bowl is either late 12th or early 13th century Seljuk pottery.<br />
 
Iranian (Iranian)
Conical Bowl with simple blue stripe design
12th century
Museum purchase
1957/1.64
This Kashan style bowl from the Seljuk period in Iran features eight brown interior bands. The cobalt blue bands have white inscriptions in Naskhi-style calligraphy radiating from the center to the lip of the bowl. The exterior contains delicate floral stalk decorations. The presence of excrescences on the interior may determine that this bowl was used for waste.<br />
 
Iranian (Iranian)
Bowl with calligraphic inscriptions and floral designs
13th century
Museum purchase
1957/1.57
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