28 UMMA Objects
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'Ueberlauf' on rim running design, in center a blossom; paste: buff, fine, medium-hard; glaze: glossy, fine crackle top glaze, over cream slip on interior and exterior except bottom part. Fired upside down (tripod on interior) and upright. Colors are green, yellow, aubergine, green-white. Slightly restored.
Iranian (Iranian)
Plate with tri-colored glaze
10th century
Museum Purchase
1957/1.51
"Produced in the Wan Li era (1573-1619), the Chinese prototypes are more tightly controlled and more elaborate that the museum's Persian version. In place of nine rim panels in the Far Eastern piece our bowl has four, more widely dispersed over the rim area and enclosing loosely executed foliate forms. The elaborate scene usually appearing in the center of such bowls here is reduced to a simple bouqet, now in part reconstruction." 
Iranian (Iranian)
Plate with radial design
Museum Purchase
1957/1.84
This bowl was modeled on a Chinese vessel of the late 16th century. Below the foliate rim there are six panels with horses in reseve against a background of waves and clouds. Following the system used on Chinese vessels the horses facing different directions are placed in alternation around the bowl. Small tassels hang from the center of each panel, but otherwise the middle zone of the exterior is free of decoration. Overlapping petals are found just above the foot. The internal decoration consists of a floral spray in the foot and eight half-medallions on the rim separated by eight tassels hanging from the rim. <br /><br />
 
Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Bowl with foliate Rim
17th century
Museum Purchase
1957/1.89
This deep footed bowl comes from the 17th century Safavid period in Iran. The bowl features an ivory ground with a glossy glaze and blue and black underglaze painting. Cobalt blue floral rug designs cover the exterior of the bowl and  a cobalt blue medallion is found on the interior base.
Iranian (Iranian)
Deep bowl with medallion design
17th century
Museum purchase
1957/1.92
This glazed plate is attributed to the Safavid period in Iran. The interior decoration consists of yellow splashes on a glossy red-brown glaze. 
Iranian (Iranian)
Plate with deep red-brown glaze spashed with yellow (cracked)
1600 – 1899
Museum Purchase
1957/1.98
This Qajar dish features three separate compartments and highly decorated exterior panels. Each side of the dish is decorated with a pair of young female faces that alternate with abstract deep blue designs. The interor panels lack decoration aside from the bases of each compartment which contain blue painted floral sprays. The craftmanship of the dish finds roots in the Kashan tradition of the 12th and 13th centuries, making it a testament to the continuation of traditional techniques in the region by the 19th century. 
Iranian (Iranian)
Shallow open box with three compartments, adorned with women's faces
19th century
Museum Purchase
1957/1.99
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The unglazed jug has a bulbous body with a narrow neck which is half the height of the body. A slight bulging occurs midway up the neck. A handle is joined to the neck below the lip and extends to the shoulder of the body. <br /><br />
A <em>Naskhi</em> Arabic inscription, worked in barbotine technique against a background of unordered small bosses and open circles, runs around the upper part of the body. <br />
 
Iranian (Iranian)
Jug, narrow neck, single handle, band of decorative inscriptions at shoulder
900 – 1199
Museum Purchase
1959/1.91
The vibrant coloring of this deep bowl consists dark brown, muddy brown, yellow-green and ivory. The design is organized around an inscription which appears above the base far down on the side. Above the inscription running horizontally is a separate enclosed design which looks like arcaded doorways with a string with a ball on it cutting each arcade in half for a total of seven. Opposite this is a series of four and one-half arcades in a vertical direction. Between these two areas there is a design repeated on opposite sides of the bowl with floral circular motifs on each side of a large, abstracted pear-shape form. The circles are brown and yellow-green and the pear form is orange and brown. Beneath each circle is a 'base' narrowing towards the center and directing the eye to the base. The base is covered with a shield-like design of orange and brown. The ivory background is not filled in but certain lines have been incised to add greater interest.  <br />
 
Iranian (Iranian)
Deep bowl with vegetal and calligraphic designs
10th century
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1961/1.185
This star-shaped ceramic tile is decorated with floral patterns and shapes. This kind of tile seems to be very popular in the 15th and 16th centuries of the Iranian Islamic world. The relief decoration is moulded and unglazed while the ground is glazed in blues with black underglaze and covered with a clear overglaze. 
Iranian (Iranian)
Star-shaped tile with molded floral design
1400 – 1599
Transfer from the College of Architecture and Design
1972/2.135
A blue and white platter. White porcellanous body with painting in blue under a clear glaze slightly tinged with blue-green.
Ali ibn al-Hajj Muhammad
Platter with an inscription from a Hadith [a saying of the Prophet Muhammad], signed by Ali ibn al-Hajj Muhammad
1600 – 1799
Transfer from the College of Architecture and Design
1972/2.158
The dish belongs to a large group of sgraffiato wares, examples of which have been found from Afghanistan to northwest Iran. They are characterized by an incised design cut into a slip and enhanced with glazes of different colors, frequently yellow and green. In this particular case, and others like it, the concentric scratched lines are clearly determined by compass while the filler patterns are somewhat less controlled. The pigment is not applied to coincide with the engraved line but rather forms an independant web of color over it.<br />
 
Seljuk (Seljuk)
Plate
1000 – 1199
Museum Purchase
1957/1.52
This Kashan style bowl from the Seljuk period in Iran features eight brown interior bands. The cobalt blue bands have white inscriptions in Naskhi-style calligraphy radiating from the center to the lip of the bowl. The exterior contains delicate floral stalk decorations. The presence of excrescences on the interior may determine that this bowl was used for waste.<br />
 
Iranian (Iranian)
Bowl with calligraphic inscriptions and floral designs
13th century
Museum purchase
1957/1.57
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