Results for On display?:on; Current location:UMMA Gallery Location ➔ FFW, Mezzanine ➔ M07 (Woon-hyung Lee and Korea Foundation Gallery of Korean Art)

66 UMMA Objects
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Earthenware roof tile-end with molded floral pattern.<br />
The floral medallion on this tile-end consists of bosanghwa(Buddhist floral pattern) motifs which has four heart-shaped petals. The rim is decorated with a chain of beads.<br />
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This dark gray, high-fired earthenware convex eave-end roof tile is decorated with a palmette motif consisting of four petals of a flower in full bloom. Also referred to as the bosanghwa (寶相華, Ch. baoxianghua , a mythical flower often used as a Buddhist decorative motif ), this motif is arranged around a central ovary. Traces of trimming and smoothing with water are visible on the sides of the tile. Traces of clay used to attach this tile to a flat tile can also be seen on the joints.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 39]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Roof Tile-End with Floral Medallion Design
676 – 935
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.200
Stoneware lotus-shaped cup and stand with celadon glaze. The cup is shaped in the style of a ten-lobed lotus blossom. On each lobe lies lightly incised chrysanthemum decoration. The cup rests on a pedestal in the design of an inverted lotus flower, which rises from the dish-like base of the stand, mounted on a fluted foot.
<p>This is a flower-shaped cup and stand which offers a good demonstration of the formal splendor of 12th century Goryeo celadon despite yellow-borwn coloration in places. Both the cup and stand have ten lobes and they were produced using molds. On each of the ten lotus petals of the cup and stand is incised a chrysanthemum, and another chrysanthemum design is incised on the upper part of the stand where the cup rests. Around the pedestal on where the cup sits is a band of inverted lotus petals. Each foot of the cup and stand has refractory spur marks.<br />
[<em>Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art</em> (2014) p.125]<br />
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Lobed Lotus-Shaped Cup and Stand with incised floral patterns
12th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.235A&B
This is an eight-lobed bronze mirror in a dark green or blackish green hue. It is divided into two registers by eightlobed ridge, first of which is decorated with floral scrolls. The inner register has two cranes encircling the suspension loop in the center with their wings extended and facing each other. This object may be compared to other crane-patterned mirrors excavated from the Geumcheon-dong tomb site in Cheongju-si, Chungcheongbuk-do Province.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017), 241]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Mirror with Lobed Rim
12th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.236
<p>This is a celadon lidded bowl with the top of the lid decorated with a peony spray design inside a hexafoil outline inlaid with black and white slips. The foot was made by removing clay from the underside of the base and retains traces of quartzite spurs in three places. The glaze was slightly darkened on the upper part with faint gloss. The glaze is poorly fused on the base of the body, leaving practically no sheen. The piece is of high value, however, for the glimpse it offers of Goryeo&rsquo;s refined yet splendid inlaid celadon ware, thanks to its decorative design that depicts a peony in full bloom, inlaid with white clay.<br />
[<em>Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art </em>(2014) p.118]<br />
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Cosmetic Box with inlaid peony (?) design: 6-lobed shape to lip top
1167 – 1199
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.240A&B
Stoneware bottle with partial white slip extending up from an incised band near the widest stretch of the body upwards to the lip. Another band is incised just above the former, creating a two-band pattern that is repeated again at the neck. Between these pairs of bands is an abstract design painted in iron-oxide, creating a brown hue against the white slip. The mouth of the bottle is also coated in this reddish-brown hue. The base of the piece is left its natural gray-brown color.<br />
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This is a buncheong bottle produced at a kiln in Hakbong-ri, Gongju-gun, Chungcheongnamdo. The mouth curves inwards slightly, while the body is swollen. The upper part of the body is decorated with scrolls in underglaze iron-brown on a thick coat of white slip, while the neck and the middle of the body feature horizontal lines incised through the slip. The scroll designs illustrate the characteristic brisk brush strokes that were commonly found in the iron-painted buncheong ware of the 16th century, and they are some
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Small wine bottle with painted design
1400 – 1599
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.267
The upper surface of this vessel features a circle with the Chinese character &quot;je (祭: ancestral rite)&quot; rendered inside in cobalt blue pigment. The tray features blemishes, while the rims show traces of use. The foot retains traces of coarse sand supports stuck to it during firing. This type of ritual vessel has been excavated from the upper sediment layers of waste deposits of kilns in front of what is now Bunwon-ri Elementary School in Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do. Such vessels are presumed to have been produced immediately before the Bunwon-ri kiln cloised down and to have been widely supplied to the general public.&nbsp;<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.196]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Blue-and-white Ritual Dish with Inscription "Je (祭)"
19th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.283
A round peach-shaped water dropper. The peach itself is covered in a white glaze and covered in bamboo stalks and leaves. These are embossed onto the peach and stand out even more as the iron brown underglaze comes through strongest on these details. The iron brown underglaze can also be seen along the base of the waterdropper. The hole is at the top of the peach.<br />
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This is a peach-shaped water dropper shaped in a mold, featuring mold-impressed designs of peach leaf and branch on the surface. Its upper part is perforated by two water holes and the body is very light. Parts of the designs in high-relief are thinly glazed and tinged with brown. The foot is low. It was fired on the kiln shelf, which is an indication that it was produced in the early 20th century.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.185]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
White Porcelain Peach-Shaped Water Dropper
20th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.298
A glazed whie and speckled porcelain bottle. The body is round and shperical, with a narrow concave neck and lipped opening.<br />
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These are modern pieces thrown on a semi-manual wheel. Their shoulders are decorated with simple designs in underglaze cobalt blue, which is a result of Japanese influence. The use of clay with a high kaolin content has given the bottles thin walls and a strong sheen. Their shoulders are contaminated with impurities. Objects of this this type were produced in Cheongsong-gun, Gyeongsangbuk-do.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.207]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Bottle
1900 – 1950
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.63
A glazed whie and speckled porcelain bottle. The body is round with a narrow concave neck and lipped opening. Detailed with a blue curved line and bulb shape.<br />
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These are modern pieces thrown on a semi-manual wheel. Their shoulders are decorated with simple designs in underglaze cobalt blue, which is a result of Japanese influence. The use of clay with a high kaolin content has given the bottles thin walls and a strong sheen. Their shoulders are contaminated with impurities. Objects of this this type were produced in Cheongsong-gun, Gyeongsangbuk-do.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.207]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Bottle
1900 – 1950
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.64
Stoneware jar with natural ash glaze, squat body and lid. Along the widest horizontal stretch is a design of incised concentric circles, with another row above consisting of circles comprised of a pattern of impressions marking the edge of each circle. The convex curve of the lid also contains a row of incised concentric circles, before sloping into a concave valley, and rising up again to a small plateau. It is on this landing that a cintamani style knob rests.<br />
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This is a dark blue-gray, high-fired stoneware lidded bowl with a stamped design. The lid features a pearl-shaped knob at its center and gently slopes down from its flat upper part. A row of double circles encircles upper part of the lid, with the circles in irregular positions. The bowl is widest in its upper part, while its flange slopes steeply inwards. Two thinly incised horizontal lines encircle the upper part of the body. Above these is a row of circles made of engraved dots, while between them is a row of double circles encirclin
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Cinerary urn with concentric circles design
600 – 799
Gift of Mrs. Caroline I. Plumer for the James Marshall Plumer Collection
1973/2.34A&B
This mirror features designs of two birds, coupled with floral motifs, positioned symmetrically on the left and right sides. Eight-foiled barbed bronze mirror is general. This type is a modified form of that.<br />
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This blue-green bronze mirror decorated with a double crane design is excellently cast. It is five-lobed, and the registers are also divided by five-lobe shaped ridge. The outer register is decorated with scroll design while the inner register is adorned with a pair of cranes, with wings spread and heads turned right, arranged on either side of the central suspension loop against the honeysuckle scroll background. This object may be compared to other crane-patterned mirrors excavated from the Geumcheondong site tomb in Cheongju, Chungcheongbuk-do Province.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017), 240]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Domed boss surrounded by raised band and dots, field of two phoenixes among flowers and vines, raised border with floral motif and five-lobed edges on both sides.
918 – 1392
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1965/2.61

Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Twelve Zodiac Animals: Horse
1945 – 1980
Transfer from the Department of the History of Art, Slide and Photograph Collection, gift of Mrs. Pilsoon L. Chun
2021/1.128.7
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