Fall 2018 Rotation: Korea

Theme: Fragments

It looks like a rescent, animal&#39;s tooth or fetus. There is a hole and some carved line on the head part.<br />
<br />
This is a comma-shaped bead made from dark green jade. Such crescent moon-shaped beads, referred to as<em> gogok</em>, were used to decorate golden crowns, clothing, and belts. This example, which was attached to other ornaments via the hole in its head, is typical of comma-shaped beads of the Three Kingdoms period. Three parallel lines are incised across the hole, from which four more incised lines radiate upwards.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p.33]
Korean
Comma-shaped Pendant
nephrite
2 13/16 x 1 3/4 in. (7.1 x 4.3 cm)
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
A round metal lock meant to lock a chest. The front of the metal disc is decorated with a line carving of a Korean character surrounded by multiple carved circles and bulb-like motifs. Around the central design is a ring of larger circles.<br />
<br />
Locks such as these nickel ones were used for locking chests or stacked chests. Their keys are missing. The Chinese characters &ldquo;longevity (壽)&rdquo; and &ldquo;bliss (福)&rdquo; are engraved on locks plate 296 (2009/2.88) and plate 297 (2009/2.89), respectively.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017), 247]</p>
<br />
&nbsp;
Korean
Lock for Chest
metal
2 3/16 x 2 3/16 x 11/16 in. (5.4 x 5.4 x 1.6 cm)
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
A round metal lock meant to lock a chest. The front of the metal disc is decorated with a line carving of a Korean character surrounded by multiple carved circles and bulb-like motifs. Around the central design is a ring of larger circles.<br />
<br />
Locks such as these nickel ones were used for locking chests or stacked chests. Their keys are missing. The Chinese characters &ldquo;longevity (壽)&rdquo; and &ldquo;bliss (福)&rdquo; are engraved on locks plate 296 (2009/2.88) and plate 297 (2009/2.89), respectively.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017), 247]</p>
Korean
Lock for Chest
metal
2 3/16 x 2 3/16 x 11/16 in. (5.4 x 5.4 x 1.6 cm)
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
Earthenware roof tile-end with molded floral pattern.<br />
The floral medallion on this tile-end consists of bosanghwa(Buddhist floral pattern) motifs which has four heart-shaped petals. The rim is decorated with a chain of beads.<br />
<br />
This dark gray, high-fired earthenware convex eave-end roof tile is decorated with a palmette motif consisting of four petals of a flower in full bloom. Also referred to as the bosanghwa (寶相華, Ch. baoxianghua , a mythical flower often used as a Buddhist decorative motif ), this motif is arranged around a central ovary. Traces of trimming and smoothing with water are visible on the sides of the tile. Traces of clay used to attach this tile to a flat tile can also be seen on the joints.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 39]</p>
Korean
Roof Tile-End with Floral Medallion Design
earthenware with molded decoration
4 15/16 x 4 15/16 x 1 1/8 in. (12.5 x 12.5 x 2.7 cm)
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
A large rectangular metal bar lock, similar to a u-bar lock fitted with a key made up of two metal strips in the shape of a wedge, meant to use as a lock for a chest.<br />
<br />
Pipe-shaped locks such as this one were used for locking boxes and chests. The body is original, while the shackle has been newly made. The key has been lost.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017), 245]</p>
Korean
Lock for Chest
metal
1 1/8 x 2 1/16 x 5/8 in. (2.8 x 5.1 x 1.5 cm)
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
<p>Carved on both sides, this wooden printing block records Origin of Household Rites (家禮源流,&nbsp;Garyewollyu), a collection of writings on household rites categorized and summarized during the reign of&nbsp;King Hyeonjong (顯宗, r. 1659-1674) of Joseon by a scholar named Yu Gye (兪棨, 1607-1664). This block&nbsp;contains part of Fascicle 4 of the text Origins of Household Rites entitled &ldquo;Going to Welcome the Bride (親迎, chinyeong, Ch. qinying),&rdquo; the procedure in which the groom welcomes the bride at a wedding ceremony.&nbsp;Korea was the first country in the world to use the technique of carving letters on woodblocks and using them&nbsp;for printing. After the invention of metal type in the early Joseon period, woodblock printing was used to&nbsp;publish scriptures, anthologies and family records in Buddhist temples, Confucian academies and households.</p>

<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 290]</p>
Korean
Wood Block for Printing
wood
9 9/16 x 19 1/8 in. (24.2 x 48.5 cm)
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
A large rectangular metal bar lock, similar to a u-bar lock fitted with a long key, meant to use as a lock for a chest.<br />
<br />
This bucket-shaped iron lock was made for a chest with a downward opening door (bandaji ). In contrast to conventional locks shaped like the Korean letter &ldquo;ㄷ,&rdquo; which are designed to have the key inserted at the right-hand end, this one has an unusual structure that requires insertion of the key at the front near the right end of the lock. The key was made by bending one end of a stick; two tips protruding upward were then soldered to the stick near its bend.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017), 245]</p>
Korean
Lock for Chest
metal
2 x 3 3/4 x 7/8 in. (5 x 9.4 x 2.1 cm);5 in. (12.7 cm)
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
A large rectangular brass-colored metal bar lock, similar to a u-bar lock, meant to use as a lock for a chest.<br />
<br />
This pipe-shaped lock is made of nickel. The key has been lost. The protruding part at the left end is decorated with six incised rings/
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017), 246]</p>
Korean
Lock for Chest
metal
1 1/4 x 2 13/16 x 11/16 in. (3.1 x 7.1 x 1.7 cm)
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
A large rectangular rounded metal bar lock, similar to a u-bar lock, meant to use as a lock for a chest.<br />
<br />
Pipe-shaped locks such as these were used for locking boxes and chests. Their keys have been lost. Each of their bodies was made by forging two plates before soldering them together.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017), 246]</p>
Korean
Lock for Chest
metal
1 1/8 x 2 1/16 x 11/16 in. (2.8 x 5.1 x 1.6 cm)
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
An excerpt from the Lotus Sutra (Japanese: Myōhō Renge Kyō), this sutra uses gold pigment on indigo dyed paper.
Korean
Sutra Fragment, Calligraphy in Block Script
gold ink on indigo-dyed paper
12 3/16 in. x 6 1/16 in. ( 31 cm x 15.4 cm )
Gift of Ellen and Richard Laing
A large metal bar lock, similar to a u-bar lock fitted with a long key, meant to use as a lock for a chest.<br />
<br />
The shape and structure of this lock conform to those of the conventional &ldquo;ㄷ&rdquo;-shaped type of lock. However, its round body resembles the shape of a pipe when viewed from the side. This type of lock was most frequently used for locking small chests and boxes. It was made by forging and soldering iron. The tip of the key resembles the letter &ldquo;T&rdquo; in shape, standing at an angle perpendicular to the handle.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017), 245]</p>
Korean
Lock for Chest
metal
2 11/16 x 5 11/16 x 1 7/16 in. (6.8 x 14.3 x 3.6 cm);5/8 x 6 7/16 x 5/8 in. (1.5 x 16.3 x 1.5 cm)
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
This woodblock contains Fascicle 24 of Essentials of the Comprehensive Mirror (通鑑節要, Tonggamjeolyo, Ch. Tongjian Jieyao), recording famous &ldquo;Memorial for Northern Expeditions (出師表, Chulsapyo, Ch. Chushibiao) by Zhuge Liang (諸葛亮, 181-234) presented to his king, Liu Shan (劉禪, 207-271, r. 223-263), before his expedition to conquer Kingdom of Wei (魏, 220-265). Essentials of the Comprehensive Mirror is a compendium of Comprehensive Mirror in Aid of Governance (資治通鑑, Jachitonggam, Ch. Zizhi Tongjian), a chronological history compiled by Sima Guang (司馬光, 1019-1086) of Northern Song (960-1127), edited by Jiang Zhi (江 贄, 12th century) who lived during the reign of Huizong (徽宗, 1082-1135, r. 1100-1125). Jiang&rsquo;s compendium abbreviated a massive volume of 294 fascicles into 50 fascicles. Both Comprehensive Mirror in Aid of Governance and Essentials of Comprehensive Mirror became known by the abbreviated title Comprehensive Mirror (通鑑, Tonggam, Ch. Tongjian). Essentials of Comprehensive Mirror was used as a cor
Korean
Wood Block for Printing
wood
7 13/16 x 16 7/16 in. (19.8 x 41.6 cm)
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam

0 Comments

0 Tags & 0 Keywords

Tags

Rate this Resource

AVG: 0 | Ratings: 0

& Author Notes

All Rights Reserved

Last Updated

January 24, 2018 8:45 a.m.

Report


Reporting Policy