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Hawk

Accession Number
1964/2.62

Title
Hawk

Artist(s)
Japanese

Artist Nationality
Japanese (culture or style)

Object Creation Date
17th century (?)

Medium & Support
hanging scroll, ink on paper

Dimensions
46 1/4 in x 18 1/2 in (117.5 cm x 47 cm)

Credit Line
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund

Label copy
This imposing hawk perches on the base of a tree, gripping the knotted bark with its talons. Its back is presented to the viewer, bringing attention the impressive patterning and feather detail. Arching its head to the right to reveal a keen awareness of its surroundings coupled with a razor sharp glare, it appears ready to take off after unsuspecting prey. In the Momoyama and early Edo (1615–1868) periods, the statuesque and intrepid hawk was a favorite painting motif for patrons from the warrior class, who kept and used hawks for hunting. It was often depicted on folding and sliding screens and this painting was perhaps originally mounted as a screen.
(Gallery Rotation Fall 2011)
Gallery Rotation Fall 2011
Hawk
Japan, Momoyama Period (1583–1615)
17th century
Hanging scroll, ink on paper
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund, 1964/2.62
This imposing hawk perches on the base of a tree, gripping the knotted bark with its talons. Its back is presented to the viewer, bringing attention the impressive patterning and feather detail. Arching its head to the right to reveal a keen awareness of its surroundings and a razor sharp glare, it appears ready to take off after unsuspecting prey. In the Momoyama and early Edo (1615–1868) periods, the statuesque and intrepid hawk was a favorite painting motif for patrons from the warrior class, who kept and used hawks for hunting. It was often depicted on folding and sliding screens and this painting was perhaps originally mounted as a screen.

Subject matter
In the Momoyama and early Edo (1615–1868) periods, the statuesque and intrepid hawk was a favorite painting motif for patrons from the warrior class, who kept and used hawks for hunting. It was often depicted on folding and sliding screens and this painting was perhaps originally mounted as a screen.

Physical Description
In this painting, the hawk perches on the base of a tree, gripping the knotted bark with its talons. Its back is presented to the viewer, bringing attention the impressive patterning and feather detail. Arching its head to the right to reveal a keen awareness of its surroundings coupled with a razor sharp glare, it appears ready to take off after unsuspecting prey.

Primary Object Classification
Painting

Primary Object Type
hanging scroll

Collection Area
Asian

Rights
If you are interested in using an image for a publication, please visit http://umma.umich.edu/request-image for more information and to fill out the online Image Rights and Reproductions Request Form.

Keywords
hanging scrolls
hawks (bird)
rock (inorganic material)

2 Related Resources

Ink and Realisms
(Part of: Artist Associations and Art Movements)

& Author Notes

All Rights Reserved