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92 Items in this Learning Collection

Copyright
All Rights Reserved ()

Ebisu (God of Prosperity)

Accession Number
1979/2.86

Title
Ebisu (God of Prosperity)

Artist(s)
Japanese

Artist Nationality
Japanese (culture or style)

Object Creation Date
19th century

Medium & Support
wood

Dimensions
( )

Credit Line
Gift of Mr. William Muschenheim

Label copy
These wooden folk carvings depict Daikoku and Ebisu, two of the seven lucky gods (shichi fukujin) of Japanese mythology. Known as the god of good fortune, Daikoku is associated with farmers. Sitting astride two large barrels of rice, Daikoku carries over his shoulder a large sack, brimming with treasure, and in his right hand holds a magic mallet, said to be able to produce anything the heart desires when struck. Though this statue is carved from wood, during the Edo period it was common for such figures to be made of rice, which was not only a source of food and a sign of a bountiful harvest, but a form of currency. Ebisu is the god of prosperity and especially associated with fishermen. Here he carries a large sea bream or red snapper symbolizing good fortune.
Ebisu and Daikoku are both associated with the kitchen and were often enshrined there together to bring fortune and prosperity to the family. These two lucky gods can be found depicted in many folk paintings, including the art of Otsu-e.
(Gallery Rotation Fall 2011)
Gallery Rotation Fall 2011
Daikoku-ten (God of Good Fortune)
Japan, Edo Period (1615–1868)
19th century
Wood
Gift of Mr. William Muschenheim, 1979/2.85
Ebisu (God of Prosperity)
Japan, Edo Period (1615–1868)
19th century
Wood
Gift of Mr. William Muschenheim, 1979/2.86
These wooden folk carvings depict Daikoku and Ebisu, two of the seven lucky gods (shichi fukujin) of Japanese mythology. Known as the god of good fortune, Daikoku is associated with farmers. Sitting astride two large barrels of rice, Daikoku carries over his shoulder a large sack, brimming with treasure, and in his right hand holds a magic mallet, said to be able to produce anything the heart desires when struck. Though this statue is carved from wood, during the Edo period it was common for such figures to be made of rice, which was not only a source of food and a sign of a bountiful harvest, but a form of currency. Ebisu is the god of prosperity and especially associated with fishermen. Here he carries a large sea bream or red snapper symbolizing good fortune.
Ebisu and Daikoku are both associated with the kitchen and were often enshrined there together to bring fortune and prosperity to the family. These two lucky gods can be found depicted in many folk paintings, including the art of Otsu-e.

Subject matter
Ebisu is one of the seven lucky gods (shichi fukujin) of Japanese mythology; he is associated with fishermen. Though this statue is carved from wood, during the Edo period it was common for such figures to be made of rice, which was not only a source of food and a sign of a bountiful harvest, but a form of currency.
Like Daikoku, Ebisu is also associated with the kitchen and were often enshrined there together to bring fortune and prosperity to the family. A lucky god, he can be found depicted in many folk paintings, including the art of Otsu-e.

Physical Description
This woodwork depicts Ebisu, the god of prosperity and especially associated with fishermen. Here he carries a large sea bream or red snapper symbolizing good fortune.

Primary Object Classification
Wood and Woodcarving

Primary Object Type
figure

Collection Area
Asian

Rights
If you are interested in using an image for a publication, please visit http://umma.umich.edu/request-image for more information and to fill out the online Image Rights and Reproductions Request Form.

Keywords
folk art (traditional art)
gods (dieties)
literary theory
wood (plant material)
woodwork

1 Related Resource

Japan Pax Tokugawa 1600-1868
(Part of: Empires and Colonialism)

& Author Notes

All Rights Reserved