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92 Items in this Learning Collection

Copyright
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One of Four Panels of Textile Fragments: Brocades in Various Traditional Pattern

Accession Number
1972/2.44.9

Title
One of Four Panels of Textile Fragments: Brocades in Various Traditional Pattern

Artist(s)
Japanese

Artist Nationality
Japanese (culture or style)

Object Creation Date
1860-1926

Medium & Support
silk brocade (nishiki) and silk brocade with gilt paper (kinran)

Dimensions
18 1/2 in. x 24 1/8 in. ( 46.99 cm x 61.28 cm )

Credit Line
Transfer from the College of Architecture and Design

Label copy
Nishiki is a generic term for a multicolored patterned weave, yet usually it refers specifically to twill weave woven by passing color weft threads over or under two or more warp threads. According to one legend, nishiki first came to Japan in the second century from China, when the King of Wei made a gift of it to Empress Jingû. By the eighth century, Japan was able to manufacture nishiki domestically. Kinran nishiki refers to brocade woven with narrow strips of gilt paper.
Exhibited in "Japanese Costumes & Ceramics, Past & Present," October 2001-February 2002. Maribeth Graybill, Senior Curator of Asian Art
Nishiki is a generic term for a multicolored patterned weave, but usually it refers specifically to twill weave created by passing color weft threads over or under two or more warp threads. According to one legend, nishiki first came to Japan in the second century from China, when the King of Wei made a gift of it to Empress Jingû. By the eighth century, Japan was able to manufacture nishiki domestically. Kinran nishiki, shown in the center of the panel, refers to brocade woven with narrow strips of gilt paper.
Winter 2011 Gallery Rotation
Panel of textile fragments: brocades in various traditional patterns
Japan, late Meiji Period (1868–1912) to early Taishô Period (1912–1926)
Silk brocade (nishiki) and silk brocade with gilt paper (kinran)
Transfer from the College of Architecture and Design, 1972/2.44.9
Nishiki is a generic term for a multicolored patterned weave, but usually it refers specifically to twill weave created by passing color weft threads over or under two or more warp threads. According to one legend, nishiki first came to Japan in the second century from China, when the King of Wei made a gift of it to Empress Jingû. By the eighth century, Japan was able to manufacture nishiki domestically. Kinran nishiki, shown in the center of the panel, refers to brocade woven with narrow strips of gilt paper.

Subject matter
Nishiki is a generic term for a multicolored patterned weave, but usually it refers specifically to twill weave created by passing color weft threads over or under two or more warp threads. According to one legend, nishiki first came to Japan in the second century from China, when the King of Wei made a gift of it to Empress Jingû. By the eighth century, Japan was able to manufacture nishiki domestically. Kinran nishiki, shown in the center of the panel, refers to brocade woven with narrow strips of gilt paper.

Physical Description
A checkered gold brocade foregrounds five fragments of textile: a square in the middle surrounded by four cornerpieces. Each textile has a different design, some with butterflies, birds, and other floral motifs.

Primary Object Classification
Textile

Primary Object Type
brocade

Collection Area
Asian

Rights
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Keywords
brocade (textile)
flowers (plant components)
gold (metal)
goldwork (visual works)
panels (costume components)
textiles (visual works)

& Author Notes

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