Advanced Search

K-12 Educator
K-12 Student
Museum Visitor
UMMA Docent
UMMA Staff
University Faculty
University Student
Between and Mortarboard


UMMA Object Specific Fields






Query builder

This is a resource for Stamps School of Art students, especially for Drawing II.

54 Items in this Learning Collection
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object
Collection Object

Copyright
All Rights Reserved ()

Temple in the Mountains

Accession Number
1955/1.263

Title
Temple in the Mountains

Artist(s)
Kanô School

Object Creation Date
17th century

Medium & Support
hanging scroll, ink on paper

Dimensions
32 11/16 in x 5 3/16 in (83.03 cm x 13.18 cm)

Credit Line
Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Province M. Henry

Label copy
This painting depicts an imaginary scene in south China, the home of the great monasteries where several influential Japanese Zen monks studied in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. The composition is a well-established type: a complex of temple buildings is tucked into a mountainside, on the shore of a broad body of water, with mists rising to obscure the distant peaks. This artist provides a path leading from the viewer’s space to the temple. Two travelers go before us, a hooded figure riding a donkey over a rustic bridge, and another man striding along on foot, further ahead. The temple buildings themselves are hidden behind thick foliage, as if protected from the secular world.
LIke UMMA 1955/1.264, this painting also bears a false seal of Shûbun, one of Japan's most admired landscape painters of the fifteenth century; but in this case, the stype departs radically from the elusive, dreamy quality we associate with Shûbun today. Here the forms of the rocky outcroppings, the trees, and even the mountains are starkly outlined, and there are strong contrasts of light and dark. These features suggest that this is a work of by a professional Kanô School artist, probably of the seventeenth century.
Arts of Zen, February 15-June 15, 2003
M. Graybill, Senior Curator of Asian Art
---
This painting depicts an imaginary scene in south China, the home of the great Zen monasteries where several influential Japanese monks studied in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. The composition is a well-established type: a complex of temple buildings is tucked into a mountainside, on the shore of a broad body of water, with mists rising to obscure the distant peaks. This artist provides a path leading from the viewer’s space to the temple. The temple buildings themselves are hidden behind thick foliage, as if protected from the secular world.
This painting also bears a false seal of Shûbun, one of Japan’s most admired landscape painters of the fifteenth century; but in this case, the type departs radically from the elusive, dreamy quality we associate with Shûbun today. Here the forms of the rocky outcroppings, the trees, and even the mountains are starkly outlined, and there are strong contrasts of light and dark. These features suggest that this is a work by a professional Kanô School artist, probably of the seventeenth century.
(6/28/10)
(Japanese Gallery Rotation, Spring 2010)

Subject matter
This painting depicts an imaginary scene in south China, the home of the great monasteries where several influential Japanese Zen monks studied in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. This painting also bears a false seal of Shûbun, one of Japan's most admired landscape painters of the fifteenth century; but in this case, the type departs radically from the elusive, dreamy quality we associate with Shûbun today.

Physical Description
The composition is a well-established type: a complex of temple buildings is tucked into a mountainside, on the shore of a broad body of water, with mists rising to obscure the distant peaks. The artist provides a path leading from the viewer’s space to the temple. Two travelers go before us, a hooded figure riding a donkey over a rustic bridge, and another man striding along on foot, further ahead. The temple buildings themselves are hidden behind thick foliage, as if protected from the secular world.Here the forms of the rocky outcroppings, the trees, and even the mountains are starkly outlined, and there are strong contrasts of light and dark. These features suggest that this is a work of by a professional Kanô School artist, probably of the seventeenth century.

Primary Object Classification
Painting

Primary Object Type
hanging scroll

Additional Object Classification(s)
Painting

Collection Area
Asian

Rights
If you are interested in using an image for a publication, please visit http://umma.umich.edu/request-image for more information and to fill out the online Image Rights and Reproductions Request Form.

Keywords
clouds
ink
landscapes (environments)
mountains
trees

7 Related Resources

Ink and Realisms
(Part of: Artist Associations and Art Movements)
Japan Pax Tokugawa 1600-1868
(Part of: Empires and Colonialism)
Monuments and Memorials
(Part of 4 Learning Collections)
Math Activity: Perspective
(Part of: Math + Art Enrichment Activities)

& Author Notes

All Rights Reserved