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Results for medium:"porcelain with blue underglaze painting"

47 UMMA Objects (page 1/4)
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The upper surface of this vessel features a circle with the Chinese character &quot;je (祭: ancestral rite)&quot; rendered inside in cobalt blue pigment. The tray features blemishes, while the rims show traces of use. The foot retains traces of coarse sand supports stuck to it during firing. This type of ritual vessel has been excavated from the upper sediment layers of waste deposits of kilns in front of what is now Bunwon-ri Elementary School in Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do. Such vessels are presumed to have been produced immediately before the Bunwon-ri kiln cloised down and to have been widely supplied to the general public.&nbsp;<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.196]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Blue-and-white ritual stand with character for 'che' [ritual]
19th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.283
This small jar features large peony sprays in the center of the body, and above them are decorated a yeoui-head band. This type of the small blue-and-white porcelain jars was popular among collectors thanks to the outstanding harmony of white and blue. This piece has coarse sand spur marks, and red spots are visible on the foot rim. The jar remains intact, and the glaze was well fused.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.173]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Blue-and-white small jar with peony and 'cloud collar' designs
1850 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.285
This carp-shaped water dropper is unique in that its tail is larger than those of many similar vessels. The vessel was entirely glazed including the base and retains wide marks of refractory spurs in three places. This is one of many figurative water droppers produced in large quantities within the vicinity of Bunwon-ri, Gwangju-si, and Yeoju-si in Gyeonggi-do in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.184]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Blue-and-White Water Dropper in the shape of a fish
1850 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.287

Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Blue-and-white shallow plate with the character shou (longevity), surrounded by 4 crabs
Gift of Ellen and Richard Laing
2006/2.53

Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Shallow Abstract Plate with the Character Shou (Longevity) Circled by Four Crabs
Gift of Ellen and Richard Laing
2006/2.54

Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Lamp Stand in the shape of a teapot with floral designs
1700 – 1899
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
1986/2.103

Seifû Yohei III
Miniature Vase with Rabbit Design (1 of 2)
1880 – 1914
Bequest of Margaret Watson Parker
1954/1.506

Japanese (Japanese (culture or style))
Gourd Shaped Vase
1860 – 1910
Transfer from the School of Art and the College of Architecture and Urban Planning.
1997/1.195

Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Blue-an-white cargo bowl "Batavian" with abstract landscape design and "cafe au lait" exterior
1745 – 1755
Gift of the William T. and Dora G. Hunter Collection
2002/2.12
This is a grayish brown small jar with a short neck and a globular body. It is dated to the end of the 19th century, judging from its motifs, color of cobalt-blue and shape. It is decorated with a line around the rim and with floral scrolls on the shoulder. The entire foot is glazed and has grains of coarse sand stuck to it. Extensive contamination from impurities on its surface has given it a yellow tint overall.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.174]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Small Blue-and-White Jar with Bamboo Design, misfired
19th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.277
A round water dropper in the shape of a curled fish. There are two holes, one located in the middle, near the tail fin, and the other near the head on the dorsal fin. The fish is a white and cobalt blue color.<br />
<br />
This is a carp-shaped water dropper produced within the vicinity of Bunwon-ri, Gwangju-si, and Yeoju-si area in Gyeonggi-do in the late 19th century. Its upper surface features a realistic carp design in relief and entirely colored with cobalt blue. Such animal-shaped vessels are simple in form, but they were esteemed by many for their auspicious meaning. The base is flat, wide, and stained by ink.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.184]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Blue-and-White Water Dropper in the Shape of a Fish
1867 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.286
This bowl is decorated with foliage designs on the inner and outer surfaces, belonging to the type of bowl produced in large quantities during the late 19th century. This kind of design was also applied to the white porcelain produced at kilns in Fujian Province of China and in Arita in Japan. It has corase sand spur marks on the rim of the foot, and the coarse sand also stuck to the inner base indicates that the bowl was fired as part of a stack. It was repaired after being broken into six pieces. It is presumed that the bowl was collected from the waste deposite at a kiln site and restored.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.164]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Blue-and-white bowl with pine tree designs
1850 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.289
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