26 UMMA Objects
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This fibula, a type of brooch used to pin outer garments, features a crossbar that ends in three onion-shaped terminals, which give the fibula a shape reminiscent of a crossbow. An arched bow connects the crossbar to the longer catchplate, which is ornamented with vegetal motifs.
Gallo-Roman (Gallo-Roman)
Crossbow fibula with vegetal ornament on the catchplate
450 – 500
Gift of Mr. Robert H. Tannahill
1966/2.17
A small, solid gilt bronze image of the Budddha, shown standing in a slighly swayback pose with both right and left hands in vitarka mudra, the gesture ot teaching. His robe is draped over both shoulders and falls in large, symmentrical V-shaped folds in shallow relief over his torso. His head is small, with the canonical snail-shell curls suggested by tiny knobs of bronze. He has full cheeks, a well-defined mouth, and incised slits for his eyes. There are two incised rings at his neck (instead of the canonical three). He stands on a pedestal of upward, double-petal lotus petals, raised on a hollow base. Some turquoise patina is visible on tthe base and head.
Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Buddha, standing, in vitarka mudra
7th century
Museum purchase for the James Marshall Plumer Memorial Collection
1964/2.97
Gilt bronze standing Buddha on lotus pedestal. He is clothed in monastic robes with cascading U-shaped folds, similar to the gentle folds of his neck. His hands ake the form of two mudras: the abhaya (&ldquo;have no fear&rdquo;) mudra with the right hand, and varada (&ldquo;wishes are granted&rdquo;) mudra with the left.<br />
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It is well proportioned overall and represent Buddha in a standing position; a position quite popular in Unified Shilla Buddhist sculpture. The Ushinisha on the top of Buddha&#39;s head is tall, voluminous and black. The face is plump and facial features, including the eyes, nose and the mouth, are all rather small. The earlobes hang are hanging and the three curved lines on the neck are highly distinct.<br />
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The body and pedestal of this statue were cast as a single mass. The body is made of solid bronze, but the pedestal is hollow. The back part of the pedestal features a hole for the insertion of a mandorla, which is missing. Unlike most Buddha statues from
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Standing Buddha in Abhaya-vara mudra
676 – 935
Museum purchase for the James Marshall Plumer Memorial Collection
1961/2.80

Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Bodhisattva, attendant figure from a larger Buddha shrine
618 – 907
Museum purchase for the James Marshall Plumer Memorial Collection
1961/2.81
Small gilt bronze seated Buddha with Indian and Central Asian characteristics, including the pedestal he is seated on, folds of his robe, and the incised flames in the body halo encompassing him.
Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Buddha, seated in the padmasana pose, in dhyana mudra, with mandorla
433 – 466
Museum purchase for the James Marshall Plumer Memorial Collection
1964/2.94
Slivered metal roundel shape with a center opening for a glass globe (suggested). Along the outer perimeter of the roundel are opalescant convex glass shapes evocative of peacock tail feathers.
Louis Comfort Tiffany
Portion of a lighting fixture, possibly from the entrance hall, H.O. Havemeyer house, New York
1890 – 1891
University purchase 1930, transferred to the Museum of Art, 1986.146.5
1986.146.5

Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Standing figure of a monk, in anjalî mudrâ
7th century
Museum purchase for the James Marshall Plumer Memorial Collection
1961/2.72

Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Buddhist altar ornament: lotus bud supported by two dvarapala
618 – 907
Museum purchase for the James Marshall Plumer Memorial Collection
1961/2.74

Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Buddhist Bronze
650 – 725
Museum purchase for the James Marshall Plumer Memorial Collection
1961/2.78

Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Dvarapala (Buddhist guardian deity)
633 – 666
Gift of Mrs. Caroline I. Plumer for the James Marshall Plumer Collection
1964/2.26
Gilt bronze statue of monk with a begging bowl over his shoulder. This is Phra Malai, who achieved extraordinary powers through his accumulated merit and was able to visit numerous hells and heavens and then travel back to report on what he had seen.  Phrai Malai has elongated ears and stands on a wooden base wearing a detailed robe.
Thai
Phra Malai (The Monk)
1800 – 1932
Gift of Doris Duke's Southeast Asian Art Collection
2005/1.453

Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Bodhisattva, possibly Padmapani, seated in lalitasana and holding a lotus bud in the left hand: part of a Buddhist altar group
618 – 907
Museum purchase for the James Marshall Plumer Memorial Collection
1961/2.71
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