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Results for date_created:"1866"

1668 UMMA Objects (page 1/139)
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Paul Signac
Scenes from Corfu
1863 – 1935
Gift of John Rewald
1983/2.201
;
Otto Bacher
Poplars, Royal Gardens
late 1850s - late 1900s
Museum Purchase
1930.2

Wan Shouqi
Eight Immortals
1850 – 1900
Gift of John Schloss
2000/1.37
This bottle is black-glazed on its entire outer surface, including the inner rim. The glaze is well fused, forming a smooth, shiny surface. There are throwing marks on the entire body. The rim, which appears like a cup placed on top of the neck, is designed to stop liquid from spilling when poured. Bottle such as this one were widely used in everyday life.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.211]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Baluster Bottle
1850 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.245
Large porcelain jar decorated with cobalt pigment under colorless glaze. Repeating clouds border the rim of the jar, while a dragon head and feet are depicted on the main body below. Two blue bands separate the design from the white base below, balancing the rim and bottom portion of the jar. The very tip and base of the piece are also marked with blue bands.<br />
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This is a blue-and-white jar with cloud and dragon designs which is tought to have been produced at Bunwon-ri, Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do around the year1883, when official court kilns there were privatized. The dragon is painted with cobalt on a large jar, but with only its head fully exposed and the body largely concealed by white clouds. This distinctive design is rarely found in blue-and-white porcelain. Two blue horizontal lines encircle the rim, while its shoulder features a yeoui-head band. It is glazed all the way down to the outer base, and coarse sand was used as kiln spurs, which leaves its mark on the foot rim. The Chinese charact
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Blue-and-white jar with dragon-and-cloud design
19th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.282
Dark brown glaze has been dripped over the pot from above, allowing it to flow unevenly so that the lighter clay body shows through in an unpredictable pattern. The jar appears rounded in gradations, and has a small circular lid, as well as base.<br />
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This jar is made of white clay and coated with brown-black glaze. No glaze was applied to the inner surface of the lid or the rim of the jar with which the lid comes into contact. The shoulder is incised with a wave design, while an incised line also surrounds the upper part of the body. The glaze is well fused to form a glossy surface. The jar is almost intact.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.213]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Preserve Jar with Lid
1850 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.294A&B
With a slightly flared thick rim, this bowl was produced at a regional kiln. Bowls or dishes were generally produced in three different standard sizes: large, medium, and small. This one belongs to the medium size. Clay body is exposed on the foot, with coarse sand stuck to its rim. This is a lowquality object, on which the glaze ran downwards, resulting in an uneven surface, but its soft texture due to the lack of sheen is what distinguishes Josoen white porcelain from Chinese or Japanese white porcelain.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.164]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Footed bowl with slightly everted rim
19th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.297
These are <em>jubal</em>, a type of bowl used for serving steamed rice and often also called a <em>sabal</em>. The upper surfaces of the lids of these bowls are decorated with incised lines. Their bases are flat, without feet. The shapes of bowls follow regional characteristics. In northern provinces, rims curve inwards, and bowls are relatively short. In southern provinces, the walls stand almost straight, while bowls themselves are relatively tall.<br />
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<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 249]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Covered Brass Bowl with Protruding Sides
1600 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.307A&B
These are <em>jubal</em>, a type of bowl used for serving steamed rice and often also called a <em>sabal</em>. The upper surfaces of the lids of these bowls are decorated with incised lines. Their bases are flat, without feet. The shapes of bowls follow regional characteristics. In northern provinces, rims curve inwards, and bowls are relatively short. In southern provinces, the walls stand almost straight, while bowls themselves are relatively tall.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 249]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Covered Brass Bowl with Incised Circles
1600 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.308A&B

Japanese (Japanese (culture or style))
Tansu (Chest)
19th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.312
This laquer comb chest with mother-of-pearl inlays has images of phoenixes and their babies, and deer on the top drawer, and tortoises and mandarin ducks on the bottom drawer, each in a pair. The handles are in the shape of bats.<br />
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This ornate comb case glitters with the overall decoration of mother-of-pearl inlay. This case was used by women to store toiletries, such as cosmetics, combs, and oiled paper for collecting hair that falls off when combing (<em>toeballang</em>), etc. Four drawers of the case are arranged in three rows. The uppermost tier and lowest tier have one drawer each. These are decorated with auspicious images: mandarin ducks, deer, and turtles. At the second row, two drawers are decorated with hexagon patterns. Techniques such as <em>kkeuneumjil</em> (cutting thin nacre threads and attaching them according to the design) and <em>jureumjil</em> (cutting nacre according to the design with fretsaws, scissors, knives, etc. and attaching the piece to the lacquered surface) were use
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Comb Chest (Jage Bitjeup)
19th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.314
<p>Carved on both sides, this wooden printing block records Origin of Household Rites (家禮源流,&nbsp;Garyewollyu), a collection of writings on household rites categorized and summarized during the reign of&nbsp;King Hyeonjong (顯宗, r. 1659-1674) of Joseon by a scholar named Yu Gye (兪棨, 1607-1664). This block&nbsp;contains part of Fascicle 4 of the text Origins of Household Rites entitled &ldquo;Going to Welcome the Bride (親迎, chinyeong, Ch. qinying),&rdquo; the procedure in which the groom welcomes the bride at a wedding ceremony.&nbsp;Korea was the first country in the world to use the technique of carving letters on woodblocks and using them&nbsp;for printing. After the invention of metal type in the early Joseon period, woodblock printing was used to&nbsp;publish scriptures, anthologies and family records in Buddhist temples, Confucian academies and households.</p>

<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 290]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Wood Block for Printing
19th century
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.316
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