544 UMMA Objects
Sort by

Crouching or seated female figure with an elongated face that tilts backwards. The figure is holding her breasts and has a distended stomach and deep navel. 
Sierra Leonean (Sierra Leonean)
Female Figure
1400 – 1699
Gift of Leah and John Atwater
2016/1.241
Black lacquered case with two double-hinged doors that curve around the side and meet in the center. In the case are three small metal figures, two standing in the front and one seated in the back. 
Japanese (Japanese (culture or style))
Portable Shrine with Amitabha Buddha and Two Bodhisattva Attendants
1603 – 1868
Gift of Susan Yecies
2017/2.107

Wenceslaus Hollar
Tobias and the Angel
17th century
Gift of J. Frederick Hoffman
2005/1.429

Jacques Callot (French (culture or style))
Woman with Headpiece and Muff
17th century
Gift of J. Frederick Hoffman
2007/2.148
A figure is sitting on a lotus-shaped pedestal, which is itself placed on an hexagonal pedestal. The figure wears a drape hanging from the left shoulder and covering the bottom. The arms are placed in front; right hand holding the left index finger. The facial expression is calm; the two eyes looking down; a dot on the forehead. Two elongated ears. A tall crown on the head. The two halos are on the back of the figure; one behind the head and other behind the torso. Two halos are surrounded by an oval-shaped dais. The statue and pedestals are guilded with gold; some polychrome remnants.
Japanese (Japanese (culture or style))
Vairocana Buddha (Japanese, Dainichi Nyorai)
17th century
Museum purchase made possible by the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund
2003/2.59.1
A gray-brown jar with a short, splayed neck. High-fired stoneware jar from the Goryeo or Josen period. The wave design on the side is set between two horizontal ridges.<br />
<br />
This is a gray-brown, high-fired stoneware jar. Its short neck splays sharply and is connected to a mouth that spreads almost horizontally. The body is widest at its upper-central part and decorated by a wave design between two sets of horizontal ridges. The flat base has no foot and is recessed at its center.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 85]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Jar
918 – 1910
Gift and partial purchase from Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp, purchase with funds from Elder and Mrs Sang-Yong Nam
2021/1.139

Sekino Jun'chiro
Portrait of a Boy: Sean …
960 – 1970
Gift of Gilbert M. Frimet
2004/1.148
This is an ink drawing of a woman in an arched niche or at a window; she emerges from a shadowy background, and her arms are possibly crossed, or alternately her right arm is bent parallel to the picture plane, while her left arm appears to dangle (or dangle something) over the ledge. She wears a cap, and her gaze appears lowered. The image of the woman is surrounded by a marbled broder.
Rembrandt van Rijn
Woman at a Window
1625 – 1700
Joseph F. McCrindle Collection
2009/1.512
Burial wares are those placed in tombs as a way of praying for the continued happiness and comfort of the deceased in the afterlife. Offering vessels produced in the Joseon period included smaller reproductions of the vessels used every day, such as jars, boxes, and bowls, among others. The University of Michigan Museum of Art houses a set of white porcelain offering vessels buried in pit graves between the late 16th century and early 17th century. The vessels are coated in pale blue glaze but generally tinged with gray. They were fired without using saggers, while resting on fine sand supports. Their glaze is relatively well applied and fused. The cintamani-shaped knobs on the lids are similar to those found on the lids of vessels produced at white porcelain kilns near Seondong-ri and Songjeong-ri in Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do in the 17th century.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.191]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Burial Set (15 plates, 16 bowls and 6 lids)
17th century
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.79.37
Burial wares are those placed in tombs as a way of praying for the continued happiness and comfort of the deceased in the afterlife. Offering vessels produced in the Joseon period included smaller reproductions of the vessels used every day, such as jars, boxes, and bowls, among others. The University of Michigan Museum of Art houses a set of white porcelain offering vessels buried in pit graves between the late 16th century and early 17th century. The vessels are coated in pale blue glaze but generally tinged with gray. They were fired without using saggers, while resting on fine sand supports. Their glaze is relatively well applied and fused. The cintamani-shaped knobs on the lids are similar to those found on the lids of vessels produced at white porcelain kilns near Seondong-ri and Songjeong-ri in Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do in the 17th century.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.187]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Burial Set (15 plates, 16 bowls and 6 lids)
17th century
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.79.12
Burial wares are those placed in tombs as a way of praying for the continued happiness and comfort of the deceased in the afterlife. Offering vessels produced in the Joseon period included smaller reproductions of the vessels used every day, such as jars, boxes, and bowls, among others. The University of Michigan Museum of Art houses a set of white porcelain offering vessels buried in pit graves between the late 16th century and early 17th century. The vessels are coated in pale blue glaze but generally tinged with gray. They were fired without using saggers, while resting on fine sand supports. Their glaze is relatively well applied and fused. The cintamani-shaped knobs on the lids are similar to those found on the lids of vessels produced at white porcelain kilns near Seondong-ri and Songjeong-ri in Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do in the 17th century.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.188]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Burial Set (15 plates, 16 bowls and 6 lids)
17th century
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.79.11
Burial wares are those placed in tombs as a way of praying for the continued happiness and comfort of the deceased in the afterlife. Offering vessels produced in the Joseon period included smaller reproductions of the vessels used every day, such as jars, boxes, and bowls, among others. The University of Michigan Museum of Art houses a set of white porcelain offering vessels buried in pit graves between the late 16th century and early 17th century. The vessels are coated in pale blue glaze but generally tinged with gray. They were fired without using saggers, while resting on fine sand supports. Their glaze is relatively well applied and fused. The cintamani-shaped knobs on the lids are similar to those found on the lids of vessels produced at white porcelain kilns near Seondong-ri and Songjeong-ri in Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do in the 17th century.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.188]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Burial Set (15 plates, 16 bowls and 6 lids)
17th century
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.79.9
xxxx
Loading…